Author’s Craft: Poetry and Prose | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U1:L15

Author’s Craft: Poetry and Prose

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the theme of control in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • I can analyze the poetry and the prose language in A Midsummer Night's Dream and how each contributes to meaning and tone.

Ongoing Assessment

  • A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 2.2.90-163 (from homework)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question (10 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Drama Circle: Act 3, Scene 1, Part 1 (20 minutes)

     B.  Author's Craft: Poetry and Prose (13 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Preview Homework (1 minute)

4.  Homework

     A.  Reread 3.1.1-75 and complete the structured notes. 

  • In this lesson, students begin reading Act 3, Scene 1 of A Midsummer Night's Dream using the Drama Circle routine used in previous lessons.
  • This lesson's focuses on Shakespeare's craft and builds on Lesson 12 (in which students learned to recognize the rhyme, rhythm, and meter of Shakespeare's poetry). Today, students analyze how Shakespeare used differing language (poetry and prose) to differentiate his characters and set certain tones throughout the play.
  • Parts of this lesson draw inspiration from Lesson 5 on A Midsummer Night's Dream in Shakespeare Set Free; refer to that book for more details and additional activities.
  • In advance: Review Act 3, Scene 1 Teacher's Guide, Part 1.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

prose; abide (3.1.12), prologue (3.1.17), assurance (3.1.20), chink (3.1.63), cranny (3.1.69)

Materials

  • Evidence of Control note-catcher (from Lesson 10)
  • Play Map (from Lesson 8)
  • Tips for Reading Shakespeare handout (from Lesson 9)
  • Act 3, Scene 1 Teacher's Guide, Part 1 (for teacher reference)
  • Author's Craft: Poetry and Prose in A Midsummer Night's Dream handout (one per student)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 3.1.1-75 (one per student)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream supported structured notes, 3.1.1-75 (optional; for students who need additional support)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream Structured Notes Teacher's Guide, 3.1.1-75 (for teacher reference) 

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Discussing the Focus Question (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit with their Buffalo discussion partners to discuss the focus question from last night's structured notes: "What are the consequences of Oberon's attempts to control others using the 'love-in-idleness' flower?"
  • After 2 minutes, cold call several pairs to share out. Listen for students to say that Titania is going to fall in love with someone as a result of being anointed with the flower (but we don't know who yet), that Lysander falls in love with Helena because Robin makes a mistake, and that Hermia's heart will be broken as a result.
  • Invite students to add these consequences to their Evidence of Control note-catcher in Oberon's row.
  • Then, encourage students to think about how Lysander controls others in the scene they reread for homework. Ask:

*   "Who does Lysander try to control while he is under Oberon's spell?"

  • Cold call a student to respond. Invite students to continue discussing Lysander's attempt to control Helen as they fill out the corresponding row in their Evidence of Control note-catchers.
  • Tell students they will begin reading Act 3 today, which features Bottom and the other tradesmen rehearsing for their play. 

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Read the learning targets aloud as students follow along silently:

*   "I can analyze the theme of control in A Midsummer Night's Dream."

*   "I can analyze the poetry and the prose language in A Midsummer Night's Dream and how each contributes to meaning and tone."

  • Explain that students will look more closely at the way that Shakespeare used poetry and prose or regular, non-rhyming language within this play today.
  • Have students take out their Play Map and Tips for Reading Shakespeare handout to use as references.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Drama Circle: Act 3, Scene 1, Part 1 (20 minutes)

  • Invite students to set their chairs up for today's Drama Circle.
  • Assign roles for this reading: Bottom, Quince, Snout, and Starveling.
  • Before beginning the Drama Circle reading, review what students know about the "play within a play" in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Listen for them to say that the group of tradesmen, directed by Peter Quince, have decided to perform a play for Theseus and Hippolyta's wedding. They have been meeting in the woods to prepare for the play. Although Quince is the director, Bottom has emerged as the vocal leader of the group.
  • Have students read this scene aloud, starting on page 69 (3.1.1) and ending on page 73 (3.1.75).
  • After this first read, have students read the scene again. Consider switching roles for this second read. Explain that this time you will pause to answer questions about what they read. (Refer to the Act 3, Scene 1 Teacher's Guide, Part 1 for detailed notes on guiding students through this scene.)
  • Consider splitting up the roles (Bottom 1, Bottom 2, etc.) so more students can participate. This also allows you to differentiate.
  • Consider creating a nametag for each character to wear during the Drama Circle.
  • Consider appointing several students to act as "interpreters." When the Drama Circle read-aloud hits a particularly challenging bit of language, the interpreters are charged with referring to the left-hand page for explanatory notes, then reading or paraphrasing.

B. Author's Craft: Poetry and Prose (13 minutes)

  • Invite students to turn and talk to their neighbor about the language of this part of the play: How does it differ from the language of Act 2?
  • After a minute, cold call several pairs to share their answers. Listen for students to say that this section of the play is not written as poetry, while all of Act 2 was. (Students might also point out that this part of the play does not rhyme or that it does not have a clear rhythm, both of which also point to its being written as prose.)
  • Ask students what these two kinds of written language styles are called. Listen for them to say that Act 2 was written as poetic language or verse, while Act 3 is written as prose.
  • Distribute the Author's Craft: Poetry and Prose in A Midsummer Night's Dream handout. Explain that some characters in this play speak entirely in verse, while others speak entirely in prose.
  • Tell students to work in pairs to fill in the top row of the table on the handout: "Characters who speak in verse" and "Characters who speak in prose." Circulate while students work to check for accuracy.
  • After a few minutes, when most students have successfully categorized the characters, cold call several pairs to share answers. Listen for students to recognize that Bottom and the other tradesmen speak in prose, while all of the other characters speak in verse.
  • Read the next part aloud as students follow along silently:

*   "In this play, verse and prose have different effects. Place a 'V' on the line below to represent verse, and a 'P' to represent prose."

  • Guide students through the four spectrums on the handout, coming to a general consensus about where the "P" and "V" should fall in each case. Listen for students to recognize that, in this play, prose sounds less rhythmic, formal, musical, and educated than verse.
  • Explain that Shakespeare made these choices about language intentionally because he wanted the language of his play to convey certain messages about the characters and the content. Tell students to work with their partners to answer the last question on the page: "What message(s) did Shakespeare want to convey about his characters by writing some of their lines as verse and others as prose?" Circulate while students work.
  • After a few minutes, refocus whole group and review their ideas about why Shakespeare wrote the dialogue this way. Listen for students to say that Shakespeare wanted Bottom and the other tradesmen to sound less educated and less well-mannered than everyone else in the play as a type of comic relief. These characters exist to be laughed at, and their manner of speaking is a big part of the joke.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Preview Homework (1 minute)

Distribute the A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 3.1.1-75. Tell students that they will reread the same passages from today's Drama Circle for tonight's homework. Remind them to use the Play Map and Tips for Reading Shakespeare handout to help them.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Reread 3.1.1-75 and complete the structured notes.
  • Consider providing the supported version of the structured notes to students who need help summarizing Shakespeare's dense text and defining key vocabulary words.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up