End of Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Commentary | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U3:L4

End of Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Commentary

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)
  • I can create a presentation, artwork, or text in response to a literary work with a commentary that identifies connections and explains divergences from the original. (W.8.11)
  • I can create poetry, stories, and other literary forms. (W.8.11b)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain how our script is a response to To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can explain how our script connects to the novel and how it diverges from it and why.
  • I can use a rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Commentary

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Feedback (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  End of Unit 3 Assessment (20 minutes)

B.  Peer Critique (12 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Group Work: Brainstorm Visuals (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Gather the props you have recorded on your index card for your final Readers Theater performance.

B.  Take home your script and practice reading your parts, considering the feedback given in the peer critique.

  • In this lesson, students complete an on-demand end of unit assessment. They are required to write a commentary to answer specific questions about the connections between their script and the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Students prepared for this in Lesson 3 by completing a Venn diagram of the similarities and differences between their script and the novel.
  • Assess student responses on the end of unit assessment using the Grade 8 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.
  • Note that students practice briefly in front of another group at the end of this lesson. This is to help them get more comfortable performing and to receive peer critique to help them improve their performances. To ensure that this is carried out productively without hurting anyone's feelings, set clear expectations by reviewing the Peer Critique Guidelines beforehand.
  • At the end of this lesson, students consider props and visuals they can use to help their audience better understand their interpretation of the text. In choosing props and visuals, they have to make decisions like a director, based on the message they are trying to convey.
  • In advance: Copy each group script for each member of the group.
  • Post: Learning targets; Key Quotes anchor charts (from Unit 2, Lesson 8).

Vocabulary

response, diverges; commentary, peer critique

Materials

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Commentary (one per student)
  • Lined paper (two pieces per student)
  • Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 14)
  • Row 1 of Readers Theater rubric (one per student)
  • Peer Critique Guidelines (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Index cards (one per group)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Feedback (5 minutes)

  • Hand back the Mid-Unit 3 Assessments and invite students to spend time silently reading and digesting your feedback.
  • Invite them to write their name on the board if they have questions, so that you can follow up either immediately or later on in the lesson.
  • Giving students the opportunity to review assessment feedback helps them understand where and how they need to improve next time.

B. Unpacking Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Invite the class to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can explain how our script is a response to To Kill a Mockingbird."

*   "I can explain how our script connects to the novel and how it diverges from it and why."

*   "I can use a rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What does it mean by explaining how your script is a response to To Kill a Mockingbird?"

  • Listen for students to explain that it means how the script communicates a particular idea from the novel.
  • Ask:

*   "What does diverges mean?"

  • Listen for students to explain that it means "is separate" or "differs from," so in this context it refers to how the script is different from the novel and why.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit Assessment (20 minutes)

  • Remind students that the idea of this Readers Theater is to communicate a key quote, outlining a theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, by choosing specific scenes in the book that communicate that key quote and turning them into scripts for Readers Theater. Also, remind students that when presenting a Readers Theater, they need to be able to justify their choices to their audience and that in the mid-unit assessment, they explained why they made that scene selection and justified the scripting in reference to the key quote.             
  • Distribute the End of Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Commentary. Focus students on the title. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What is a commentary?"

  • Listen for students to explain that a commentary is a kind of explanation of something that provides details about the choices made and why those choices were made.
  • Invite the class to read the prompt with you.
  • Remind students that they completed a Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between the Readers Theater Script and To Kill a Mockingbird in the previous lesson comparing their script and the novel that they can use to help them explain how and why the script connects to and diverges from the novel.
  • Also, remind students that in an assessment, they have to work independently without talking to other students. Guide students to refer to their novel, to their Readers Theater scripts, and to their Venn diagrams to write a commentary for their whole group Readers Theater that answers the questions.
  • Distribute lined paper and tell students to begin writing their commentary.
  • Collect the end of unit assessments at the end of the allotted time.

B. Peer Critique (15 minutes)

  • Refer students back to the Performance column on the Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart. Invite the class to read the criteria again.
  • Tell students that they are going to practice performing in front of another group and watching another group perform their Readers Theater to peer-critique each other's performance.
  • Distribute Row 1 of the Readers Theater rubric to each group. Tell them that this is one row of the rubric you will use to assess their final performance task and that they are going to use it to peer-critique the performance of another group. Give students a couple of minutes to read it through.
  • Explain that peer critiquing must be done carefully because we want to be helpful to our peers so they can use our suggestions to improve their work. We don't want to make them feel bad. Post the Peer Critique Guidelines:
  1. Be kind: Always treat others with dignity and respect. This means we never use words that are hurtful, including sarcasm.
  2. Be specific: Focus on particular strengths and weaknesses, rather than making general comments like "It's good" or "I like it." Provide insight into why it is good or what, specifically, you like about it.
  3. Be helpful: The goal is to positively contribute to the individual or the group, not to simply be heard. Echoing the thoughts of others or cleverly pointing out details that are irrelevant wastes time.
  4. Participate: Peer critique is a process to support each other, and your feedback is valued.
  • Pair up two different student groups. Tell groups which one will perform first and which will be the audience first. Remind the audience that they are to give feedback using Row 1 of the rubric.
  • Ask the first groups to begin. Circulate to support as needed as they perform and their peers give feedback.
  • Once the first group has finished performing and the other group has finished writing feedback, invite the groups to switch so that the audience becomes the performers.
  • Tell groups to hand over their feedback and to carefully read through each of the peer critiques they have been given from the other group so that they know how to improve for their final performance.
  • Critiques simulate the experiences students will have in the workplace and help build a culture of achievement in your classroom.
  • Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both parties in clarifying the meaning of the learning target. 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Group Work: Brainstorm Visuals (6 minutes)

  • Distribute an index card to each group. Tell students that props and visuals can help an audience better understand their interpretation of the text and contribute to the audience's understanding of characters, setting, problem, and/or mood.
  • Tell them that, like directors, they need to make decisions about what types of props and/or visuals they want to use for the group performances of their group's narrative script during the final performance task in the next lesson. Ask groups to discuss:

*   "Which props or visuals will help your audience better understand your interpretation of the novel and the message (key quote) you are trying to communicate through your script? How will they help?"                 

  • Prompt students to think about the scenes in their scripts and where the characters may be, what they are doing or wearing, and/or what challenges they are facing.
  • Tell group members to decide who will be responsible for bringing in each prop for the final performance task in the next lesson and ask them to record that on their index card to take home.

Homework

Homework
  • Gather the props you have recorded on your index card for your final Readers Theater performance.
  • Take home your script and practice reading your parts, considering the feedback given in the peer critique.

Teaching Note: Assess student responses on the end of unit assessment using the Grade 8 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up