Jigsaw to Analyze Mood and Tone in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapter 8) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L16

Jigsaw to Analyze Mood and Tone in To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapter 8)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can analyze the connections between modern fiction and myths, traditional stories, or religious works (themes, patterns of events, character types). (RL.8.9)
  • I can analyze how specific dialogue or incidents in a plot propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (RL.8.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how the structure of "Incident" helps create meaning.
  • I can infer how Scout's perspective about Boo Radley changes from Chapter 1 to Chapter 8 based on events in these chapters.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Analyzing Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley Note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Reading "Incident" (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Analyzing Text Structure in "Incident" (15 minutes)

 B. Close Reading Jigsaw: Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley (22 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Debriefing Learning Targets and Previewing Homework (3 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Complete a first read of Chapter 9. Take notes using the Structured Notes graphic organizer.

  • The beginning of this lesson builds in more practice for students to analyze the meaning and structure of a poem, a skill introduced in Lesson 15. However, in this lesson, the analysis does not go as in-depth with questions pertaining to word choice or perspective, since this text is more accessible. Remind students that even though they are focused on structure, they need to keep in mind those other elements of poetry in order to understand the meaning. In Lesson 17, students will come back to this poem and compare it to the novel.
  • Note that the poem "Incident" directly refers to a moment when the Golden Rule is not followed, and it involves a racial slur. Be sure to read the poem in advance and be prepared to handle this offensive slur sensitively with students.
  • During Work Time, the reading focus in this lesson is first for students to analyze a quote that shows Scout's perspective about Boo Radley. These quotes are pulled from several chapters, not just Chapter 8. The purpose is for students to participate in a jigsaw in order to understand how Scout's perspective about Boo Radley changes over the course of the book. The focus on Boo is built into this lesson because the incident when Boo puts the blanket on Scout's shoulders is a turning point in the way Scout thinks of Boo.
  • In advance: Decide which Discussion Appointment to use today.
  • Review: Jigsaw protocol (see Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

infer, render, commotion (72), malignant (74), pilgrimage (76), burdensome (81), rendered (82), unfathomable, aberration (85), procured (89), caricature (90), quelled (94)

Materials

  • "Incident" by Countee Cullen (one per student)
  • "Incident" Structure Note-catcher (one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • "Incident" Structure Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference)
  • Document camera
  • Analyzing Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley Note-catcher (one per student)
  • Analyzing Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference)
  • Jigsaw excerpts (one per pair of students)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird (book; one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes, Chapter 9 (one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 9 (optional for students needing more support.

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Reading "Incident" (5 minutes)

  • Distribute "Incident" and ask students to read it silently twice and jot the gist of each stanza.
  • Cold call a student to read the learning targets.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Text Structure in "Incident" (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit with their selected Discussion Appointment partner and distribute the "Incident" Structure Note-catcher. Remind students that they analyzed the text structure of "Those Winter Sundays" in the previous lesson. They will be doing something similar in this lesson with "Incident" by Countee Cullen. This poem was published in 1925.
  • Ask students to begin by each reading the poem aloud quietly, so only their partner can hear them. Once they have done that, they may begin to work through the "Incident" Note-catcher.
  • After 10 minutes, cold call pairs to share their thinking. Show a blank "Incident" Note-catcher using a document camera and fill it in as students share answers. Encourage students to support their answers with the text and revise their work as the class understanding develops.
  • Let students know that they will come back to this Note-catcher tomorrow, when they will compare the structure of "Incident" with the structure of Chapter 8 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Rereading and reading out loud are important strategies for students to access and comprehend poetry.

B. Close Reading Jigsaw: Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley (22 minutes)

  • Let students know that, working toward the second learning target, they will continue working with their Discussion Appointment partner to understand how quotes based on events in the novel shows Scout's perspective about Boo Radley.
  • Pass out the Analyzing Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley Note-catcher and Jigsaw excerpts. Ask students to point to the row on their Note-catcher that matches the excerpt they have. Tell them that they will first work with their partner to infer Scout's perspective about Boo Radley as expressed in the excerpt and fill out their Note-catcher accordingly. Tell students that they must check the context of the quote in their copies of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • As they work, circulate and make sure that students' inferences are logical given the quote they have (see Analyzing Scout's Perspective about Boo Radley Note-catcher (Answers for Teacher Reference)).
  • After about 5 minutes, assemble students into groups of four with each excerpt represented. Instruct them to share their inferences in order: Chapter 1 first, then Chapter 4, then Chapters 6 and 7, and finally Chapter 8. Emphasize that all students are responsible for taking notes on their Note-catcher as their group mates share.
  • Circulate as groups work, again checking to make sure students' inferences make sense given the excerpts. Clarify any confusion.
  • After 10 minutes, refocus the groups whole class. Cold call students to share their inferences (again in order from Chapter 1 to Chapter 8). 
  • Rereading and reading out loud are important strategies for students to access and comprehend poetry.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Debriefing Learning Targets and Previewing Homework (3 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets again. Cold call a student to explain what it means that the Golden Rule is rendered new. Let students know that they will continue to work on these skills as they continue reading To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Distribute the To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapter 9. Preview the homework. Read the focus question out loud. Ask students if they have any questions about what significance means. Clarify as necessary. Remind students that significance means "importance."
  • Distribute the Homework: To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes, Chapter 9 or Homework: To Kill a Mockingbird Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 9 and briefly preview the homework.
  • Checking in with learning targets helps students self-assess their learning. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners most.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Complete a first read of Chapter 9, using structured notes. Answer the focus question: Atticus says, "Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win" (101). What does he mean? Explain the significance of this statement. Use the strongest evidence from the novel in your answer.

Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the novel.

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