Mid-Unit Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U3:L1

Mid-Unit Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.8.3)
  • I can create poetry, stories, and other literary forms. (W.8.11b)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain why I chose my character and scenes from A Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • I can explain how my narrative develops the thematic concept of control.
  • I can begin to write a first draft of my character confession.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Collect End of Unit 2 Assessments (2 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Mid-Unit Assessment (15 minutes)

     B.  Analyzing the Character Confessional Rubric (10 minutes)

     C.  Drafting the Character Confessional (12 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Previewing Homework (1 minute)

4.  Homework

     A.  Finish writing the first draft of your character confessional narrative. 

  • Although this is the first official lesson of Unit 3, students began preparing in Unit 2, Lessons 16 and 17. Thus, in effect, this is the third lesson of this unit.
  • In this lesson, students complete an on-demand mid-unit assessment. The questions posed in the assessment have been discussed at length in previous lessons, so students should be able to answer them confidently.
  • Use Buffalo Discussion Appointments today.
  • Students spend a portion of this lesson analyzing the rubric used to score the narrative.
  • Assess student responses on the mid-unit assessment using the Grade Eight 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

justifications

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection (sample response, for teacher reference)
  • 2-Point Rubric: Short Response (for teacher reference; use to score students' assessments)
  • Character Confessional Rubric (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Lined paper (several pieces per student)
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 10)
  • Character Confessional Narrative Planner (from Unit 2, Lesson 17)
  • Performance Task Prompt (from Unit 2, Lesson 16)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream (book; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Collect End of Unit 2 Assessments (2 minutes)

  • Remind students that their homework assignment was to finish the final draft of their End of Unit 2 Assessment essay. Collect the final draft of the essays, along with the first draft, rubric, and planners.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you:

*   "I can explain why I chose my character and scenes from A Midsummer Night's Dream."

*   "I can explain how my narrative develops the thematic concept of control."

*   "I can begin to write a first draft of my character confession."

  • Ask students to Mix and Mingle. Students stand up, circulate, and find a partner to talk through the question. They change partners multiple times.

*   "What does it mean for your narrative to develop the theme of control?"

  • Listen for students to mention the three guiding questions from the prompt, related to motivation, methods, and effects of controlling or manipulating others from the perspective of characters in the play.
  • Gathering answers to key questions from multiple students helps all students better understand the requirements of an abstract task because they can hear it explained in multiple ways and practice explaining it to others.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit Assessment (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that the purpose of this narrative is to take on the perspective of a character from A Midsummer Night's Dream and give voice to the theme of control in the play. The scenes from the play that students choose to bolster their character confessional provide evidence for the character's motivations, methods, and the effects of attempting to control others.
  • Tell students:

*   "One way we can check our choice of evidence is to provide justifications. In the case of this narrative, if we can justify our use of particular scenes to illuminate the perspective of the character, then we will be able to write a good narrative using that character's voice."

  • Distribute the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection.
  • Give students a couple of minutes to read through the questions on the handout and ask any clarifying questions.
  • Remind them that in an assessment, they have to work independently without talking to other students.
  • Tell students to begin.
  • Collect the assessments at the end of the time allotted.

B. Analyzing the Character Confessional Rubric (10 minutes)

  • Distribute and display the Character Confessional Rubric using the document camera. Tell students that it is based on the same rubric that was used to assess their argument and Module 1 essays. Draw students' attention to the last row, "4--Excellent." Ask them to notice things that might be different from what they did in the argument essay and Module 1 essay.
  • Cold call on students to share their ideas. Listen for: "The first row is focused on content and analysis and has to do with the motivation, method, and result(s) of a character's attempts to control another's actions."
  • Point out that the Coherence, Style, and Organization row has to do with the pacing and events of the narrative, and the Control of Conventions row requires students to use correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
  • Give students several minutes to review the rubric and answer clarifying questions as necessary.

C. Drafting the Character Confessional (12 minutes)

  • Distribute lined paper and invite students to use their Evidence of Control note-catchers (from Unit 1, Lesson 10) Character Confessional Narrative Planners (from Unit 2, Lesson 17), and Performance Task Prompt (from Unit 2, Lesson 16), as well as their copies of A Midsummer Night's Dream to draft their character confessional narratives.
  • Remind students to follow the criteria on the Character Confessional Rubric.
  • Circulate to assist students in writing their narratives. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Have you incorporated the quotes from the play in your narrative?"

*   "Have you introduced your character and presented his or her motives?"

*   "Does your narrative explain enough of the character's perspective so the reader isn't guessing?"

*   "Have you answered the three guiding questions from the prompt?"

*   "Have you given a lot of details and used sensory language?"

  • Asking questions linked to the criteria as students are writing can help to remind them of what is expected of their work and can push their thinking further by exposing things that are inaccurate or missing.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Previewing Homework (1 minute)

  • Tell students that for homework they will finish writing the first draft of the character confessional narrative for homework. 

Homework

Homework
  • Finish writing the first draft of your character confessional narrative.

Note: Assess student responses on the mid-unit assessment using the 2-Point Rubric: Short Response.

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