End of Unit Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2: Comparing Conflicting Accounts of the Pearl Harbor Attack | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M3A:U1:L13

End of Unit Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2: Comparing Conflicting Accounts of the Pearl Harbor Attack

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze texts for disagreement on facts or interpretation. (RI.8.9)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL8.1)
  • I can build on others' ideas during discussions. (SL.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze FDR's "Day of Infamy" speech and the Japanese Foreign Ministry's "Fourteen-Part Message" for disagreement on facts or the interpretation of facts.
  • I can participate in a Fishbowl discussion about two different responses to the attack on Pearl Harbor.
  • I can listen to others and build on their ideas during the Fishbowl discussion.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl note-catcher
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2: Comparing Conflicting Accounts of the Pearl Harbor Attack
  • (specifically the goals based on the rubric)
  • Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Discussion Wrap-Up

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Review Discussion Goals (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2 (20 minutes)

B. Fishbowl Debrief, Part 2 (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Discussion Wrap-Up (12 minutes)

B. Preview Homework (1 minute)

4. Homework

A. Read two sections in Unbroken, along with two summaries included in the structured notes. Complete the structured notes.

  • This lesson is the second half of a two-day Fishbowl discussion based on historical documents written to justify war between the United States and Japan during WWII (FDR's "Day of Infamy" speech and Japan's "Fourteen-Part Message"). 
  • These Fishbowl discussions serve as the End of Unit 1 Assessment. They assess students' ability to analyze conflicting historical texts and use their new understandings to contribute to a cooperative, text-based discussion.
  • The historical content of the Fishbowl discussions builds background knowledge about Unbroken by illuminating why Japan and the United States were at war with each other.
  • In this lesson, students continue to work in the same pairs from the previous lesson. The student experts on the "Fourteen-Part Message" sit in the inside circle during this lesson, and the student experts on the "Day of Infamy" speech sit behind their partner in the outside circle.
  • At the outset of this lesson, students review their personal discussion goals using the Fishbowl Discussion Rubric: The Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor. After the discussion, the students in the inside circle self-reflect on their progress toward their goals.
  • Students in the outside circle take notes on the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Note-catcher regarding what they hear and learn during the discussion. After the discussion, they share these findings with their partner.
  • Students respond to two prompts on the Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Discussion Wrap-Up at the end of the lesson. Use the NYS Grade 8 2-point rubric to assess this exit ticket.
  • In advance: Review Fishbowl Discussion protocol (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

Do not preview vocabulary.

Materials

  • "Fourteen-Part Message" (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Fishbowl Discussion Rubric: The Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor (from Lesson 12; one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Note-catcher (from Lesson 10; returned in Lesson 12 with teacher feedback)
  • Fishbowl sentence starters (from Lesson 12; one per student in inside circle)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2: Comparing Conflicting Accounts of the Pearl Harbor Attack (one per student and one for display)
  • Document camera
  • Timer
  • Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Discussion Wrap-Up (one per student)
  • Unbroken structured notes, pages 147-168 (one per student)
  • Unbroken supported structured notes, pages 147-168 (optional; for students needing additional support)
  • Unbroken Structured Notes Teacher Guide, pages 147-168 (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Review Discussion Goals (2 minutes)

  • Explain that today is the second day of the two-part Fishbowl discussion. Today's discussion will focus on the "Fourteen-Part Message." In the previous lesson, students determined two or three goals to work toward during the Fishbowl discussion. In this lesson, students who focused on Japan's "Fourteen-Part Message" will have their turn to speak in the inside circle and work toward these goals.
  • As needed, review the Fishbowl Discussion protocol briefly
  • Some students will benefit from having more concrete examples of discussion goals to choose from. Consider providing these students with a list of sample goals for the discussion and letting them choose which ones they would like to work on, rather than having them write their own goals.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2 (20 minutes)

  • Invite students to take their copies of the "Fourteen-Part Message," Fishbowl Discussion Rubric: The Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor, and the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Note-catcher and move to their appropriate places inside and outside the circle. Remind them that those in the outside circle should sit directly behind their partners.
  • Remind the class that those in the outside circle need to take notes in the Listening Notes section of the Fishbowl note-catcher regarding what they hear and learn during the discussion.
  • Distribute one copy of the Fishbowl sentence starters to each student in the inside circle. Encourage them to use this resource during the discussion.
  • Explain that students will have 15 minutes to discuss, and you will use a timer to keep track of this. Tell them you will start the discussion by asking some questions, but they should focus on talking to each other, rather than just answering your questions.
  • Distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion, Part 2: Comparing Conflicting Accounts of the Pearl Harbor Attack to each student and display a copy using a document camera.
  • Set the timer for 15 minutes and begin the discussion by asking:

* "From your perspective, what was the gist of this text?"

  • After a few students have shared their understanding of the text's gist, ask: 

* "What did the Japanese government accuse the United States of doing?"

* "What was the Japanese government's perspective on the Pearl Harbor attack?"

  • Encourage all students to respond to the questions using evidence from their Fishbowl note-catcher and the text.
  • Choose from the following questions to engage students further in the discussion. If the discussion runs out of steam at any point, return to this list of questions and ask a new one to keep students thinking:

* "What key facts did the Japanese use in this text? How were each of these facts interpreted?"

* "Were there any facts that the Japanese government omitted?"

* "What questions do you have for other people in the circle about their understanding of this text?"

  • Consider modifying the Fishbowl sentence starters for struggling readers or students who need more processing time. Cut the list down to three basic sentence starters and put each one underneath a heading, such as: "When You Agree," "When You Disagree," and "When You Have a Question."
  • Consider preparing students who need more processing time or who struggle with speaking in front of others by giving them a list of the other perspectives/roles in the discussion beforehand.

B. Fishbowl Debrief, Part 2 (10 minutes)

  • Give students in the outside circle 3 minutes to complete their Listening Notes. While they are doing this, direct students sitting in the inside circle to the Self-Reflection portion of the Fishbowl Discussion rubric. Ask them to think about and record things they did well during the discussion and things they could improve upon for future discussions.
  • Tell students to meet with their partner. Give them 2 minutes for the person in the outside circle to share reflections on what they heard/learned during the discussion and 2 minutes for the person in the inside circle to share reflections.
  • Ask students to turn and talk to their partner:

* "What are the overall differences in perspectives?"

  • Cold call two or three student pairs to share their ideas.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Discussion Wrap-Up (12 minutes)

  • As a closing piece to the Fishbowl discussion, have students complete the Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Discussion Wrap-Up.

B. As time permits, invite students to share out whole group. Preview Homework (1 minute)

  • As time permits, invite students to share out whole group. Preview Homework (1 minute) Distribute Unbroken structured notes, pages 147-168.
  • Let students know they should complete their reading assignments in Unbroken, read the summaries provided for pages 141-147 and 156-166 in the structured notes, and complete the structured notes.

Homework

Homework
  • Read the summary for pages 141-147 provided in the structured notes, then read pages 147-156 in Unbroken and record the gist. Next, read the summary provided for pages 156-166, then read 166-168 in the book and record the gist. Answer the focus question: "During Louie's ordeal of being lost at sea, Hillenbrand writes of several occasions in which he experiences the presence of God. What are these experiences like, and how does he experience God in each of them?" Finish filling in the structured notes

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