Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “The Shakespeare Shakedown” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U1:L3

Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze Simon Schama's perspective in "The Shakespeare Shakedown."
  • I can analyze how Simon Schama acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints.

Ongoing Assessment

  • QuickWrite 1 (from homework)
  • Highlighting in student copies of "The Shakespeare Shakedown"
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 3 text-dependent questions

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Introducing Discussion Appointments (8 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Chalk Talk: Questioning Texts, Perspective (15 minutes)

     B.  Close Reading: Analyzing Conflicting Viewpoints (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Revisiting Learning Targets and Reflecting on Close Reading (4 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Take your copy of "The Shakespeare Shakedown" home with you and complete the vocabulary task.

  • In this lesson, students set up "Discussion Appointments" with five peers; these appointments will be used for peer conversation throughout the module. This new routine builds on students' work in their "numbered heads" group in Module 1, gradually encouraging them to work with more and more of their classmates. These discussion structures support students' mastery of SL.8.1.
  • In advance: Prepare chart paper for the Chalk Talk. Write one of these questions on each paper and post around the classroom:

-   "What does Simon Schama think and say about who wrote the works attributed to Shakespeare?"

-   "Who is the intended audience of the speech?"

If you have a big class, consider posting two of each question around the classroom so students can easily see them.

  • Review: Chalk Talk protocol (see Appendix).

Vocabulary

perspective, conflicting viewpoints; counterclaims

Materials

  • Instructions for Discussion Appointments (for teacher reference)
  • Discussion Appointments handout (one per student)
  • Timer
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 3 Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference)
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown" (from Lesson 2; one per student)
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 3 Text-Dependent Questions (one per student)
  • Chart paper for Chalk Talk with questions prepared (two, four, or six pieces of chart paper, depending on the size of your class)
  • Markers (one per student)
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout  (from Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Lesson 3 Homework: Vocabulary in "The Shakespeare Shakedown" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing Discussion Appointments (8 minutes)

  • In advance, review the Instructions for Discussion Appointments. Tell students you are going to explain the new protocol for meeting with peers during Module 2. Distribute the Discussion Appointments handout. Tell students that this is a way for them to have partner discussions with several of their classmates. Being able to talk to a lot of classmates will give them more ideas for discussing and writing about the texts during this module. Reinforce that discussion is one strong way to deepen their understanding of a text.
  • Give the following directions for making Discussion Appointments:
  1. You will sign up for five appointments with five different partners.
  2. For each location on the map, you may have only one appointment.
  3. If someone asks you for an appointment and that location is available, you need to accept the appointment.
  4. In the blank next to each location, write the name of your appointment partner.
  5. Once you have made all five appointments, return to your seat.
  • Give students 3 minutes to make their Discussion Appointments. Consider setting a timer to help them stay focused and do this task quickly. Circulate to support or clarify as needed.
  • About halfway through this sign-up process, check with the class to see who needs appointments in various locations. You can do this by asking, for example:

*   "Raise your hand if you need an appointment in Rochester."

  • As students raise their hands, match them up.
  • Once they have their sheets filled out, ask students to return to their seats. Tell them that they will work with these Discussion Appointment partners regularly.
  • Remind them that if their partner is absent on a given day or they do not have a partner for a particular location, they should report to you at the front of the room and you will tell them with whom to meet.
  • Discussion Appointments are a way for students to work with different classmates, leading to mixed-ability groupings. Mixed-ability groupings of students for regular discussion and close reading exercises provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Read the first learning target aloud:

*   "I can analyze Simon Schama's perspective in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

  • Invite students to talk to their partner about what perspective means. After a minute, refocus the class and cold call one pair. Listen for them to say: "Perspective means point of view." Clarify if necessary, ensuring that students understand that perspective and point of view mean the same thing.
  • Read the second learning target aloud:

*   "I can analyze how Simon Schama acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints."

  • Ask students to turn to their partner and compare the two learning targets: What do they have in common? Cold call one or two pairs. Listen for: "Both learning targets are about viewpoints." Clarify if necessary.
  • Explain that today, the class will reread "The Shakespeare Shakedown" and analyzing the different perspectives in it.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Chalk Talk: Questioning Texts, Perspective (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Buffalo Discussion Appointment partner.
  • Cold call students to share what they wrote for the homework QuickWrite. Listen for them to identify that Schama uses evidence about Shakespeare's family history, education, and knowledge of kings and queens to support his argument.
  • Use the "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 3 Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference) to guide students through a Chalk Talk. They will need their text "The Shakespeare Shakedown" plus the "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 3 Text-Dependent Questions handout and their chart paper and markers before they begin the Chalk Talk. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Revisiting Learning Targets and Reflecting on Close Reading (4 minutes)

  • Reread the learning targets aloud or ask student volunteers to do so:

*   "I can analyze Simon Schama's perspective in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

*   "I can analyze how Simon Schama acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints."

  • Give students specific positive praise for strong thinking you noticed as they worked with the article (in this lesson, as well as based on your observational data from the previous lesson).
  • Invite students to pull out their Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout from Module 1 (or distribute a fresh handout). Remind them that they worked with this resource during Module 1. Invite students to read over it and place a star next to questions they have worked on in this lesson and the previous lesson with Schama's article. Model briefly if needed.
  • Watch for students to place stars by these questions:

-   "Who is the author?"

-   "What is the title?"

-   "What type of text is it?"

-   "What words or phrases are critical for my understanding of the text?"

-   "What is the author thinking and saying about the topic or theme?"

-   "Who is the intended audience of the text?"

Remind students that in the case of this text, the author's thinking can also be called the author's position.

  • Emphasize that this resource is something they can continue using throughout the year as a form of coaching for themselves on the many questions close readers ask themselves as they work with complex text.
  • As time permits, probe with students about which of these questions felt particularly helpful as they dug into analyzing Schama's article, and why.
  • Distribute the Lesson 3 Homework: Vocabulary in "The Shakespeare Shakedown" and preview as needed.
  • Checking in with learning targets helps students self-assess their learning. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners most.

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