Four Corners: Taking a Stand in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapters 24-26, plus synthesis of scenes in previous chapters) | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U2:L8

Four Corners: Taking a Stand in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapters 24-26, plus synthesis of scenes in previous chapters)

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how taking a stand is developed in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for Chapters 24-26 (from homework)
  • Four Corners
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader and Previewing Learning Targets: Focus Question from Homework (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Integrity: Frayer Model (10 minutes)

B. Analyzing Taking a Stand: Four Corners (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Complete a first read of Chapter 27. Take notes with the Structured Notes graphic organizer.

  • In this lesson, the class will complete a Frayer model for the word integrity, a key idea in the novel. Understanding integrity is integral to understanding Atticus's character. It is also deeply connected to taking a stand and the Golden Rule.
  • Students will also engage with the key quotes for the performance assessment in a Four Corners activity in which they use the quotes as a lens to understand why characters in the novel take a stand. This will help them connect taking a stand to the quotes that they have already examined that illustrate integrity, caring for those who are weak or innocent, standing up for what you believe in even if you are unlikely to succeed, and seeing things from another person's perspective.
  • In advance: Create key quote anchor charts.
  • In advance: Prepare the Taking a Stand sentence strips (use the completed Taking a Stand anchor chart to create examples--multiple students having the same example would be ideal.
  • Review: Four Corners protocol (Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

integrity

Materials

  • Atticus Note-catcher (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 9)
  • Document camera
  • Integrity: Frayer Model (one per student and one for display)
  • Key Quotes handout (one per student and one for display)
  • Key Quotes anchor charts (new; teacher-created)
  • Taking a Stand sentence strips (one per student; new, teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Taking a Stand Anchor Chart (Model for Teacher Reference)
  • Four Corners Possible Responses (for Teacher Reference)
  • Tape (one per anchor chart)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird (book; one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapter 27 (one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Supported Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapter 27 (optional; for students needing additional support)
  • Exit Ticket (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader and Previewing Learning Targets: Focus Question from Homework (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to find a new discussion partner and share their responses to the focus question from homework. Cold call students to share. Invite them to add this information to their Atticus Note-catcher.
  • Cold call a student to read the learning targets.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Integrity: Frayer Model (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Integrity: Frayer Model handout to students and display using a document camera. Orient students to each of the four boxes and explain that they will be learning about integrity and will use this Frayer Model organizer to help them.
  • Draw students' attention to the Examples box in the lower left corner of the chart. Ask:

*   "What are some examples of showing integrity in the novel or in life?"

  • Examples of integrity from life or society might include huge public actions, like Martin Luther King Jr., or much smaller actions, like returning a found wallet to its owner. Integrity appeals to ethical principles that look to a common good, not just what is good for you. Integrity often requires thinking deeply about one's actions and how they affect others. Explain that in the novel, Atticus needing to defend Tom Robinson so he could live with himself is a strong example of integrity.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner to come up with another example from the novel and from real life. Listen for students to mention that Mrs. Dubose felt she had to die beholden to nobody and overcame her addiction to painkillers, Mr. Underwood writing the editorial comparing Tom's death to the "senseless slaughter of songbirds," etc. Real-life examples could include standing up to a bully on someone else's behalf or informing a server that he or she has left something off your bill at a restaurant.
  • Next, draw students' attention to the Definition box in the upper left corner and invite them to turn and talk about what integrity means. Remind them that this was a vocabulary word from Chapter 20, Atticus's closing statements. Cold call several pairs to share out a definition and write something like: "Integrity means sticking to a moral or ethical code."
  • Next, draw students' attention to the box labeled Characteristics/Explanation in the upper right corner of the handout. Ask:

*   "What characteristics, or qualities, does a person have who has integrity?"

  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner and listen for them to say characteristics like: courage, conviction, strong beliefs, and doing what you believe is right. Integrity is "walking the talk"--living and acting the way you believe is right. Probe by asking students what sort of characteristics the people, both real and fictional, display in the Examples box. Cold call several pairs to share.
  • If students mention Mr. Dolphous Raymond, point out that he compromises to live his life, but he does not go back on his ethical principles, so he is still living with integrity. 
  • Finally, draw students' attention to the box labeled Non-Examples in the lower right corner. Ask: * "What are non-examples of integrity?"
  • Encourage students to think about the definition and the characteristics listed on the handout and remind them that they are thinking about the opposite of this. Listen for them to talk about non-examples like: following the crowd or giving in to peer pressure; not following your moral or ethical principles; the teacher's hypocrisy about Hitler and her acceptance of racism in Maycomb; Bob Ewell. Probe by asking:

    *   "How are the deeply held beliefs of the mob outside the jailhouse, or Bob Ewell, or Hitler different from 'integrity'? Are these examples of people working for the common good?"

  • Cold call pairs and record the non-examples.

  • Explain that the idea of integrity will be important in upcoming lessons. It is closely related to the ideas of taking a stand and the Golden Rule.

B. Analyzing Taking a Stand: Four Corners (25 minutes)

  • Post the Key Quotes anchor charts in four corners of the room. Distribute and display the Key Quotes handout.
  • Cold call students to read each key quote. Explain that today they will revisit the various stands they've read about in the novel and try to categorize them under one of the four quotes. Each quote represents a different reason someone might take a stand. For example, Quote A could be seen as not hurting the innocent, or even protecting the innocent. Make sure students annotate their handout with these gist statements.
  • Ask them to turn and talk with a neighbor about how we might summarize Quote B. Listen for them to mention that Quote B is about seeing things from other people's perspective. Cold call partners to share their thinking and remind them to annotate their handout with these gist statements.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with a neighbor about how we might summarize Quote C. Listen for them to mention that Quote C is about doing what is right even though you know you can't succeed. Cold call partners to share their thinking and remind students to record the gist statement on their handouts.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with a neighbor about how we might summarize Quote D. Listen for them to mention that Quote D is about maintaining integrity so you can live with yourself. Cold call partners to share their thinking and have students record the gist statement on their handouts.
  • Provide each student with a Taking a Stand sentence strip featuring a stand taken by a character from the Taking a Stand anchor chart. There will be two or more students with the same stand. Explain that they should take a few moments to read the stand, think about why the character took the stand, and then review the quotes on the Key Quotes handout to determine which quote best represents why the character might have taken a stand.
  • Students should write a brief explanation under the quote to explain their thinking. They may find that more than one reason could apply to their stand, but they should choose the one they think is a good reason with strong critical thinking.
  • Direct students' attention the Key Quotes anchor charts in the four corners of the room. Give the following directions:
  1. Proceed to the anchor chart you think represents a good reason the character took the stand that you are holding.
  2. Share sentence strips with your group and explain why your scene belongs on this chart.
  3. Group share with whole class.
  4.   Carousel review of other charts.

  • Remind students to move safely and quietly. Circulate and monitor conversations, listening for explanations that are logical. Listen for students identifying the various stands as examples of integrity, standing up for others who are weak or innocent, standing up even though you know you can't win, or taking a stand because you see someone else's perspective.
  • After sharing their stands and explanations and listening to others in the group share theirs, some students may feel that their stand belongs with another quote. After 5 minutes, invite students to move to a different quote if they have changed their minds based on their discussions. Give students a few more minutes to finish up their conversations about their examples. Then direct them to post their stands on their anchor chart using tape.
  • Once all students have posted their stands, ask:

*   "What examples did you choose to put on your anchor chart?"

  • Cold call a student from each group to share the groups' thinking.
  • Then invite groups to rotate to each anchor chart to review where others posted their examples. This should be a silent activity. When they return to their original anchor charts, invite students to briefly turn and talk about any surprises, new ideas, or confirmations.
  • Ask:

*   "Were there any surprises after listening to the other groups' thinking and seeing their charts?"

  • Cold call students to share their surprises. They may have been surprised to note that another student with the same stand may have chosen a different quote.
  • Ask:

*   "What learning or thinking was confirmed after listening to groups and seeing their charts?"

  • Cold call students to share what was confirmed for them. Taking a stand is complicated and deeply connected to integrity.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

  • Hand out the exit ticket and invite students to answer the question. Collect the tickets.
  • Distribute the To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapter 27. Preview the homework.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Complete a first read of Chapter 27 with structured notes. Answer the focus question:
  • Reread Atticus's explanation of Bob Ewell's actions on page 251, beginning with 'I think I understand ...' and ending with 'Atticus chuckled.' What does Atticus's explanation reveal about his character? Use the strongest evidence from the novel to support your answer."
  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the novel.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up