World Cafe: Analyzing Sojourner Truth "Ain't I a Woman?" | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L6

World Cafe: Analyzing Sojourner Truth "Ain't I a Woman?"

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine a theme or the central ideas of informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize an informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the development of a central idea in "Ain't I a Woman?"
  • I can analyze the structure of a paragraph, including the role of particular sentences, in "Ain't I a Woman?"
  • I can analyze Sojourner Truth's perspective in "Ain't I a Woman?" 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Summary Writing graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader: Vocabulary in "Equal Rights for Women" (5 minutes)

 B. Review Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Introduce "Ain't I a Woman?" (7 minutes)

 B. World Cafe: Analyzing "Ain't I a Woman?" (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Preparing for Summary Writing (5 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Write a summary paragraph of "Ain't I a Woman?"

  • The text-dependent questions in this lesson are based heavily on the Making Evidence-Based Claims units developed by Odell Education. For the original Odell Education units, go to www.odelleducation.com/resources.
  • World Cafe is a protocol that promotes discussion and leadership in students. The first round and the first transition need very clear direction. After that, students tend to pick up the protocol quickly. Consider posting the steps for World Cafe on the board or chart paper where students can see them.
  • For the purposes of this lesson, the World Cafe protocol is modified to give students time to think on their own before talking to their group.
  • The goal of this lesson is to give students another opportunity to practice the skills that will be assessed on the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment in the next lesson.
  • Previously, students have used the Summary Writing graphic organizer to prepare their ideas to write summaries. In this module, summary writing will be much less scaffolded. This lesson marks a transition, so instead of the Summary Writing graphic organizer, students are asked to consider the same things but without the graphic support. Keep in mind that students who struggle may still benefit from using the organizer. On the mid-unit assessment, students will not be presented with any scaffolding for summary writing. Consider, however, continuing to provide the graphic organizer for students who may need extra support. Refer to Lesson 4.
  • In advance: To make it easier to form groups for the World Cafe, consider putting sticky notes under students' chairs with numbers on them. When it is time to form the groups, ask students to find the sticky note under their chair and sit with others who have the same number to form their first group.
  • Review: World Cafe protocol.

Vocabulary

racket, out of kilter, bear the lash, obliged to you

Materials

  • "Ain't I a Woman?" by Sojourner Truth (one copy per student)
  • "Ain't I a Woman?" Note-catcher (one per student)
  • "Ain't I a Woman?" Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Vocabulary in "Equal Rights for Women" (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit with their New York City Discussion Appointment partner and share their vocabulary homework. If students have the same words on their lists, ask them to verify each other's definitions.
  • Collect the homework.
  • Discussion Appointments are a way for students to work with different classmates, leading to mixed-ability groupings. Mixed-ability groupings of students for regular discussion and close reading exercises will provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts and close reading of the text.

B. Review Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets and point out that they should look very familiar. Remind students that they have worked on the same skills with Shirley Chisholm's speech. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introduce "Ain't I a Woman?" (7 minutes)

  • Explain that students are going to analyze another speech, "Ain't I a Woman?" by Sojourner Truth, in order to practice the skills they worked on in the past four lessons.
  • Distribute "Ain't I a Woman?" Point out the title of the speech, the author, and the year it was given. Invite students to read along in their heads while you read it aloud.
  • Give the students 5 minutes to work with a partner to write the gist next to each paragraph. 
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.

B. World Cafe (25 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the past few lessons they learned how to do the following:

*  Find the central idea and supporting details in a text

*  Analyze paragraph structure

*  Analyze author's perspective

  • Tell students that to analyze the "Ain't I a Woman" text, they will focus on the same skills--this time in a "World Cafe."
  • Explain that they will work in small groups to think about and discuss different questions. There will be three rounds; after each round, the groups switch according to the protocol.
  • Explain the protocol:
  1. Students are in groups of four.
  2. Each group selects a leader. The leader's job is to facilitate the discussion and keep their group focused.
  3. The teacher says the focus question for this round.
  4. Students take 2 minutes of silence to independently review the text, think about the question, and take notes in their Note-catcher.
  5. The group discusses the question for Round 1 and adds to their notes for 4 minutes.
  6. The leader stays put; the rest of the group rotates to the next table.
  7. The leader shares the major points of his/her group's discussion with the new group members.
  8. Each table selects a new leader.
  9. Repeat the process until students have had the chance to discuss each question.
  • Arrange students in groups of four. Distribute the "Ain't I a Woman" Note-catcher. Tell students to ignore the bottom right-hand box for now; they will come back to this in the closing of the lesson.
  • Ask students to point to Round 1 on the Note-catcher. Read the question aloud:
  • * "Round 1: Finding the central idea and supporting details: According to Truth, what is the 'fix' that white men are in? What details does Truth use to support that idea?"

  • Invite students to get started by taking 2 minutes to reread the speech and take notes on the question for Round 1.
  • From here, facilitate according to the protocol. Be sure to read each question aloud before students begin a new round.
  • Circulate and check for understanding as groups meet and discuss each question. Provide support to all groups as necessary. See "Ain't I a Woman?" Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference) for sample notes.
  • After all three rounds, refocus students whole group. Debrief the World Cafe protocol by referring to the lesson's learning targets. Suggested student responses to each learning target are found in the "Ain't I a Woman?" Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference).
  • Reread the first posted learning target:
  • *   "I can analyze the development of a central idea in 'Ain't I a Woman?'"

  • Cold call on one or two students to share about the central idea in Truth's speech. Again refer to the "Ain't I a Woman?" Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference).
  • Repeat with the second learning target:
  • *   "I can analyze the structure of a paragraph, including the role of particular sentences, in 'Ain't I a Woman?'"

  • Cold call on one or two students to share what objection to women having rights Truth addressed and how each sentence in the paragraph contributes to Truth's response.
  • Repeat with the third learning target:
  • *   "I can analyze Sojourner Truth's perspective in 'Ain't I a Woman?'"

  • Cold call on one or two students to share what Truth's perspective is and what other viewpoints she acknowledged.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Preparing for Summary Writing (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to point to the box on their Note-catcher labeled Summary Preparation. When students have found it, point out that it has the same elements as the Summary Writing graphic organizer that they used in Lesson 4, but it looks different. Let them know that because they have lots of experience writing summaries, the expectation now is that they can do it more independently.
  • Support students as they begin to think about preparing their summary. Ask: "Based on what we have read so far, what might be the controlling idea for the summary?" Probe by encouraging students to think about the larger theme they have been studying of taking a stand.
  • Ask students to get started with the Summary Preparation box.
  • Explain that for homework they will need to finish the summary preparation and write a summary paragraph of the speech. Remind students to take their copies of the speech home with them.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish summary preparation and write a summary paragraph of "Ain't I a Woman?" 

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