Launching the Module: The Universal Appeal of Shakespeare, Part 1 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2B:U1:L1

Launching the Module: The Universal Appeal of Shakespeare, Part 1

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different media to present an idea. (RI.8.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can describe information from images about the universal appeal of Shakespeare.
  • I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from images.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Notice/Wonder note-catcher 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Gallery Walk (15 minutes)

     B.  Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  "The Lure of Shakespeare": Read-aloud (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Debriefing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Complete the Advantages/Disadvantages T-chart.

  • This lesson launches Module 2B and begins to build students' background knowledge about the universal appeal of William Shakespeare's works. As students engage in a Gallery Walk, they use images to help build this background knowledge.
  • Students also read along as the teacher reads aloud a text that further develops their background knowledge about Shakespeare. This read-aloud gives students a chance to hear a fluent reader model difficult text. This is a "pure" read-aloud, with no interruptions. Read to model fluency and help build understanding.
  • Students then consider the advantages and disadvantages of learning about Shakespeare from images and text.
  • This is a two-part lesson. Students will return to the topic of the universal appeal of Shakespeare in Lesson 7. Hold on to the Gallery Walk images to use again in that lesson.
  • In advance: Review the Gallery Walk protocol (see Appendix); prepare and post the photographs for the Gallery Walk (see links in the supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

inferences, universal appeal, images, advantages, disadvantages, lure

Materials

  • Gallery Walk image sources (for teacher reference; see Teaching Note)
  • Notice/Wonder note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Timer
  • "The Lure of Shakespeare" (one per student and one for read-aloud)
  • Advantages/Disadvantages T-chart (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Gallery Walk (15 minutes)

  • In advance, be sure to have posted the images from the Gallery Walk image sources throughout the room (or along the hallway outside the classroom).
  • Distribute the Notice/Wonder note-catcher and display a copy on a document camera.
  • Explain the Gallery Walk protocol. Tell students that in a moment, they will examine severalimages that are posted. At each image, they should pause and capture specific details they notice (e.g., "Actors on stage," "Children performing a play") and the things they wonder about ("I wonder what play they are performing?" or "In what country is this play being performed?")
  • Tell students that they will have just a minute at each image and that they might not get to all of the images.
  • You might need to coach your students about your expectations for safe movement and for quiet voices during this work period:

*   "As you move from image to image, there is no need to engage in side conversations. I expect 'zero' voice levels during this time. Also, please move carefully, taking care not to bump into one another.")

  • Invite students to begin. Use a timer set to 7 minutes to keep students focused on the gallery. As the class completes this activity, circulate to observe and support as needed.
  • After about 7 minutes, ask students to return to their seats.
  • Cold call several students to share what they noticed and wondered.
  • Review for students that when they use their background knowledge to add meaning to an image or text, they are making inferences.
  • Ask:

*   "What do all of these images have in common?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk to a partner about this question. While pairs discuss, circulate and probe to encourage them to move beyond the literal of what they see in the images to what they infer about the images.
  • Cold call pairs to share their thinking.
  • Share with students that all of these images have to do with William Shakespeare. Point out that there are some images of children, prisoners, and the elderly performing Shakespeare. There are images of a play by William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, being performed in Africa and Korea. There are also images of playbills or advertisements of different productions of A Midsummer Night's Dream, and there is a traditional image of William Shakespeare.
  • Invite students to turn and talk:

*   "Based on all of these images (people of different walks of life, ages, nationalities, etc.), what are some conclusions or inferences you can make about Shakespeare's works?"

  • Cold call several pairs. Ideally, students will recognize that Shakespeare's works are appealing to people across time and cultures. (You will revisit this concept in Lesson 7; do not worry if students' ideas are somewhat ill-formed or superficial at this point.)
  • Students engaged in a similar Gallery Walk in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1. They may benefit from engaging in the Gallery Walk with assigned partners to control the sharing and processing they are doing during this time.
  • Consider partnering ELLs who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read aloud the first learning target:

*   "I can describe the information from images about the universal appeal of Shakespeare."

  • Tell students that they are used to reading words to gather information about something, and today they "read" a different type of text. They looked at images such as paintings, photographs, lists, etc., to gather information.
  • Share that in Module 1, students studied the universal refugee experience, and in today's Gallery Walk, they looked at images that show the universal appeal of Shakespeare. Invite students to turn and talk:

*   "What might the term universal mean?"

  • Cold call pairs to share their thinking. Be sure they understand that the phrase universal appeal refers to the interest and impact of Shakespeare's works across time, cultures, ages, and walks of life.
  • Read aloud the second learning target:

*   "I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from images."

  • Share with students that the experience of looking at images is different from reading about the same topic. Ask:

*   "What do the words advantages and disadvantages mean?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk, then call on volunteers to answer. Draw students' attention to the prefix dis- in the word disadvantage. Remind them that dis- means "not" or "the opposite of something." An advantage is a positive aspect of something, and a disadvantage is a negative aspect of something. Share with students that they will have time to think about the advantages and disadvantages of looking just at images to understand something.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. "The Lure of Shakespeare": Read-aloud (20 minutes)

  • Explain to students that now that they have built some background knowledge about the universal appeal of Shakespeare by looking at images, they will learn a bit more by reading a text.
  • Distribute "The Lure of Shakespeare" to students. Explain that the word lure means "attraction" or "appeal." Cold call a student to predict what this article will be about based on this helpful definition. Ideally, students will understand that this article will be about why people have found Shakespeare's works to be appealing or interesting.
  • Invite students to use their copy of the article to read along as you read it aloud.
  • After reading, have students turn and talk to a partner:

*   "What else did you learn about the universal appeal of Shakespeare from this article?"

  • Cold call pairs to share what they learned.
  • Ask:

*   "What was different about learning from the article versus the images?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk and cold call pairs to share their thinking.
  • This read-aloud supports all learners in building basic background knowledge.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debriefing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn and talk after reading aloud each learning target:

*   "I can describe the information from images about the universal appeal of Shakespeare."

*   "I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from images."

  • Distribute the Advantages/Disadvantages T-chart and explain that students will have an opportunity to think about and write about their learning from images and text for homework. Orient them to the handout and clarify as needed.

Homework

Homework
  • Complete the Advantages/Disadvantages T-chart. 

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