Central Idea and Supporting Details: “Equal Rights for Women” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L4

Central Idea and Supporting Details: “Equal Rights for Women”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the development of a theme or central idea throughout the text (including its relationship to supporting ideas). (RI.8.2)
  • I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text
  • (assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims). (RI.8.8) 

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in "Equal Rights for Women."
  • I can evaluate evidence that supports a claim in "Equal Rights for Women."
  • I can objectively summarize "Equal Rights for Women."`

Ongoing Assessment

  • Highlighting in student copies of "Equal Rights for Women"`

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader: Vocabulary in "Equal Rights for Women" (8 minutes)

 B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Jigsaw, Part 1: Evaluating Evidence-based Claims (15 minutes)

 B. Jigsaw, Part 2: Sharing Analysis of Evidence-based Claims (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Summarizing "Equal Rights for Women" (10 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Using the Summary Writing graphic organizer, write a summary paragraph of the speech. 

  • In this lesson, students engage in a jigsaw on the evidence-based claims in Chisholm's speech.
  • The Summary Writing graphic organizer included in the supporting materials of this lesson was first introduced in Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 5.
  • In advance: Prepare index cards for Jigsaw, Part 1. Write one of the following three claims on each index card and make sure you have an equal number of index cards with each claim. Create one index card per pair of students. (For instance, if you have 24 students in your class, you need four index cards of each claim, for a total of 12 index cards. Claims are listed as A, B and C to make regrouping for the Jigsaw easier).
  • Claim A: Discrimination against women is grounded in an unspoken belief that women are inferior.
  • Claim B: Women who do not conform to the current system face social discrimination.
  • Claim C: Women are becoming more aware of the discrimination they face in the workplace and in society.
  • Review: Quiz-Quiz-Trade and Jigsaw protocols (Appendix 1).

Vocabulary

evaluate; demeaning, "old darkey," immorality, tokenism, oppression, evolutionary, unconscious, menial, sweeping, supremacist

Materials

  • "Equal Rights for Women"(from Lesson 2; students' own copies)
  • Blank strips of paper (for Quiz-Quiz-Trade)
  • Dictionaries
  • "Equal Rights for Women" (one copy for teacher, with sections marked)
  • Index cards with one of the three claims from Chisholm's speech (one index card per pair of students; teacher-generated; see Teaching Note)
  • Highlighters (one per student)
  • Evaluating Evidence Note-catcher (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Vocabulary in "Equal Rights for Women" (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to get out their "Equal Rights for Women" text. While students are doing this, pass out blank strips of paper and dictionaries.
  • Remind students that in Lesson 2, they circled words in the speech that they did not know. Ask students to find a word that they circled in the speech and that they think is important. Have them write it on one side of their strip of paper.
  • On the other side of their strip of paper, ask students to write what they think the word means. Then they should check it with a dictionary and revise the definition if they need to.
  • Let students know that they will be doing a protocol called Quiz-Quiz-Trade." Give directions:

i. You will find a partner and show that person the vocabulary word on your strip of paper.

ii. Your partner will try to infer the meaning of the word.

iii. Then the process repeats for the other partner.

iv. After each person has tried to infer the meaning of the words, find out the correct definitions, then trade papers and find new partners.

  • Clarify directions if needed and invite students to begin. As they work, circulate to listen in to gauge how well they are understanding the words and to continue to coach them on the protocol.
  • Once students have partnered up twice, they return to their seats.

B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Cold call on a student to read the learning targets aloud:

*   "I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

*   "I can evaluate evidence that supports a claim in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

*   "I can objectively summarize 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

  • Ask students to locate the word evaluate and try to figure out what it means in that learning target. When they think they know, ask them to give you a thumbs-up.
  • Once students have their thumbs up, cold call on one or two students to define evaluate. Listen for students to say: "It means to judge" or "It means to figure out what evidence is strong." If needed, clarify for students.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Jigsaw, Part 1: Evaluating Evidence-based Claims (15 minutes)

  • Share with students that Chisholm makes several claims or points in her speech as she takes a stand for equality for women.
  • Model analyzing Chisholm's claim that women want equal rights, not special privileges. Tell students that in order to prove this, Chisholm uses evidence to support her claim.
  • Highlight "Existing laws are not adequate to secure equal rights for women. Sufficient proof of this is the concentration of women in lower paying, menial, unrewarding jobs, and their incredible scarcity in the upper level jobs." (Paragraph 13) and explain that this helps support Chisholm's idea that women don't already have equal rights.
  • Highlight "Women need no protection that men do not need. What we need are laws to protect working people, to guarantee them fair pay, safe working conditions, protection against sickness and layoffs, and provision for dignified, comfortable retirement." (Paragraph 16) and explain that this supports the idea that women don't need special privileges.
  • Ask students to meet with their Buffalo Discussion Appointment partner. Distribute one index card per student pair and one highlighter per student.
  • Invite student pairs to reread the text and highlight the evidence they find in the text that supports the claim on their index card. Be sure students know that later in the lesson, they will be accountable for sharing what they learn with peers who worked on other claims.
  • As pairs are working, circulate and check students' understanding. Make sure students can explain how the evidence they highlight supports the claim on their index card. Highlighted evidence should include:

*     Claim A: Discrimination against women is grounded in an unspoken belief that women are inferior.

  1. Evidence: "demeaning experience." (Paragraph 2)
  2. Evidence: "There is a calculated system of prejudice that lies unspoken behind that question." (Paragraph 3)

Evidence: "The unspoken assumption is that women are different." (Paragraph 4)
*          Claim B: Women who do not conform to the current system face social discrimination.

  1. Evidence: "The unspoken assumption is that women are different. They do not have executive ability, orderly minds, stability, leadership skills, and they are too emotional." (Paragraph 4)
  2. Evidence: "And women that do not conform to the system, who try to break with the accepted patterns, are stigmatized as odd and unfeminine." (Paragraph 14)
  3. Evidence: "The fact is that a woman who aspires to be chairman of the board, or a Member of the House, does so for exactly the same reasons as any man." (Paragraph 14)

*          Claim C: Women are becoming more aware of the discrimination they face in the workplace and in society.

  1. Evidence: "Why is it acceptable for women to be secretaries, librarians, and teachers, but totally unacceptable for them to be managers, administrators, doctors, lawyers, and Members of Congress." (Paragraph 3)
  2. Evidence: "But now there is an awareness of this situation particularly among the younger segment of the population." (Paragraph 10)
  3. Evidence: It is obvious that discrimination exists. Women do not have the opportunities that men do." (Paragraph 14)
  • If students have trouble getting the gist, point out important sentences in each section to help guide them:
  • Section B: "Prejudice against blacks is becoming unacceptable although it will take years to eliminate it. But it is doomed because, slowly, white America is beginning to admit
    that it exists. Prejudice against women is still acceptable." (Paragraph 7)
  • Section C: "More than half of the population of the United States is female. But women occupy only 2 percent of the managerial positions." (Paragraph 8)
  • Section D: "But now there is an awareness of this situation particularly among the younger segment of the population." (Paragraph 10 ) AND "But they can be used to provide protection for those who are most abused, and to begin the process of evolutionary change by compelling the insensitive majority to reexamine its unconscious attitudes."  (Paragraph 11)

NOTE: For these sentences, students may need guidance to identify antecedents of "this situation" and "they."

  • Section E: "Existing laws are not adequate to secure equal rights for women." (Paragraph 13)
  • Section F: "Women need no protection that men do not need. What we need are laws to protect working people, to guarantee them fair pay, safe working conditions, protection against sickness and layoffs, and provision for dignified, comfortable retirement." (Paragraph 16)

B. Jigsaw, Part 2: Sharing Analysis of Evidence-based Claims (10 minutes)

  • After about 15 minutes, refocus the class. Let students know that in a moment, they will transition to work with students who focused on different claims and discuss three claims that Chisholm makes in her speech.
  • Help students prepare for their sharing. Invite them to open their notebooks and set up a Note-catcher. Display the Evaluating Evidence Note-catcher using the document camera.
  • Let students know that in their groups, they will share the claim they focused on. When they are not sharing their claim, their job as a member of their group is to discuss their groupmates' ideas and make sure to understand them before writing anything in their Note-catchers.
  • Then form new triads, so each triad has one student who focused on each claim (A/B/C). (It is fine to have groups of four if needed.)
  • Invite students to begin sharing in their new triads. As students are discussing, circulate and listen in for them to identify relevant evidence and justify their evaluation well. 
  • For students who need more support, consider pairing them together and giving them the claim "Discrimination against women is grounded in an unspoken belief that women are inferior," since the primary evidence for the claim can be found by rereading the first four paragraphs instead of the entire speech.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Summarizing "Equal Rights for Women" (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Summary Writing graphic organizer. Remind students that they've used it in Module 1 to summarize "Refugees: Who, Where, Why." Review the steps to complete the graphic organizer and write a summary.
  • Let students know that their homework will be to complete the Summary Writing graphic organizer and write a summary of Chisholm's speech. Invite students to start the graphic organizer with the time left in class.

Homework

Homework
  • Complete the Summary Writing graphic organizer and write a summary paragraph of Shirley Chisholm's speech, "Equal Rights for Women."

 

Note: In the next lesson, students will revisit the Close Reading document, which was first introduced in Module 1, Unit 2. Be sure students have their copies, or prepare new ones. 

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