Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Scene Selection Justification and Peer Critique | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U3:L1

Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Scene Selection Justification and Peer Critique

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.8.5)
  • I can use evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research. (W.8.9a)
  • I can create poetry, stories, and other literary forms. (W.8.11b)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain why I chose my scene from To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I can explain how my script develops the main idea of the key quote.
  • I can use the rubric to provide feedback to my peers.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Scene Selection: Justification 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Collecting End of Unit 2 Assessments (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (15 minutes)

B.  Peer Critique of Draft Scripts (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Revising Scripts (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Finish revising your Readers Theater script based on the stars and steps from the peer critique.

  • Although this is the first official lesson of Unit 3, students began preparing for the research portion of this unit in Unit 2, Lessons 14 and 15.  Thus in effect this is the third lesson of this unit.
  • In this lesson, students complete an on-demand mid-unit assessment. The questions posed in the assessment have been discussed at length in previous lessons, so students should be able to answer them confidently.
  • At the end of the lesson, students peer-critique the script of another member of their Readers Theater group against the Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart. To ensure that this is carried out productively without hurting anyone's feelings, set clear expectations by reviewing the Peer Critique Guidelines beforehand.
  • Assess student responses on the mid-unit assessment using the Grade 8 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.
  • In advance: Prepare and post a chart with the Peer Critique Guidelines or be ready to distribute a copy of the guidelines for students to keep in their folders (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets; Key Quotes anchor charts

Vocabulary

Readers Theater

Materials

  • Key Quotes anchor charts (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 8)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Readers Theater Scene Selection: Justification (one per student)
  • Peer Critique Guidelines (one to display)
  • Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 14)
  • Stars and Steps recording form (one per student)
  • Grade 8 2-Point Rubric--Short Response (from Unit 1, Lesson 7; see teaching note)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Collecting End of Unit 2 Assessments (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that their homework assignment was to finish the final draft of their End of Unit 2 Assessment essay. Collect the final draft of the essays, along with the first draft, rubric, and planners.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can explain why I chose my scene from To Kill a Mockingbird."

*   "I can explain how my script develops the main idea of the key quote."

*   "I can use the rubric to provide feedback to my peers."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What does it mean by 'develops the main idea of the key quote'?"

  • Listen for students to explain that the idea/message in the quote needs to be clearly communicated through the script.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that the idea of this Readers Theater is to communicate a key quote, as they have done on the Key Quotes anchor charts outlining a theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, by choosing specific scenes in the book that convey that key quote and turning them into scripts.  
  • Explain that when presenting a Readers Theater, they need to be able to justify their choices to their audience. They need to be able to explain why they made that scene selection and to justify the scripting in reference to the main theme, which in this case is presented as a key quote. They also need to be able to explain how their script communicates the key quote.
  • Distribute the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Justifying My Scene Selection and Scripting.
  • Give students a couple of minutes to read through the questions on the handout and to ask any clarifying questions.
  • Remind them that in an assessment, they have to work independently without talking to other students. Also remind them to refer to their draft Readers Theater scripts to answer the questions.
  • Tell the students to begin.
  • Collect the assessments at the end of the time allotted.

B. Peer Critique of Draft Scripts (15 minutes)

  • Explain that peer critiquing must be done carefully because we want to be helpful to our peers so they can use our suggestions to improve their work. We don't want to make them feel bad. Post or distribute the Peer Critique Guidelines:
  1. Be kind: Always treat others with dignity and respect. This means we never use words or tones that are hurtful, including sarcasm.
  2. Be specific: Focus on particular strengths and weaknesses, rather than making general comments like "It's good" or "I like it." Provide insight into why it is good or what, specifically, you like about it.
  3. Be helpful: The goal is to positively contribute to the individual or the group, not to simply be heard. Echoing the thoughts of others or cleverly pointing out details that are irrelevant wastes time.
  • Participate: Peer critique is a process to support each other, and your feedback is valued.
  • Distinguish peer critique from proofreading. It is fine if they catch errors in each other's work. But the goal is to make the thinking in the writing as strong as possible.
  • Tell students that they will present feedback in the form of stars and steps. They will give two "stars" and two "steps." When looking at their partner's work, they are going to be using the criteria in the Script column of the Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart.
  • Briefly model how to give two "kind, specific, helpful" stars. Be sure to connect your comments directly to the criteria on the anchor chart. For example:
  • *   "You have used quotes from the novel, and the dialogue is in the style and tone of the speech in the novel too."

  • Repeat, briefly modeling how to give two "kind, specific, helpful" steps. For example:
  • *   "Have you thought about including this part of the scene from the novel? I see it is missing from your script, but I think it helps develop the main idea of the quote. In some places I'm not sure who is speaking because there isn't a character name at the beginning of the line. Can you add the character names?"

  • Emphasize that it is especially important to be kind when giving steps. Asking a question of the writer is often a good way to do this. "I wonder if ...?" "Have you thought about ...?"
  • Invite students to consider a question they would like their peer to consider when critiquing their work. Give them an example:
  • *   "How can I make sure the audience understands that Jem is angry here?"

  • Ask them to write their question at the top of their script.
  • Distribute the Stars and Steps recording form. Explain that today, students will record the stars and steps for their partner on this sheet so that their partner can remember the feedback he or she receives. They are to write the name of their partner at the top of their paper.
  • Invite students to pair up within Readers Theater teams or with other students working on the same key quote. Invite pairs to swap scripts and to spend 3 minutes reading them in silence.
  • Ask students to record stars and steps for their partner on the recording form. This form is designed to help them remember the feedback they want to give to their partner from the peer critique.
  • Circulate to assist those who may struggle with recording their feedback,to ensure students are following the Peer Critique Guidelines, and to reinforce expectations.
  • Ask students to return the script and Stars and Steps recording form to their partner and to explain the stars and steps they recorded. Give them an opportunity to question their partner if they don't understand the stars and steps they have been given.
  • Peer critiques simulate the experiences students will have in the workplace and help build a culture of achievement in your classroom.
  • Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both students in clarifying the meaning of the learning target.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Revising Scripts (7 minutes)

Invite students to begin revising their scripts based on the stars and steps from the peer critique.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish revising your Readers Theater script based on the stars and steps from the peer critique.

Note: Assess student responses on the mid-unit assessment using the Grade 8 2-Point Rubric--Short Response

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