Analyzing Language, Character, and Theme: World Café Discussion | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U1:L14

Analyzing Language, Character, and Theme: World Café Discussion

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of a literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (analogies or allusions). (RL.8.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • I can analyze how characters' words and actions reveal aspects of their character.
  • I can analyze the theme of control in A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Ongoing Assessment

  • A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 2.1.195-276; 2.2.33-89 (from homework)
  • Midsummer Night's Dream 2.2.90-163 note-catcher
  • Evidence of Control note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Adding to the Evidence of Control Note-catcher and Reviewing Learning Targets (10 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     Drama Circle: 2.2.90-163 (10 minutes)

     World Cafe (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Adding to the Evidence of Control Note-catcher (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Reread 2.2.90-163 and complete the structured notes.

  • In this lesson, students begin with the Drama Circle, as usual, and then discuss the scene that is read aloud independently. This time, they follow the World Cafe protocol in which they move from group to group to discuss key questions about the read-aloud.
  • In this Drama Circle, students read the selected lines twice: the first as a pure read-aloud without interruptions, and the second with guided teacher questions.
  • Time in the Drama Circle is shorter than in most lessons; students will discuss the material during the World Cafe protocol instead of during and after the read-aloud. The bulk of the time in the lessons is devoted to this protocol to ensure students' comprehension of the text. Students still read the scene twice to bolster comprehension.
  • World Cafe protocol promotes discussion and leadership in students. The first round and the first transition need very clear direction. After that, students tend to pick up the protocol quickly.
  • Students use their discussions from the World Cafe activity to inform their writing on the Evidence of Control note-catcher during the Closing and Assessment. The scene read in this lesson deals mostly with the results of Oberon's attempts to control Titania and Lysander. After the read-aloud, students will know the results of Oberon's attempt to control Demetrius, but will still wait for the results of his attempt to control Titania. Consider circulating to clarify this for students.
  • Note that students add to the Evidence of Control note-catcher both during the Opening and the Work Time. This is because examples of control occur simultaneously during this part of the play. It's important that students capture these examples as they happen in order to reinforce their understanding of the play and their sense of chronology and consequences.
  • In advance: Review the World Cafe protocol (see Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets; instructions for World Cafe.

Vocabulary

perish (2.2.113), tedious (2.2.119), mockery (2.2.130), scorn (2.2.131), disdainful (2.2.137)

Materials

  • Evidence of Control note-catcher (from Lesson 10)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream (book; one per student)
  • Midsummer Night's Dream 2.2.90-163 note-catcher (one per student)
  • Midsummer Night's Dream 2.2.90-163 note-catcher (sample, for teacher reference)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 2.2.90-163 (one per student)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream supported structured notes, 2.2.90-163 (optional; for students who need additional support)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream Structured Notes Teacher's Guide, 2.2.90-163 (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Adding to the Evidence of Control Note-catcher and Reviewing Learning Targets (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out the Evidence of Control note-catcher. Invite students to join their New York City discussion partner to share their responses to the focus question. Remind students that they launched the section of the play they read in class yesterday by discussing Demetrius and Helena's relationship. Tell students to discuss how Helena and Demetrius try to control one another and add the information to their note-catchers.
  • Remind students that in Act 1, Helena shared Hermia and Lysander's secret plan to run away together to win Demetrius's attention. Demetrius goes to the forest, with Helena following him. Tell students to turn and talk:

*   "Why does Demetrius want to control Helena once they get to the forest?"

  • Cold call a student to share what he or she discussed with a partner. Emphasize that in this case, Demetrius wants to control Helena because he wants to search for Hermia and wants Helena to leave him alone as he does so. Invite students to fill out their Evidence of Control note-catchers accordingly, continuing to discuss the remaining questions with their partners.
  • After students have discussed their responses, cold call one or two students to share what they discussed with their partners.
  • Invite students to read the first learning target aloud with you:

*   "I can analyze to the theme of control in A Midsummer Night's Dream."

  • Remind students that they have been working with this particular target for two lessons now. They will continue to add to the Evidence of Control note-catcher later in the lesson today, which will prepare them for an essay in which they analyze how a character attempts to control others in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • Ask students to show Fist to Five depending on their confidence with this learning target. Clarify as needed and remind them there is still time to work on the target before Unit 2, when they will begin writing about control.
  • Read the remaining targets aloud to students or invite a volunteer to do so:

*   "I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night's Dream."

*   "I can analyze how characters' words and actions reveal aspects of their character."

  • Remind students that they have also been practicing these targets, and they will combine these skills as they continue to discuss control today.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Drama Circle: 2.2.90-163 (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to gather in the Drama Circle. Be sure students have their text, A Midsummer Night's Dream. Ask students to turn to Act 2, Scene 2, lines 90-163.
  • Remind students that they've already read the preceding part of this scene both in class during the previous lesson and for homework. In the preceding part, Oberon goes into the woods and places the flower nectar on Titania's eyes. Meanwhile, Hermia insists that she and Lysander sleep separately in the woods, to make sure they remain innocent. Robin finds Lysander, sleeping alone, and assumes he is Demetrius. He places the flower nectar on his eyes, believing he is following Oberon's orders.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to refresh their memories:

*   "Why did Puck make the mistake of placing the nectar on Lysander's eyes?"

  • Listen for students to describe how Oberon's orders were too vague. Since Oberon didn't know there was more than one Athenian man in the forest, he told Puck to identify him by his clothing. Since Lysander was probably wearing a similar outfit; Puck thought he had the right man, when in fact it was the wrong one. Circulate and probe/clarify as needed.
  • Remind students that they have been thinking about the idea of control in the play. Tell students you would like them to think about the results of the characters' attempts to control each other in this scene. More specifically, students should look for the consequences of Oberon's attempt to control Demetrius.
  • Launch the scene by prompting students to make predictions. Say:

*   "Turn and talk about you predictions about what you think will happen in the remainder of this scene."

  • Call on one or two volunteers. Students should be prepared for Oberon to anoint Titania with the magical flower nectar, but will likely not predict Puck's blunder when he uses the nectar on Lysander instead of Demetrius.
  • Invite students to volunteer for roles (Helena, Demetrius, Lysander, Hermia). Remind students to read loudly and clearly, with appropriate expression. Begin the read-aloud of 2.2.90-163.
  • After this first read, have students read the scene again. Consider switching roles for this second read. Pause to clarify or discuss as necessary, keeping in mind the discussion activity to follow will also aid students' comprehension of the reading.
  • This read-aloud builds comprehension of this particular scene. Consider having stronger readers complete the read-aloud while others listen and follow along.
  • Note that there is no discussion guide for this lesson since students will discuss and answer key questions on their own during Work Time Part B. Gauge your students' understanding of the text as you read aloud and consider pausing to discuss important elements, especially vocabulary and language. This will bolster students' comprehension so they can dig deeper during the World Cafe activity in Work Time Part B.

B. World Cafe (20 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the past few lessons they learned to do the following:

-   Analyze how characters' words and actions reveal aspects of their character

-   Analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night's Dream

-   Analyze the themes of control in A Midsummer Night's Dream

  • Tell students that to analyze the lines from Act 2, Scene 2, they will focus on the same skills--this time in a World Cafe protocol. Explain that in the World Cafe, they will work in small groups to think about and discuss different questions. There will be three rounds; after each round, the groups switch according to the protocol.
  • Share the protocol with the class:
  1. Work in groups of four.
  2. Each group selects a leader. The leader's job is to facilitate the discussion and keep the group focused.
  3. The teacher says the focus question for this round.
  4. The group discusses the question for Round 1 and adds to their notes for 3 or 4 minutes.
  5. The leader stays put; the rest of the group rotates to the next table.
  6. The leader shares the major points of his or her group's discussion with the new group members.
  7. Each table selects a new leader.
  8. Repeat the process until everyone has had the chance to discuss each question.
  • Arrange students in groups of four. Distribute the Midsummer Night's Dream 2.2.90-163 note-catcher. Tell students to ignore the bottom right-hand box for now; they will come back to this later.
  • Ask students to point to Round 1 on the note-catcher. Read the question aloud:

*   "Round 1: What does Helena mean in lines 94-95?"

  • Invite students to get started by taking 2 minutes to reread the lines and take notes on the question for Round 1.
  • From here, facilitate according to the protocol. Be sure to read each question aloud before students begin a new round. 
  • Circulate and check for understanding as groups meet and discuss each question. Provide support to all groups as necessary. See Midsummer Night's Dream 2.2.90-163 note-catcher (for teacher reference) for sample notes.
  • After all three rounds, refocus students whole group. Debrief the World Cafe protocol by referring to the lesson's learning targets. During the debrief, continue to refer to the student responses to each learning target on the Midsummer Night's Dream 2.2.90-163 note-catcher.
  • Reread the first posted learning target:

*   "I can analyze the poetic language or verse in A Midsummer Night's Dream"

  • Cold call on one or two students to share what they think Helena means in lines 94 and 95.
  • Repeat with the second learning target:

*   "I can analyze how characters' words and actions reveal aspects of their character."

  • Cold call one or two students to share their interpretation of Helena's words in lines 130-131 and what they say about her as a character.
  • Read the third learning target:

*   "I can analyze the themes of control in A Midsummer Night's Dream."

  • Cold call one or two students to share what they wrote about the results of Oberon's attempt to control Demetrius.
  • When the World Cafe protocol is over, refocus whole class. Recognize positive behaviors that you noticed during the World Cafe (showing leadership, referring often to their texts, asking each other questions to clarify ideas, etc.). Cold call students to share their responses from their note-catchers. Invite the class to continue revising or adding to the note-catchers as appropriate during this time.
  • Consider grouping students heterogeneously. This will help students who struggle to gain expertise on the initial questions in order to accurately share information with others.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners but especially supports challenged learners.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Adding to the Evidence of Control Note-catcher (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Evidence of Control note-catcher. Call their attention to Oberon's name on the left-hand side of page 3.
  • Invite students to read the final questions on the top row of the organizer aloud with you:

*   "What are the results of this character's attempts to control that person?"

  • Reinforce that this question asks students to consider the consequences of Oberon's attempts to control others. Remind students they left this box blank because they had not yet discovered the consequences of Oberon's attempts to control others. Now, they know the results of his attempt to control Demetrius, and may add it to their note-catchers.
  • Invite students to record this new information on their note-catchers. Remind students that they must look back into the text to find the evidence that most strongly supports their answers. Their explanations of the evidence should be clear and succinct.
  • If students choose to track Oberon's attempt to control Titania, tell them they may preview their homework during this time instead of adding to the note-catcher. Encourage them to read the focus question and begin rereading.
  • Distribute A Midsummer Night's Dream structured notes, 2.2.90-163 and preview homework as needed. 

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Reread 2.2.90-163 and complete structured notes.
  • Consider providing the supported version of the structured notes to students who need help summarizing Shakespeare's dense text and defining key vocabulary words.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up