Readers Theater: Writing a Conclusion | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U3:L3

Readers Theater: Writing a Conclusion

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.8.3)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.8.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can work with my group to write a conclusion to our script that summarizes the key events and draws the audience attention back to the key quote.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Readers Theater script revisions
  • Conclusion for group script
  • Performance practice feedback
  • Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between the Readers Theater Script and To Kill a Mockingbird

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  End of Unit 2 Assessment Feedback (8 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Target (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Group Work: Writing a Group Conclusion 
(20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between the Readers Theater Script and To Kill a Mockingbird (15 minutes)

4.  Homework

  • In advance: Students will need their scripts in the correct order from Lesson 2.
  • In this lesson, groups write a conclusion for their script. Note that this may be challenging to do as a group, so first they review a model and then they orally rehearse a conclusion together before writing. Remind groups of the norms they created in Lesson 14 of Unit 2.
  • The Venn diagram that students fill out at the end of this lesson is in preparation for their end of unit assessment in the next lesson, in which they write a commentary on how their script is a response to To Kill a Mockingbird and how it connects to and diverges from the novel.
  • Post: Learning target; and Peer Critique Guidelines (see supporting materials).

Vocabulary

diverge

Materials

  • End of Unit 2 Assessments (from Unit 2, Lesson 16; with teacher feedback and rubric)
  • Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 14)
  • Document camera
  • Model script conclusion (one for display)
  • Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between the Readers Theater Script and To Kill a Mockingbird (one per student and one for display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 2 Assessment Feedback (8 minutes)

  • Hand back the End of Unit 2 Assessments and invite students to spend time reading your feedback.
  • Invite them to write their name on the board if they have questions, so that you can follow up either immediately or later on in the lesson.
  • Giving students the opportunity to review assessment feedback helps them understand where and how they need to improve next time.

B. Unpacking Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Invite the class to read the learning target with you:

*   "I can work with my group to write a conclusion to our script that summarizes the key events and draws the audience attention back to the key quote."

  • Ask:

*   "What do you think you will be doing in this lesson based on this learning target?"

  • Cold call students for their responses and listen for them to explain that they will be writing a conclusion for their Readers Theater script.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Group Work: Writing a Group Conclusion (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they will be working with their group members to write a single conclusion to their full narrative group script. 
  • Explain that the conclusion should summarize the events of the narrative, draw them to a close, and refocus the audience's attention on the theme of the narrative, which is the key quote. Point that students should continue to make sure they are meeting the criteria that is listed on the Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart.
  • Using a document camera, display the Model Script Conclusion and read it aloud.
  • Ask:

*   "What do you notice about the conclusion?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for students to say that the conclusion is said by the narrator and that it brings the audience back to the main idea of the key quote, which is that growing up is about more than getting older--it is about becoming more mature in the way you handle what the world throws at you.
  • Ask students to discuss in their Readers Theater groups:

*   "How does the conclusion summarize the events of the narrative?"

*   "How does it remind the audience of the key quote?" 

  • Cold call students to share their group discussions with the whole class.
  • Leave the model posted and invite groups to begin by orally rehearsing their conclusions. Remind them to refer to their group norms from Unit 2, Lesson 14. Circulate to assist those who are struggling. Ask:

*   "How does your conclusion summarize the events of the narrative?"

*   "How does it remind the audience of the key quote?" 

  • Ask students to allocate someone to write the conclusion down for their group script on a separate sheet of paper. 
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially those who are challenged.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between the Readers Theater Script and To Kill a Mockingbird (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to discuss in teams:

*   "How is your whole group Readers Theater script like the same scenes in the novel? How is it different? Why is it different?"

  • Display and distribute Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between the Readers Theater Script and To Kill a Mockingbird. Remind students that on a Venn diagram, the things that are similar go in the middle and the things that are unique go in the circles on either side.
  • Model how to fill it out using the model script. Similarities (in the middle):

*   The dialogue between Atticus and Jem is exactly what they say in the book (285).

*   The dialogue between Miss Maudie and Jem is exactly what they say in the book (288-289).

*   The narrator in the book says exactly: "This was a thought. Court-appointed defenses were usually given to Maxwell Green, Maycomb's latest addition to the bar, who needed the experience. Maxwell Green should have had Tom Robinson's case."

  • Differences:

*   Script: The first narrator line analyzes how Jem is starting to grow up, which doesn't happen in the novel.

*   Script: The stage directions are meant for the actors to do certain things, as described in the novel (but in the novel they aren't stage directions). 

*   Novel: The narrator in the novel is Scout, whereas the narrator in this scene of the script is not Scout (as an adult).

  • Ask groups to discuss:

*   "How does your script connect to the novel? How is it similar?"

*   "How does your script diverge from the novel? How it is different?"

  • Invite students to fill out their own Venn diagrams based on their discussion.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish your Venn diagram.
  • Continue independent reading.

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