Making Inferences: Analyzing Atticus (Chapters 22-23) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U2:L7

Making Inferences: Analyzing Atticus (Chapters 22-23)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for my analysis of literary text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can support my inferences about Chapters 22 and 23 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can analyze what other characters' dialogue about Atticus reveals about his character.
  • I can analyze how Atticus's words and actions reveal his character.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for Chapters 22 and 23 (from homework)
  • Vocabulary Squares
  • Written Conversation Note-catcher
  • Chapter 23 Text-Dependent Questions Note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Vocabulary Square (5 minutes)

2.   Work Time

A. Coming to Terms with the Outcome of the Trial: Written Conversation (15 minutes)

B. Close Reading: Atticus Explains Things (20 minutes)

3.   Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework: Atticus Note-catcher (5 minutes)

4.   Homework

A. Complete a first read of Chapters 24-26 with structured notes.

  • In this lesson, students will use the Written Conversation protocol to synthesize the various reactions of characters to the verdict.
  • They will also continue to analyze Atticus's character through carefully chosen examples of his dialogue as he tries to help his children understand the trial and their town. Text-dependent questions will help students better understand Atticus's character.
  • A sample version of the Atticus Note-catcher is in Unit 2, Lesson 10.
  • In advance: Decide which Discussion Appointment to use today.
  • Review: Written Conversation protocol (see Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

cynical (287), fatalistic, ruefully (288), wryly (292), furtive (293), commutes (293), vehement (296)

Materials

  • Vocabulary Square (one per student)
  • Written Conversation: Chapters 22 and 23 Note-catcher (one per student and one for display)
  • Document camera
  • Chapter 23 Text-Dependent Questions Note-catcher (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide: Rereading To Kill a Mockingbird Pages 291-298 (for Teacher Reference)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird (book; one per student)
  • Atticus Note-catcher (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 9)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapters 24-26 (one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Supported Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapters 24-26 (optional; for students needing additional support)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Vocabulary Square (5 minutes)

  • Students should sit with their selected Discussion Appointment partner. Be sure that they have their structured notes from their homework and distribute a Vocabulary Square to each student. Invite them to work with their partner to choose a word they defined from the homework and complete the vocabulary square like the one modeled in Lesson 6. Pairs may work together, but they should each complete their own square.
  • Circulate and monitor students as they work. Collect the Vocabulary Squares as a formative assessment. Consider displaying student examples of each word from the chapter.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and cold call someone to read them aloud.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Coming to Terms with the Outcome of the Trial: Written Conversation (15 minutes)

  • Distribute the Written Conversation Note-catcher and display a copy on the document camera. Explain that in a written conversation, students will write simultaneous notes to their partner about the reading selection, swapping them every 2 or 3 minutes for a total of two exchanges back and forth, keeping quiet along the way. They are to write for the whole time allotted for each note, putting down words, phrases, questions, connections, ideas, wonderings--anything related to the passage or responding to what their partner has said, just as they would in an out-loud conversation. Spelling and grammar do not count; these are just notes. However, these notes do need to be focused and text-based.
  • Display the prompt for the written conversation:

*     "Characters have very different reactions in the aftermath of the verdict. How do different characters react? Choose Jem, the black community, Miss Maudie, Bob Ewell, or Dill to write about. What do these reactions reveal about that character or group?"

  • As students are writing, circulate and monitor. Look for them to identify various reactions: Jem is disenchanted; the black community brings food as a thank you even though Atticus didn't win; Miss Maudie explains that Atticus has to do the right thing for the whole town; Bob Ewell threatens Atticus and spits on him; Dill decides he is going to be a clown when he's grown because all you can do is laugh at folks. Probe with questions such as these:

*     "What does this reaction reveal about that character?"

*     "What character trait does that reaction show?"

*     "What do Miss Maudie's words reveal about her and about Atticus?"

*     "What does Atticus's reaction to the generosity of the black community reveal about him?"

  • Once the exchanges are done, cold call pairs to share an important observation or idea from their written conversation. Encourage other students to build off of those ideas in a classroom discussion.
  • For students who struggle, consider providing sentence or paragraph frames to begin the written conversation so students can write about what they read.

B. Close Reading: Atticus Explains Things (20 minutes)

  • Distribute the Chapter 23 Text-Dependent Questions Note-catcher and invite students to take out their copies of To Kill a Mockingbird. Tell them that they are now going to take time to reread a key scene from Chapter 23 (pages 291-298).
  • See Close Reading Guide: Rereading To Kill a Mockingbird Pages 291-298 (for Teacher Reference; in supporting materials) to guide this part of Work Time. 
  • To support students' thinking, consider providing a teacher think-aloud about how you came to the conclusions about the close reading questions.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to take out their Atticus Note-catcher. They should Think-Write-Pair-Share with their Discussion Appointment partner additional examples to add to the Note-catcher.
  • Distribute the To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapters 24-26. Preview the homework.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read and complete the Structured Notes Chapters 24-26. Answer the focus question:

*   What are two things the reader learns about Atticus's character in these chapters? Use the strongest evidence from the novel to support your answer."

 

Note: Create anchor charts with "key quotes" for Lesson 8.

  • Provide struggling students with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the novel.

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