Launching the Performance Task: Prompt, Characters, Groups | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U2:L16

Launching the Performance Task: Prompt, Characters, Groups

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can work effectively with a group to create group norms to make group discussion and collaborative work productive and enjoyable.
  • I can work effectively with a group to prepare to write a character confessional narrative.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Writer: The Comedy of the Play (5 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minute)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Studying the Prompt (10 minutes)

     B.  Allocating Characters and Character Groups (10 minutes)

     C.  Allocating Key Scenes (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Finish reading through your Evidence of Control note-catcher for the character for which you will be writing a confessional. Decide on the scenes you are going to use for your character confessional narrative.

  • Although this lesson is in Unit 2, it is actually the kickoff for Unit 3. This is to give you time to look over the draft end of unit assessments before handing them back to students with feedback in Lesson 18.
  • Before this lesson, use the exit ticket from Lesson 15 to analyze students' favorite character choices and assign characters to students. Try to balance the number of students assigned to each character so that groups are of similar size and of mixed ability. Consider making groups of no larger than four students. This will mean that some groups will be focused on the same character, which is fine.
  • Do not assign the character of Puck, as he is the source of the model essay.
  • The purpose of Opening A is to allow students to find the comedic moments in this play. Be sure to emphasize the humorous nature of this writing assignment. Assure students that they are allowed to take a light-hearted perspective and write to generate laughs from audience members.
  • As students are introduced to the prompt for the final performance task in Work Time A, they briefly unpack the word "confession." As students analyze the model narrative, a more complete understanding of this word will make its meaning clearer.
  • The character confessional writing piece is considered a narrative since it attends to the criteria of the narrative genre. Students develop imagined experiences or events from A Midsummer Night's Dream using effective techniques, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences with transition words and phrases. Students also establish the context of the theme of control, as well as the point of view of the character (and narrator) seeking to control another character in the play. Students select scenes from the play, which unfold naturally and logically. Finally, students provide a conclusion that reflects on the narrated experiences or events.
  • Review Think-Write-Pair-Share protocol (see Appendix; also known as Ink-Pair-Share)
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

effectively, norms, collaborative, productive

Materials

  • Document camera
  • Performance Task Prompt (one per student and one for display)
  • Frayer Model: Control (from Unit 1, Lesson 7; one for display)
  • Chart paper (one piece per group)
  • Markers (one per group)
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 10; students' own)
  • Index card or paper (one piece per student; for exit ticket)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Writer: The Comedy of the Play (5 minutes)

  • Using the Think-Write-Share protocol, invite students to think for about a minute about an event in the play they found especially amusing and why they thought it to be so.
  • Then allow students another minute to write down their thoughts about their chosen events.
  • Finally, have students share with a partner what they found to be funny about the chosen scene and why.
  • Cold call a few students to share out a funny scene from the play.
  • Explain to students that they are going to begin working on their final performance task in this lesson. The writing piece in this task will give students an opportunity to think about the humor involved in how one character tried to control or manipulate another character in the play.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minute)

  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the posted learning targets aloud:

*   I can work effectively with a group to create group norms to make group discussion and collaborative work productive and enjoyable.

*   I can work effectively with a group to prepare to write a character confessional narrative.

  • Ask:

*   "What does it mean to work effectively?"

  • Select volunteers to share responses. Listen for students to explain that to work effectively means to work well together.
  • Ask:

*   "What are norms? Why do we make norms?"

* Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that norms are positive behaviors that help groups work well together.

  • Ask:

*   "What is collaborative work?"

  • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for students to explain that collaborative work is working with others.
  • Ask:

*   "What does productive mean?"

  • Listen for students to explain that productive means to do a lot of good work in a short span of time.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying the Prompt (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that they are going to begin working on Unit 3. Using a document camera, display and distribute the Performance Task Prompt. Be sure to emphasize that this narrative is a chance to be humorous and have fun with the perspective of a character.
  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the Performance Task Prompt directions aloud.
  • Ask students,

*   "What do you think of when you hear the word 'confession'?" Wait about 1o seconds, then allow students to popcorn their responses by calling out their thoughts. Listen for something like: "Confession is about telling your innermost thoughts and keeping no secrets."

  • Remind students of how the word "control" has been defined throughout the module. Display the Frayer Model: Control (from Unit 1, Lesson 7). Draw students' attention to how the word "control" was defined in the context of studying the play: "Control means to influence, convince, or manipulate someone into doing something you want or into thinking or believing what you want."
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "So what are you going to be doing for your performance task?"

  • Listen for students to explain that they will be writing as if they are a character confessing his or her attempts to control or manipulate someone else in the play. Students should also state that their confessionals must address the three guiding questions that focus on motivations, techniques, and effects of the character's attempt to control others. Answer any clarifying questions if necessary.
  • Ask:

*   "What text will you use to answer these three guiding questions?" Listen for students to recognize that they will be using the play to answer these questions.

  • Explain to students that this confessional is considered a narrative writing piece since they will be selecting and incorporating scenes from the play in their confessional.
  • Share with students that they will be reading their narrative to a small group of their peers as part of the final performance task.

B. Allocating Characters and Character Groups (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that you used the exit tickets from the last lesson (in which they listed their top three favorite characters) to assign each person a character to use to complete the work in Unit 3. Inform each student of his or her character assignment and form groups of like characters (e.g., Hermia characters together, Oberon characters together, etc.). Groups should have no more than four students each. Invite students to join their character groups.
  • Remind students that when they start working in a new group, it is a good idea to create some group norms to make sure that group discussion and collaborative work is productive and enjoyable for everyone.
  • Hand out a piece of chart paper and a marker to each group.
  • Ask guiding questions:

*   "How can you make sure you have productive group discussions? What do you each need to do? Why?"

*   "How can you make sure everyone gets a chance to share his or her ideas and be heard?"

  • Circulate to help groups think of norms. 
  • Asking groups to write group norms makes them think about criteria for successful teamwork and provides a guide to refer to when they find teamwork challenging and need support.

C. Allocating Key Scenes (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to pull out their completed Evidence of Control note-catchers (from Unit 1, Lesson 10). Tell students that they will first study the note-catcher for their assigned character in order to identify scenes that would best answer the three guiding questions for the narrative, included on the Performance Task Prompt.
  • Ask students to discuss in their character groups:

* "How do the scenes you have chosen best answer the three guiding questions in the prompt?"

  • As you circulate, listen for conversations that are explicitly connecting scenes with the motivations, techniques, and aftermath of that group's particular character trying to control another person's actions.
  • Remind groups of their norms chart; circulate to assist groups that are struggling to identify the scenes that best address the guiding questions of the writing prompt.
  • Allowing students to work independently before sharing as a group provides individual accountability and assessment data. Also, when students then join a group to share out their ideas, all students can participate (since they all attempted the work) and expand their own thinking by listening to the ideas of others.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Distribute an index card or scrap paper (one per student) for the exit ticket, on which students will answer the question:

*   "In your own words, what is the final performance task asking you to do?"

  • Review the exit tickets to ensure that every student understands the overall requirements of the performance task.
  • Using exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs before the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish reading through your Evidence of Control note-catcher for the character for which you will be writing a confessional. Decide on the scenes you are going to use for your character confessional narrative.

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