Launching the Reader’s Theater Groups and Allocating Key Quotes and Scenes | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U2:L14

Launching the Reader’s Theater Groups and Allocating Key Quotes and Scenes

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot). (RL.8.2)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can describe what Readers Theater is and list criteria of Readers Theater.
  • I can work effectively with a group to create group norms to make group discussion and collaborative work productive and enjoyable.
  • I can work effectively with a group to allocate a scene to each person in the group.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Exit ticket: My Key Quote and Scene

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

A. Sharing Homework: Scenes That Communicate Key Quotes (6 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A. Studying the Prompt (10 minutes)

B. Launch Readers Theater Groups (10 minutes)

C. Allocating Key Quotes (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket: My Key Quote and Scene (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A. Read through the scene for which you will be writing a Readers Theater script and use evidence flags to mark the dialogue in that scene.

  • Although this lesson is in Unit 2, it is actually the kickoff for Unit 3. This is to give you time to look over the draft end of unit assessments before handing them back to students with feedback in Lesson 16.
  • Students may be familiar with Readers Theater already. If so, ask them to help you generate the criteria for Readers Theater. If not, you may need to give them the criteria (in the body of the lesson, during Work Time A).
  • In this lesson, students are put into groups for Readers Theater, and one of the key quotes from Lesson 8 is allocated to each group. Students then work in their groups to give each group member a different scene from the anchor chart for which he or she will write a Readers Theater script. It is important that each individual works on a different scene; otherwise, there will be multiple versions of the same scene in the final Readers Theater, which will be confusing. Groups may need assistance allocating scenes to individuals.
  • In advance: Organize students into groups of three or four and assign each group a key quote. Mixed-ability grouping of students will provide a collaborative and supportive structure.
  • Post: Learning targets and Key Quotes anchor charts (from Lesson 8).

Vocabulary

Readers Theater, effectively, norms, collaborative, productive

Materials

  • Equity sticks
  • Key Quotes anchor charts (from Lesson 8)
  • Performance Task Prompt (one per student and one for display)
  • Model Readers Theater One-Scene Script (one per student and one to display)
  • Readers Theater Criteria Anchor Chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see Supporting Materials)
  • Chart paper (one piece per group)
  • Marker (one per group)
  • Exit ticket: My Key Quote and Scene (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing Homework: Scenes That Communicate Key Quotes (6 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they were to choose two scenes from Chapter 27 onward of To Kill a Mockingbird that communicate each of the key quotes.
  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their scene and to explain how that scene communicates the key quote. Record the scenes on the appropriate Key Quotes anchor charts.
  • Opening with activities linked to homework holds students accountable for completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can describe what Readers Theater is and list criteria of Readers Theater."

*   "I can work effectively with a group to create group norms to make group discussion and collaborative work productive and enjoyable."

*   "I can work effectively with a group to allocate a scene to each person in the group."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What is a Readers Theater?"

  • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for students to explain that Readers Theater is very basic theater. There are many styles of Readers Theater. Students may not know this, so you may have to tell them.
  • Ask:

*   "What does work effectively mean?"

  • Select volunteers to share responses. Listen for students to explain that to work effectively means to work well together.
  • Ask:

*   "What are norms? Why do we make norms?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that norms are positive behaviors that help groups work well together.
  • Ask:

*    "What is collaborative work?"

  • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for students to explain that collaborative work is working with others.
  • Ask:

*    "What does productive mean?"

  • Listen for students to explain that productive means to do a lot of good work in a short span of time.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying the Prompt (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that while you are looking over their draft essays to provide feedback, they are going to begin working on Unit 3. Display and distribute the Performance Task Prompt.
  • Invite students to read along silently in their heads as you read it aloud.
  • Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "So what are you going to be doing for your performance task?"

  • Listen for students to explain that they are going to write a Readers Theater script for a scene of the book that best represents that quote. They are then going to combine their script with the scripts of the other people in their group who have worked on scenes for the same quote, write a conclusion for their group Readers Theater, and then perform it. Explain that students will combine their individual scripts in chronological order, just as the scenes occur in the book.
  • Display and distribute the Model Readers Theater One-Scene Script and invite students to spend a couple of minutes reading through it so they can get an idea of what a Readers Theater script looks like.
  • Tell students that Readers Theater was developed as an easy and good way to present literature in dramatic form. Most scripts are adapted from literature.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What are some criteria for Readers Theater performances?"

  • Record student suggestions in the second column, Performance, of the new Readers Theater Criteria anchor chart. Make sure the following are included:
  • There is a narrator to help frame the dramatic presentation.
  • No full stage sets. If used at all, sets are simple.
  • No full costumes. If used at all, costumes just suggest the feel of the characters. Or the costumes are really basic or all the same.
  • No full memorization. Scripts are used openly in performance. "How will you use the novel and informational texts?"
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Anchor charts serve as Note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas.

B. Launch Readers Theater Groups (10 minutes)

  • Post the Readers Theater groups and read through them so all students know which group they are in. Invite students to get into those groups.
  • Remind students that when they start working in a new group, it is a good idea to create some group norms to make sure that group discussion and collaborative work is productive and enjoyable for everyone.
  • Hand out a piece of chart paper and a marker to each group.
  • Circulate to help groups think of norms. Ask guiding questions:

*   "How can you make sure you have productive group discussions? What do you each need to do? Why?"

*   "How can you make sure everyone gets a chance to share his or her ideas and be heard?"

  • Asking groups to write group norms makes them think about criteria for successful teamwork and provides a guide to refer to when they find teamwork challenging and need support.

C. Allocating Key Quotes (10 minutes)

  • Focus students on the Performance Task Prompt, specifically the list of Key Quotes spoken by Atticus. Remind them of the Key Quotes anchor charts they created in Lesson 8 about these four quotes. Assign each group one of the four key quotes and tell them that they are going to be writing their Readers Theater for scenes that convey that quote.
  • Ask students to discuss in their Readers Theater groups:

*   "What is the main idea of your quote?"

  • Invite students to spend 5 minutes reading through the scenes (already recorded on their key quote anchor chart from Lesson 8) and then reading those scenes in context in the novel.
  • Ask students to discuss in their Readers Theater groups:

*   "How does each scene communicate the main idea of your key quote?"

  • Tell students that to make their group Readers Theater performance a strong representation of that quote, within their group they need to: 1) identify the scenes from the list that best communicate that quote, and 2) each select a different scene to work on and then combine those scenes into one with a conclusion. Emphasize that if two students within the group choose the same scene to work on, the final Readers Theater piece could be quite confusing and boring to watch. Remind students that in later lessons they will combine their scripts in chronological order, just as the scenes occur in the book.
  • Ask groups to discuss:

*   "Which of the scenes recorded on the key quote chart are the most successful at communicating the key quote? Why?"

  • Remind groups of their norms chart; circulate to assist groups that are struggling to identify the most successful scenes.
  • Give groups 5 minutes to decide who is going to work on which of the scenes that they have identified as the most successful at communicating the key quote. Remind groups of their norms chart and circulate to remind groups that each student needs to work on a different scene.
  • If a group begins to argue over which scenes students are going to work on, allocate a scene to each student in that group. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: My Key Quote and Scene (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the exit ticket: My Key Quote and Scene. Tell students to record on the exit ticket their key quote and the scene they are going to be working on.
  • Collect the exit tickets and check that each student in a group is working on a different scene for his or her key quote.
  • Using exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Read through the scene for which you will be writing a Readers Theater script and use evidence flags to mark the dialogue in that scene.

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