Taking a Stand: “Equal Rights for Women” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L2

Taking a Stand: “Equal Rights for Women”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite the evidence that Shirley Chisholm uses to support her claims in "Equal Rights for Women."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Student Note-catcher with text-dependent questions

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader (3 minutes)

B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading for the Gist: "Equal Rights for Women" by Shirley Chisholm (10 minutes)

B. Text-Dependent Questions (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview

4. Homework (5 minutes)

A. Why is Shirley Chisholm taking a stand for women's rights rather than African American rights?

  • The writing in Module 2A, Unit 1 will build on the skills students developed in Module 1, including QuickWrites (see in particular Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3) and summary writing (see in particular Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 5).
  • "Equal Rights for Women" is the focus of Lessons 2-5. Be sure students hold onto their copy of the speech throughout these lessons.
  • Lessons 2-5 are based heavily on the Making Evidence-Based Claims units developed by Odell Education. For the original Odell Education units, go to www.odelleducation.com/resources.
  • For Lesson 2, the text needs to be broken into sections. Before giving the students their text, mark the sections as follows:
    • Section A: Paragraphs 1-4
    • Section B: Paragraphs 5-7
    • Section C: Paragraphs 8-9
    • Section D: Paragraphs 10-11
    • Section E: Paragraphs 12-14
    • Section F: Paragraphs 15-17
  • Beginning with Module 2, lessons that involve close reading will include a new type of supporting material, a Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference). See supporting materials. Use this guide to support you in facilitating work time in this lesson.
  • Students refer to the Odell Education resource Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (provided here in supporting materials and also available as a stand-alone document on EngageNY.org and odelleducation.com/resources). (This document was first introduced in Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 1). 
  • In this module, beginning with Shirley Chisholm's speech and continuing with To Kill a Mockingbird, students will encounter racially charged words and phrases. It is important to stop for a moment to address this language. Be sure to explain that people used to use language like "old darkey," but that it isn't acceptable to use that language anymore because it is from a time when African Americans were not afforded equal rights or protection in the United States. If students react emotionally to this language, consider giving them space to process their feelings, whether it is in writing, in an open class discussion, or in private with you.
  • In advance: Read Shirley Chisholm's "Equal Rights for Women."
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

taking a stand, advantages, disadvantages; characteristics

Materials

  • "Equal Rights for Women" by Shirley Chisholm (one per student)
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 2 Text-Dependent Questions (one per student)
  • "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 2 Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to partner up with someone nearby and share the Advantages/Disadvantages t-chart they completed for homework.  Provide about two minutes for this, then share with them that in the future they will think more about the advantages and disadvantages of using photographs and other media types.

B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read aloud the first learning target: "I can cite the evidence that Shirley Chisholm uses to support her claims in 'Equal Rights for Women.'" Ask students: "What does it mean to cite evidence?" Cold call on a student. Ideally students will understand that to cite means to name or mention details from the text.
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for the Gist: "Equal Rights for Women" by Shirley Chisholm (10 minutes)

  • Pass out "Equal Rights for Women" by Shirley Chisholm. Tell students that they are going to read a speech where someone is taking a stand. Ask students to notice the title, author's name, and date. Invite students to turn and talk to a partner to make a prediction about what the author will take a stand about. Ideally students will identify the title as taking a stand on ways to treat women equally.
  • Share with students that they will be spending some time with this new text over the next five lessons.
  • Display the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout using the document camera and ask students to think to themselves about which questions they should ask when getting a text for the first time. Ask them to turn and talk to their seat partner:
  • "What questions do you think are important to ask? Why?"

-   Cold call on a pair to share. Listen for students to point out the questions in the Approaching Texts row of the document, including:

*  Who is the author?

*  What is the title?

*  What type of text is it?

*  Who published the text?

*  When was the text published?

  • Tell students that they will be reading closely to understand the author's view and how the author crafts the structure of the text to prove the claim.
  • Ask students to read along silently and circle words they are unfamiliar with as you read the speech aloud.
  • Invite them to turn to a partner and talk about the gist of the speech.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them to monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.

B. Text-Dependent Questions (25 minutes)

  • Display and distribute "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 2 Text-Dependent Questions.
  • Use the teacher resource "Equal Rights for Women": Lesson 2 Close Reading Guide for guidance on how to help students work through the series of text-dependent questions. 
  • Text-dependent questions can be answered only by referring explicitly to the text being read. This encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and allows for a deeper understanding.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to reflect on the first learning target. Cold call one or two students to cite an important piece of evidence they uncovered from the speech about women and equal rights.
  • Preview the homework.

Homework

Homework
  • QuickWrite: Why is Shirley Chisholm taking a stand for women's rights rather than African American rights? Use specific evidence from the text to write a paragraph that answers this question.

*   Answer the prompt completely

*   Provide relevant and complete evidence

*   Paragraph includes the following:

*   A focus statement

*   At least three pieces of evidence from the text

*   For each piece of evidence, an analysis or explanation: What does this evidence mean?

*   A concluding sentence

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