Analyzing Text Structure and Summarizing Text: “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L3

Analyzing Text Structure and Summarizing Text: “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in a text (including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept). (RI.8.5)
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.8.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in "Equal Rights for Women," including the role of a particular sentence in developing a key concept.
  • I can analyze the development of a central idea in "Equal Rights for Women."
  • I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in "Equal Rights for Women."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotated text "Equal Rights for Women"

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Introducing Discussion Appointments (8 minutes)

 B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Guided Practice: Analyzing Paragraph Structure (15 minutes)

 B. Annotating the Text of "Equal Rights for Women" by Shirley Chisholm (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Based on Chisholm's speech, add to your Taking a Stand: Frayer Model handout.

  • Students set up "Discussion Appointments" with five peers; these appointments will be used for peer conversation throughout this module. This new routine builds on students' work in their "numbered heads" group in Module 1, gradually encouraging students to work with more and more of their classmates. These discussion structures support students' mastery of SL.8.1.
  • Students continue to work with Shirley Chisholm's speech "Equal Rights for Women." Having thought about the gist of the whole speech in Lesson 3, they now reread and annotate each section of the text for the gist.
  • Be sure the text is chunked into sections (see Lesson 2 teaching note).
  • In this lesson, students work together to analyze a paragraph structure before they annotate the sections of the speech for the gist. This sequence of activities is intentional. The skill of analyzing paragraph structure gives students one more tool to use when determining the gist of each section.
  • Review: Fist to Five Protocol (see Appendix 1).

Vocabulary

evaluate, objectively summarize; demeaning, "old darkey," immorality, tokenism, oppression, evolutionary, unconscious, menial, sweeping, supremacist 

Materials

  • Instructions for Discussion Appointments (for Teacher Reference)
  • Discussion Appointments handout (one per student)
  • "Equal Rights for Women" (from Lesson 2; students' own copies and one to display)
  • "Equal Rights for Women": Analyzing Text Structure Note-catcher (one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Document camera
  • "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 3 Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing Discussion Appointments (8 minutes)

  • Tell students you are going to explain the new protocol for meeting with peers during Module 2. Distribute the Discussion Appointments handout. Tell students that this will be a way for them to have partner discussions with several of their classmates. Being able to talk to a lot of classmates will give them more ideas for discussing and writing about the texts during this module. Reinforce that discussion is one strong way to deepen their understanding of a text.
  • Give the following directions for making Discussion Appointments:

i. You will sign up for five appointments with five different partners.

ii. For each location on the map, you may have only one appointment.

iii. If someone asks you for an appointment and that location is available, you need to accept the appointment.

iv. In the blank next to each location, write the name of your appointment partner.

v. Once you have made all five appointments, return to your seat.

  • Give students 3 minutes to make their Discussion Appointments. Consider setting a timer to help them stay focused and do this task quickly. Circulate to support or clarify as needed.
  • About halfway through this sign-up process, check with the students to see who needs appointments in various locations. You can do this by asking, for example: "Raise your hand if you need an appointment in Rochester." As students raise their hands, match them up.
  • Once they have their sheets filled out, ask students to return to their seats. Tell them that they will work with these Discussion Appointment partners regularly.
  • Remind them that if their partner is absent on a given day or they do not have a partner for a particular location, they should report to you at the front of the room and you will tell them with whom to meet.
  • Discussion Appointments are a way for students to work with different classmates, leading to mixed-ability groupings. Mixed-ability groupings of students for regular discussion and close reading exercises will provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts and close reading of the text.

B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to look at the learning targets while you read them aloud.

* "I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in 'Equal Rights for Women,' including the role of a particular sentence in developing a key concept."

* "I can analyze the development of a central idea in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

* "I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

  • Remind students that they began to analyze Shirley Chisholm's speech in the previous lesson. Today they will continue to read it closely, this time focusing on paragraph structure.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Guided Practice: Analyzing Paragraph Structure (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their copies of "Equal Rights for Women." Let students know that now they will analyze the structure of a paragraph and the purpose of particular sentences in Chisholm's speech.
  • Distribute the "Equal Rights for Women": Analyzing Text Structure Note-catcher and display it on the document camera.
  • Point out that the Note-catcher will lead them through an analysis of the structure of Paragraph 10 in "Equal Rights for Women." Ask students to work together on this with their Albany Discussion Appointment partner.
  • Refer to the "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 3 Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference) for guidance on how to support students in this portion of the lesson.
  • As students are working, circulate to ensure that students understand the analysis of the paragraph structure.
  • Once students are done, refocus the class. Cold call on groups to share their analyses of paragraph structure. Invite students to refine their Note-catchers based on the class discussion.
  • Analyzing text structure supports students who struggle with reading and writing, particularly English language learners, because it gives students an explicit way to see how sentences build on one another to make meaning.
  • Talking as a whole class after a small group activity gives the teacher as well as students a chance to check understanding and correct any misconceptions.

B. Annotating the Text of "Equal Rights for Women" by Shirley Chisholm (15 minutes)

  • Now that students have analyzed the structure of a paragraph, they will turn their attention to understanding the speech as a whole. Share with students that as the first step to understand how Chisholm is taking a stand, they will annotate the speech for the gist.
  • Invite students to look at their copies of "Equal Rights for Women." Point out that their copy of the speech has sections marked on it, from A to F.
  • Display "Equal Rights for Women" on the document camera.
  • Model annotating a section for the gist. Read Section A aloud and notice that the idea of this section seems to be about women being discriminated against when they are looking for jobs. In the margin, annotate this section, writing something like: "Women are not able to get any job they want because people assume that women are different from men and so cannot hold the same jobs."
  • Ask students to reread the rest of the speech with a partner and annotate Sections B-F for the gist as well as circle words that they don't understand.
  • As students are working, circulate around the room. Make sure they understand the gist of each section:

* Section B: Both women and African Americans have been discriminated against, but it's getting better for African Americans and not for women.

* Section C: Although women make up more than half the population, they have very few leadership jobs.

* Section D: Awareness of discrimination against women is rising, and a law to protect women would help change attitudes.

* Section E: The Equal Rights Amendment is important because current laws aren't working to protect women.

* Section F: Women don't need special protection; they need equality. 

  • Text-dependent questions can be answered only by referring explicitly to the text being read. This encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and allows for a deeper understanding.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets one a time for the class. Ask students to rate themselves using Fist to Five on how confident they are that they have mastered each learning target.

*   "I can analyze the structure of a specific paragraph in 'Equal Rights for Women,' including the role of a particular sentence in developing a key concept."

*   "I can analyze the development of a central idea in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

*   "I can identify specific claims that Shirley Chisholm makes in 'Equal Rights for Women.'"

Homework

Homework
  • Based on Chisholm's speech, add to your Taking a Stand: Frayer Model handout.

Note: If many students rated themselves three or less on any of the learning targets, consider reviewing that skill in subsequent lessons. 

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