Analyzing Character and Theme: Tracking Control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U2:L2

Analyzing Character and Theme: Tracking Control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how characters try to control one another in A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Ongoing Assessment

  • A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 3.2.124-365 (from homework)
  • Three Threes in a Row note-catcher
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Partners Share Focus Question from Homework (3 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing the Learning Target (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Drama Circle: 3.2.366-493  (10 minutes)

     B.  Close Reading: Three Threes in a Row (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Evidence of Control Note-catcher: Puck (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Continue filling in the Evidence of Control note-catcher (for Puck) if you did not do so in class.

     B.  Reread 3.2.366-493 and complete the structured notes.

  • After the Drama Circle, students get out of their seats, move around, and interact with others while discussing text-dependent questions in a Three Threes in a Row activity. This protocol was introduced in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 10 and also was used in Unit 1, Lesson 12 of this module. This activity allows students to work in groups to answer a row of questions to become the "experts" on those questions for their classmates during the circulation time. This protocol requires students to listen, process, and record; it is not a pass-the-paper activity. The questions increase in complexity across each rotation, with the final questions focusing on the idea of control in the play.
  • Students use their discussions from the Three Threes in a Row activity to inform their writing on the Evidence of Control note-catcher. The scene read in this lesson deals with Oberon's attempts to control Demetrius and Lysander, and the consequences of his previous attempts to do so.. Puck is also a key player in this scene, mischievously imitating Lysander's and Demetrius' voices to trick them in the forest. This provides a good opportunity for students to consider Puck's desire to control others. He is motivated both by Oberon and by his own desire to create chaos, which is evident in this scene.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

negligence (3.2.366), haste (3.2.399), consort (3.2.409), lighter-heeled (3.2.442), constrain (3.2.457)

Materials

  • A Midsummer Night's Dream (book; one per student)
  • Three Threes in a Row note-catcher: Act 3, Scene 2, lines 366-493 (one per student)
  • Three Threes in a Row note-catcher: Act 3, Scene 2, lines 366-493 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 10; one per student)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 3.2.366-493 (one per student)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream supported structured notes, 3.2.366-493 (optional; for students who need additional support)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream Structured Notes Teacher's Guide, 3.2.366-493 (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Partners Share Focus Question from Homework (3 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out the structured notes they completed for homework. Invite students to pair-share their responses to the focus question. Listen for them to discuss how Helena's misunderstanding propels the action by making Hermia even angrier at her and by making Lysander and Demetrius fight even harder to prove their love to her.
  • After students have discussed their responses, cold call one or two students to share what they discussed.

B. Reviewing the Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning target aloud with you:

*   "I can analyze how characters try to control one another in A Midsummer Night's Dream."

  • Tell students that today they will work with the Evidence of Control note-catcher, which will help them prepare for an essay in which they analyze how a character tries to control others in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • Ask students to show a Fist to Five to indicate how well they think they are meeting this learning target. Clarify as needed and remind them there is still time to work on the target before Unit 2, when they will write about the theme of control.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Drama Circle: 3.2.366-493 (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to gather in the Drama Circle. Be sure they have their copies of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Ask students to turn to Act 3, Scene 2 (lines 366-493).
  • Remind students that in the previous part of this scene, Hermia and Helena argued about their situation with Lysander and Demetrius, while Lysander and Demetrius argue over Helena. Invite students to turn and talk to refresh their memories:

*   "How did the dialogue in the scene reveal aspects of the characters?"

  • Listen for students to review their Written Conversations from the previous lesson.
  • Ask students to turn and talk:

*   "Whose desire to control others resulted in the argument between Hermia, Helena, Lysander, and Demetrius that we read about yesterday?"

  • Listen for students to describe Oberon's actions and desire to control others.
  • Launch the scene by reminding students to continue thinking about this idea of control in the play, especially the role of Puck in controlling the characters in this part of the scene.
  • Invite students to volunteer for the roles of Oberon, Robin, Lysander, Demetrius, Helena, and Hermia. Choose roles and remind students to read loudly and clearly, with appropriate expression. Begin the read-aloud of 3.2.366-493. Pause to discuss and clarify as needed. 
  • This read-aloud builds comprehension of this scene. Consider having stronger readers complete the read-aloud while others listen and follow along.
  • Gauge your students' understanding of the text as you read aloud and consider pausing to discuss important elements, especially vocabulary and language. This will bolster students' comprehension so they can dig deeper during the discussion activity in Work Time B.

B. Close Reading: Three Threes in a Row (20 minutes)

  • Distribute the Three Threes in a Rownote-catcher: Act 3, Scene 2, lines 366-493 and make sure students have their copies of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Assign each group one row (three questions) of the note-catcher. (Depending on class size, more than one group may have the same set of three questions.)
  • Note: This is not a pass-the-paper activity. Students each write on their own note-catcher. They must listen, process, and summarize.
  • Give directions:

Part 1:

  1. Your group answers just the three questions on your row.
  2. Take 10 minutes as a group to read your three questions, reread the text, and jot your answers.

Part 2:

  1. Walk around the room to talk with students from other groups. Bring your notes and text with you.
  2. Ask each person to explain one and only one answer.
  3. Listen to the explanation and then summarize that answer in your own box.
  4. Record the name of the student who shared the information on the line in the question box.
  5. Repeat, moving on to another student for an answer to another question. (Ask a different person for each answer so you interact with six other students total.)
  • Have students begin Part 1 in their small groups. Circulate to listen in and support as needed. Probe, pushing students to dig back into the text to find answers to each question.
  • After 10 minutes, focus students whole group. Begin Part 2 and give them about 7 minutes to circulate.
  • Then ask students to return to their seats and refocus whole group.
  • Display the Three Threes in a Row note-catcher: Act 3, Scene 2, lines 366-493 (answers, for teacher reference) so that students may check their answers (students can use the Three Threes in a Row note-catcher as they fill out the Evidence of Control note-catchers).
  • Consider grouping students heterogeneously for the initial three questions. This will help struggling students gain expertise on the initial questions in order to accurately share information with others.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all students but especially challenged learners.
  • During Work Time B, you may want to pull a small group of students to support in more basic comprehension of this scene of the play.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Evidence of Control Note-catcher: Puck (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Evidence of Control note-catchers. Tell students they will now use the note-catcher to record key information about Puck's attempt to control others in the play. Reinforce for students that the discussions they had during the Three Threes in a Row activity helped clarify the ways Puck controlled Demetrius and Lysander in this part of the scene. Remind students that this note-catcher will help prepare them for the essay they will write at the end of this unit.
  • Call students' attention to the relevant section of the note-catcher: Robin/Puck's name on the left-hand side of page 3 of the note-catcher.
  • Students should be familiar with this note-catcher. Address any clarifying questions or common challenges you observed from students' previous use of this note-catcher. If needed, invite students to read the questions on the top row of the note-catcher aloud with you:

*   "Why does this character want to control that person?"

  • Explain that this question asks students to consider the motivation behind Puck's desire to control others.

*   "How does the character try to control that person?"

  • Clarify that this question asks students to consider the methods Puck uses to control others.

*   "What are the results of this character's attempts to control that person?"

  • Reinforce that this question asks students to consider the consequences of Puck's attempts to control others. Tell students they may leave this box blank until the next lesson, when they will read about the results of Puck's actions.
  • Invite students to begin recording information on their note-catchers. Remind students that they must look back at the text to find the evidence that most strongly supports their answers. Their explanations of the evidence should be clear and succinct.
  • Distribute A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 3.2.366-493 and preview as needed. 
  • Consider distributing the supported version of the structured notes to students who need help summarizing Shakespeare's dense text and defining key vocabulary words.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Continue filling in the Evidence of Control note-catcher (for Puck) if you did not do so in class.
  • Reread 3.2.366-493 and complete the structured notes.
  • Consider providing the supported version of the structured notes to students who need help summarizing Shakespeare's dense text and defining key vocabulary words.

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