Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L5

Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in informational text. (RI.8.6)
  • I can analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (RI.8.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze Shirley Chisholm's perspective in "Equal Rights for Women."
  • I can analyze how Shirley Chisholm acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 5 Close Reading

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader: Share Homework Summaries (3 minutes)

 B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Chalk Talk: Questioning Texts, Perspective (18 minutes)

 B. Close Reading: Analyzing Conflicting Viewpoints (17 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessments

 A. Revisit Learning Targets and Reflect on Close Reading (5 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Take your copy of "Equal Rights for Women" home with you and complete the vocabulary task.

  • In this lesson, students work with their Buffalo Discussion Appointment partner.
  • In advance: Prepare chart paper for the Chalk Talk. On each paper, write one of the following questions and post around the classroom:

*   What is Shirley Chisholm thinking and saying about discrimination against women?

*   Who is the intended audience of the speech?

*   What is Shirley Chisholm's personal role in discrimination against women?

  • If you have a big class, consider posting two of each question around the classroom so students can easily see the paper.
  • Review: Chalk Talk protocol (Appendix 1).

Vocabulary

perspective, conflicting viewpoints; demeaning, "old darkey," immorality, tokenism, oppression, evolutionary, unconscious, menial, sweeping, supremacist

Materials

  • Chart paper for Chalk Talk with questions prepared (new; teacher-created; see upporting material "Equal Rights for Women" Lesson 5 Close Reading Note-catcher for the Chalk Talk questions)
  • Markers (one per student)
  • "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 5 Close Reading Note-catcher (one per student)
  • "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 5 Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference)
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions document (from Lesson 2)
  • Lesson 5 homework: Vocabulary in "Equal Rights for Women" (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Share Homework Summaries (3 minutes)

  • As students enter the classroom, ask them to meet with their Buffalo Discussion Appointment and share their summaries from their homework.

B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Read the first learning target aloud:

*   "I can analyze Shirley Chisholm's perspective in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

  • Invite students to talk to their partner about what perspective means. After a minute, refocus the class and cold call on one pair. Listen for them to say: "Perspective means point of view." Clarify if necessary, ensuring that students understand that perspective and point of view mean the same thing.
  • Read the second learning target aloud:

*   "I can analyze how Shirley Chisholm acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints."

  • Ask students to turn to their partner and compare the two learning targets: What do they have in common? Cold call on one or two pairs. Listen for: "Both learning targets are about viewpoints." Clarify if necessary.
  • Explain that today, the class will be rereading "Equal Rights for Women" and analyzing the different perspectives in it.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Chalk Talk: Questioning Texts, Perspective (18 minutes)

-   Be sure the chart paper with Chalk Talk questions are posted around the room.

-   Distribute the "Equal Rights for Women" Lesson 5 Close Reading Note-catcher to students.

  • Use the "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 5 Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference in supporting materials) to guide students through a Chalk Talk on text-dependent questions related to "Equal Rights for Women."
  • Chalk Talk provides a whole group space for all students to share their thoughts, ask questions, and respond. It supports students who need more time to process information as well as students who are less likely to participate in whole group discussions.

B. Close Reading: Analyzing Conflicting Viewpoints (17 minutes)

  • Continue to use the "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 5 Close Reading Guide to guide students through the analysis of perspective in the text.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Revisit Learning Targets and Reflect on Close Reading (5 minutes)

  • Reread the learning targets aloud or ask several student volunteers to do so:

*   "I can analyze Shirley Chisholm's perspective in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

*   "I can analyze how Shirley Chisholm acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints."

  • Give students specific positive praise for strong thinking you noticed as they worked with the Shirley Chisholm speech (in this lesson as well as based on your observational data from previous lessons).
  • Tell them that now they have a chance to reflect on what they have done over the past four lessons.
  • Invite students to pull out their Reading Closely: Guiding Questions document (or distribute a fresh handout). Remind them that they worked with this resource during Module 1 as well.
  • Invite students to read over it and ask them to place a star next to questions they have worked on in the past four lessons with Chisholm's speech. Model briefly if needed.
  • Watch for students to place stars by the following:

*   Who is the author?

*   What is the title?

*   What type of text is it?

*   Why has the author structured the sentences and paragraphs this way?

*   What key words or phrases do I notice as I read?

*   What words or phrases are critical for my understanding of the text?

*   What is the author thinking and saying about the topic or theme?

*   Who is the intended audience of the text?

*   What is the author's personal role in the topic or themes?

  • Emphasize that this resource is something they can continue using throughout the year as a form of coaching for themselves on the many questions close readers ask themselves as they work with complex text. 
  • Probe with students about which of these questions felt particularly helpful as they dug into analyzing Chisholm's speech, and why.

Homework

Homework
  • Take your copy of "Equal Rights for Women" home with you and complete vocabulary in "Equal Rights for Women."

 Note: In Lesson 6, students will engage in a World Cafe protocol (see Appendix 1). Please review this protocol in advance to visualize necessary preparation. 

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