The Authorship of Shakespeare: “The Shakespeare Shakedown” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U1:L2

The Authorship of Shakespeare: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite the evidence that Simon Schama uses to support his claims in "The Shakespeare Shakedown."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Advantages/Disadvantages T-Chart (from homework)
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 2 text-dependent questions 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Reviewing Homework (3 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing the Learning Target (1 minute)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Reading for Gist: Reading "The Shakespeare Shakedown" (15 minutes)

     B.  Text-Dependent Questions (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Debriefing the Learning Target and Previewing Homework (1 minute)

4.  Homework

     A.  QuickWrite 1: What are three pieces of evidence Schama gives to support his central claim in the article "The Shakespeare Shakedown"?

  • In the Opening of this lesson, students share the advantages/disadvantages T-chart from homework. It is important to note that they are not assessed on this standard until Module 3. This activity serves as practice.
  • This is the first in a series of four lessons in which students build background knowledge about Shakespeare and the questions about his authorship. In this lesson, students study an article that addresses one viewpoint on the question of whether Shakespeare penned all of the works attributed to him. Students begin their close reading and analysis of this article by reading the article for the gist.
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown" is the focus of Lessons 2-5. Be sure students hold on to their copy of the article throughout these lessons.
  • Lessons 2-5 are based heavily on the Making Evidence-Based Claims units developed by Odell Education. Students will refer to the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (first introduced in Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 1). For the original Odell Education units, go to www.odelleducation.com/resources.
  • The writing in Module 2B, Unit 1 builds on the skills students developed in Module 1, including QuickWrites (see in particular Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3) and summary writing (see in particular Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 5).
  • Beginning with Module 2, lessons that involve close reading include a new type of supporting material, a Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference). Use this guide to support you in facilitating Work Time in this lesson.
  • In advance: Read and prepare Simon Schama's "The Shakespeare Shakedown." The text needs to be broken into sections by paragraph. Before giving the students their text, mark the sections as follows:

-   Section A: Paragraph 1

-   Section B: Paragraph 2

-   Section C: Paragraph 3

-   Section D: Paragraph 4

-   Section E: Paragraph 5

-   Section F: Paragraph 6

  • Post: Learning target.

Vocabulary

cite, claim, central claim, supporting claims; attributed, authorship, bard, anonymous, patron, courtier, middling, rudimentary

Materials

  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown" by Simon Schama (one per student)
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Document camera
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 2 Text-Dependent Questions (one per student and one to display)
  • "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 2 Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference)
  • QuickWrite 1 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Reviewing Homework (3 minutes)

  • Ask students to locate their Advantages/Disadvantages T-chart (from homework). Invite them to turn and talk with a partner about the advantages and disadvantages of learning from images and text.
  • Cold call several students to share their advantages and disadvantages.

B. Reviewing the Learning Target (1 minute)

  • Invite a student to read the learning target aloud:

*   "I can cite the evidence that Simon Schama uses to support his claims in 'The Shakespeare Shakedown.'"

  • Ask:

*   "What does it mean to cite evidence?"

  • Cold call a student to answer. Ideally, students will understand that to cite means "to name or mention," and evidence refers to the details the author uses from the text.
  • Explain that an author uses claims to identify and support his position. The author's overall position is called the central claim, and the reasons the author uses to support this central claim are called the supporting claims.
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for Gist: Reading "The Shakespeare Shakedown" (15 minutes)

  • Ask:

*   "What if I told you that Shakespeare didn't actually write all the things that are attributed or credited to him? What if I told you some people doubt his authorship or that he authored or wrote the things he did?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk about this question. Tell them that they are going to read an article that defends the authorship of Shakespeare. Later on, they will read another article that denies the authorship of Shakespeare.
  • Distribute "The Shakespeare Shakedown" by Simon Schama. Share with students that they will spend some time with this new text over the next four lessons.
  • Ask students to notice the title, author's name, and date. Invite them to turn and talk to a partner to restate the author's position or perspective.
  • Display the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout using the document camera. Ask students to think to themselves about which questions they should ask when getting a text for the first time. Ask them to turn and talk to their partner:

*   "What questions do you think are important to ask? Why?"

  • Cold call a pair to share. Listen for students to point out the questions in the Approaching Texts row of the document, including:

-   "Who is the author?"

-   "What is the title?"

-   "What type of text is it?"

-   "Who published the text?"

-   "When was the text published?"

  • Tell students that they will read closely to understand the author's position or view and how the author crafts the structure of the text to prove the central claim.
  • Ask them to read along silently and circle words they are unfamiliar with as you read the article aloud.
  • Invite them to turn to a partner and talk about the gist of the article.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.
  • Text-dependent questions can be answered only by referring explicitly to the text being read. This encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and allows for a deeper understanding.

B. Text-Dependent Questions (25 minutes)

  • Display and distribute "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 2 Text-Dependent Questions.
  • Use "The Shakespeare Shakedown": Lesson 2 Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference) to help students work through the series of text-dependent questions.
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially challenged learners.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debriefing the Learning Target and Previewing Homework (1 minute)

  • Invite students to reflect on the learning target.
  • Cold call one or two to cite an important piece of evidence they uncovered from the article about the authorship of Shakespeare.
  • Distribute the QuickWrite 1 and preview as necessary, emphasizing the criteria for a strong response.

Homework

Homework
  • QuickWrite 1: What are three pieces of evidence Simon Schama gives to support his central claim in the article "The Shakespeare Shakedown"?

Note: In the next lesson, students will use the Close Reading document again, which was first introduced in Module 1, Unit 2, and was reviewed during this lesson. Be sure students have their own old copies of this document or prepare new ones.

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