Analyzing Text Structure: “The Shakespeare Shakedown” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U1:L5

Analyzing Text Structure: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in "The Shakespeare Shakedown," including the role of a particular sentence in developing a supporting claim.
  • I can analyze the development of the argument in "The Shakespeare Shakedown."
  • I can identify specific supporting claims that Simon Schama makes in "The Shakespeare Shakedown."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Summary Writing graphic organizer (from homework)
  • Students' annotated copies of "The Shakespeare Shakedown"
  • Fist to Five

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Sharing Summaries (5 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Guided Practice: Analyzing Paragraph Structure (15 minutes)

     B.  Practicing With a Partner: Analyzing Text Structure (18 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Debriefing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  None

  • Students continue to work with Simon Schama's article "The Shakespeare Shakedown."
  • In this lesson, they work together to analyze paragraph structure in the article. This is a complex text and a challenging task. Support students as needed through the guided practice of Work Time A. Students have an opportunity to practice with a partner using an easier paragraph in Work Time B.
  • Review: Fist to Five in "Checking for Understanding Techniques" (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

evaluate, objectively summarize

Materials

  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown" (from Lesson 2; one per student and one to display)
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Analyzing Text Structure note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 5 Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Sharing Summaries (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Albany Discussion Appointment partner to share the summary of the article each one wrote for homework.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to follow along while you read the learning targets aloud:

*   "I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown,' including the role of a particular sentence in developing a supporting claim."

*   "I can analyze the development of the argument in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

*   "I can identify specific supporting claims that Simon Schama makes in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

  • Remind students that they have been analyzing Simon Schama's article over several lessons. The author's argument consists of the central claim, supporting claims, and reasons that the author uses to express his or her position.
  • Today, students will continue to read the article closely, this time focusing on paragraph structure. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Guided Practice: Analyzing Paragraph Structure (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their copies of "The Shakespeare Shakedown." Let them know that now they will analyze the structure of a paragraph and the purpose of particular sentences in Schama's article.
  • Distribute "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Analyzing Text Structure note-catcher and display it on the document camera.
  • Tell students that the note-catcher will lead them through an analysis of the structure of Paragraph F in "The Shakespeare Shakedown." Ask them to work together on this with their Albany Discussion Appointment partner.
  • Refer to the "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 5 Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference) for guidance on how to support students in this portion of the lesson.
  • As pairs are working, circulate to ensure that they understand the analysis of the paragraph structure.
  • Once students are done, refocus the class. Cold call pairs to share their analyses of paragraph structure. Invite students to refine their note-catchers based on the class discussion.
  • Analyzing text structure supports students who struggle with reading and writing, particularly ELLs, because it gives them an explicit way to see how sentences build on one another to make meaning. 
  • Talking as a whole class after a small group activity gives the teacher as well as students a chance to check understanding and correct any misconceptions. 

B. Practicing With a Partner: Analyzing Text Structure (18 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have analyzed the structure of a paragraph with your support, they will turn their attention to practicing analyzing another paragraph's structure. This time they will use the second side of the Analyzing Text Structure note-catcher as they take a closer look at Paragraph E.
  • Refer to side 2 of the Close Reading Guide to support students in this portion of the lesson.
  • Have students continue to work with their Albany partner. Circulate to ensure that they understand the analysis of the paragraph structure.
  • Once students are done, refocus the class. Cold call pairs to share their analyses of paragraph structure. Invite students to refine their note-catchers based on the class discussion.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debriefing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets one a time for the class. Ask students to rate themselves using the Fist to Five Checking for Understanding technique on how confident they are that they have mastered each learning target:

*   "I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown,' including the role of a particular sentence in developing a supporting claim."

*   "I can analyze the development of an argument in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

*    "I can identify specific supporting claims that Simon Schama makes in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

Homework

Homework
  • None.

 Note: Students will show what they know about analyzing an author's argument, including the author's central claim and supporting claims, as well as summarizing an informational text, in the next lesson, which is the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment.

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