Comparing Text Structures: To Kill a Mockingbird and “Those Winter Sundays” (Chapters 6 and 7) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L15

Comparing Text Structures: To Kill a Mockingbird and “Those Winter Sundays” (Chapters 6 and 7)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can objectively summarize literary text. (RL.8.2)
  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can compare and contrast the structure of multiple texts. (RL.8.5)
  • I can analyze how different structures impact meaning and style of a text. (RL.8.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can compare and contrast the structure of Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird and "Those Winter Sundays."
  • I can analyze how the structures of Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird and "Those Winter Sundays" affect meaning. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Close Reading "Those Winter Sundays" Note-catcher
  • Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Narrative Structure Chapter 6 (8 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read of "Those Winter Sundays" (25 minutes)

 B. Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (2 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Complete a first read of Chapter 8. Take notes using the Structured Notes graphic organizer. 

  • In the Opening, students focus on Chapter 6, even though they read both Chapters 6 and 7 for homework. This is intentional, since Chapter 6 is more integral to the work of the module, and since during Work Time, students will compare Chapter 6 with the poem "Those Winter Sundays" by Robert Hayden.
  • Poem text structure analysis is introduced in this lesson. Because it requires new and complex skills, the teacher guides this lesson heavily. In the next two lessons, students will practice these skills more independently.
  • In advance: Read "Those Winter Sundays" several times to become familiar with both the meaning and the structure. Decide which Discussion Appointment to use today.

Vocabulary

commotion (72) malignant (74), pilgrimage (76), burdensome (81), rendered (82)

Materials

  • To Kill a Mockingbird (book; one per student)
  • Narrative Structure Chapter 6 graphic organizer (one per student)
  • "Those Winter Sundays" by Robert Hayden (one per student)
  • Close Reading "Those Winter Sundays" Note-catcher (one per student and one for teacher modeling)
  • Document camera
  • Close Reading "Those Winter Sundays" Note-catcher (for Teacher Reference)
  • Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher (one per student and one for modeling)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes Graphic Organizer, Chapter 8 (one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Supported Structured Notes Graphic Organizer, Chapter 8 (optional for students needing more support)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Narrative Structure Chapter 6 (8 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their Structured Notes and copies of To Kill a Mockingbird. Distribute the Narrative Structure graphic organizer, Chapter 6 and ask students to complete it. Remind them that they need to fill it out only for Chapter 6, not Chapter 7. Let them know that they will not write the summary paragraph today; instead, they will use their graphic organizer to talk about the structure of the chapter.
  • When students have finished, read the learning target aloud:

*   "I can compare and contrast the structure of Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird and 'Those Winter Sundays.'"

  • Point out that the learning target is focused on a skill that is new to the students, but it will build on what they have already done on narrative structure in previous lessons.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Reading of "Those Winter Sundays" (25 minutes)

  • Ask students to meet with their selected Discussion Appointment partner. Distribute "Those Winter Sundays" and the Close Reading "Those Winter Sundays" Note-catcher. Invite the class to read along silently while the poem is read aloud.
  • Ask students to turn to their partner and reread the text aloud. Set the expectation that students read very quietly, because everyone else will be reading, too.
  • When they have done that, ask students to read the poem silently and encourage them to think hard as they are reading about what the poet seems to be saying.
  • Ask:

*   "What do you think the gist of this poem might be?" Invite them to share their thoughts with their partner and take notes on their Note-catcher.

  • Cold call a pair to share their answer. Listen for students to say: "The gist is that the narrator didn't understand when he was a child that his father loved him."
  • Using a document camera, display a blank Close Reading Note-catcher and fill it in with correct answers as students give them. Encourage them to revise and correct their own Note-catchers as well.
  • Explain that poets choose words the way composers of music choose notes--each and every one matters. Invite students to look at the vocabulary chart on their Note-catchers. Ask them to find each word and discuss with their partner to figure out what it might mean.
  • Cold call pairs to share their inferences and add correct meanings to the displayed Note-catcher. Clarify the meanings as necessary and ask students to write the actual meaning on the chart.
  • Explain that in addition to choosing words carefully, poets choose structure carefully--how they build the text. This poem has been built in stanzas. It has three stanzas, and these are the basic structure, or building blocks, of the poem. Ask students to draw the images that the author creates in each stanza. Point out that the third stanza has been broken into two parts: the first two lines and the last two lines.
  • When students are done, point to Question 4. Ask them to fill in the chart and think about how the poet uses the stanzas to develop the narrator and the father. 
  • Cold call students to share their inferences and add to the displayed Note-catcher. Clarify and ask students to revise their work as necessary.
  • Invite students to continue to work with their partner on Questions 5 and 6. As they work, circulate and support where needed.
  • When they are done, cold call pairs to share their ideas about Questions 5 and 6. As students share, add to the displayed Note-catcher. Again, encourage students to revise their own Note-catchers if necessary.
  • Cold call a pair to share what they think "Those Winter Sundays" is saying about the Golden Rule. Write that in the Class Consensus box on the displayed Note-catcher. Then, cold call another pair to add to or change it, depending on their ideas. Do this several times until many students have had a voice in creating the class consensus. If students offer something that is illogical or unconnected to the poem, push them to justify their answer using evidence from the text. After about 5 minutes, ask students to give a thumbs-up if they approve of the class consensus. If most students give a thumbs-up, ask them to add the consensus to their own Note-catchers.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. This strategy also supports students' comprehension by allowing them to make initial meaning without working so hard to read the text. Set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Consider allowing students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves. Teachers can address student-selected vocabulary as well as predetermined vocabulary in subsequent encounters with the text.

B. Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher. Point out that this Note-catcher asks students to think about how each text--"Those Winter Sundays" and Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird--uses text structure to help communicate something about the Golden Rule.
  • Display a blank Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher using the document camera. Model how to use this graphic organizer by doing a think-aloud and referring to the Close Reading Note-catcher the class just completed. Invite students to fill out their Note-catchers as you model. Consider following these steps:

*  First, look to the Close Reading Note-catcher for how "Those Winter Sundays" relates to the Golden Rule. Fill that in.

*  Point to the next box and say something like: "We just looked at the text structure of the poem. It has three stanzas with four lines each. The last two lines are the narrator reflecting on his childhood." Add that to the Note-catcher.

*  Lastly, point to the third box and say something like: "The structure helps create the meaning because the first two stanzas show what the narrator's father did to show his love for his son. The last two lines then show that the narrator did not appreciate all the things his father did for him. His father was following the Golden Rule, but the son didn't know until later."

  • Ask students to look at their Narrative Structure Chapter 6 graphic organizer. Remind them that this organizer describes the structure and the meaning created by the end of the chapter, so they can use it to help them answer the questions.
  • Tell students to work with their partner to use their Narrative Structure Chapter 6 graphic organizer to help them fill in the column on To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 6. 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets and Preview Homework (2 minutes)

  • Reread the learning target:

*     I can compare and contrast the structure of Chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird and "Those Winter Sundays."

  • Ask students to use Fist to Five to rate how confident they are that they have mastered that learning target.
  • Distribute the Homework: To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes, Chapter 8 or Homework: To Kill a Mockingbird Supported Structured Notes, Chapter 8 and briefly preview the homework.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Complete a first read of Chapter 8, using structured notes. Answer the focus question: What is an example of the Golden Rule in this chapter? Use the strongest evidence from the novel in your answer.

 

Note: Consider collecting the Comparing and Contrasting Text Structures Note-catcher to review, so that misconceptions can be addressed in the next lesson. 

  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the novel.

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