Inferring about Character: Atticus (Chapter 5) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L14

Inferring about Character: Atticus (Chapter 5)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (RL.8.1)
  • I can determine figurative and connotative meanings of words and phrases as they are used in a text including analogies or allusions to other texts. (RL.8.4).
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.8.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can deepen my understanding of key words in To Kill a Mockingbird by engaging in Quiz-Quiz-Trade.
  • I can support my inferences about Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text.
  • I can determine the figurative meanings of words and phrases as they are used in Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Ongoing Assessment

  • QuickWrite

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

 A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Vocabulary (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

 A. Read-aloud: Miss Maudie's View on Atticus and the Radleys (5 minutes)

 B. Chalk Talk: Text-Dependent Questions about Chapter 5 (23 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

 A. Exit Ticket: "Stop Tormenting the Man" (10 minutes)

 B. Debriefing Learning Targets and Previewing Homework (2 minutes)

4. Homework

 A. Complete a first read of Chapters 6 and 7. Take notes using the Structured Notes graphic organizer. 

  • In this lesson, students do a close read of Chapter 5 to practice analyzing figurative language, as well as making inferences about the text.
  • For the opening, students engage in Quiz-Quiz-Trade. They were introduced to it first in Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 4.
  • In this lesson, students will engage in the Chalk Talk protocol. They were first introduced to this in Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 2. It will be used differently here. Instead of grouping the students, they should walk from chart to chart in order to think about all four questions.
  • In advance: Make copies of the vocabulary strips and cut them out. Prepare for the Chalk Talk. Post the text-dependent questions on chart paper around the room. Consider spreading them out to allow students to easily access them.
  • Review: Quiz-Quiz-Trade protocol,
  • Chalk Talk protocol (see Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

benign, tacit (56) cordiality, benevolence, morbid (57) edification (65) 

Materials

  • To Kill a Mockingbird (book; one per student)
  • Vocabulary strips (teacher-prepared; see Supporting Materials)
  • Vocabulary Handout: Chapter 5 (one per student)
  • Text-dependent questions for Chalk Talk chart (teacher reference; one chart per group with all four questions on it; see Supporting Materials for example)
  • Markers (one per student)
  • Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference)
  • Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird Text-dependent Questions (one per student)
  • QuickWrite: "Stop Tormenting the Man!" (one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapters 6 & 7 (one per student)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapters 6 & 7 (optional for students needing more support)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader and Reviewing Learning Targets: Vocabulary (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to get out their To Kill a Mockingbird Structured Notes graphic organizer, Chapter 5. While they are doing this, distribute Vocabulary Strips and Vocabulary Handout: Chapter 5.
  • Ask students to find their word in their structured notes and write their definition on the back of the strip of paper. Then, they check it using the vocabulary handout and revise the definition if needed.
  • Let students know that they will be doing Quiz-Quiz-Trade. Briefly review the directions:
  • You will find a partner and show him or her the vocabulary word on your strip of paper.
  • Your partner will try to determine the meaning of the word.
  • Then the process repeats for the other partner.
  • After both students have tried to determine the meaning of the words, find out the correct definitions, then trade papers and find new partners.
  • Clarify directions as needed, then invite the class to begin. Circulate to guide students with this vocabulary activity and to listen in on their initial understanding of these words.
  • Once students have partnered up twice, they return to their seats.
  • Read today's learning targets out loud. Point out that students have already met the first learning target. Explain that the rest of the lesson will be focused on mastering the other two learning targets by closely reading a small section of Chapter 5.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Read-aloud: Miss Maudie's View on Atticus and the Radleys (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their text To Kill a Mockingbird, turn to page 57, and read along silently while you read aloud.

   *Read aloud from "In summertime, twilights are long and peaceful" on page 57 to "I liked it very much" on page 61. Remember that this should be a "pure" read-aloud: Read slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.

  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. This strategy also supports students' comprehension by allowing them to make initial meaning without working so hard to read the text. Set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.

B. Chalk Talk: Text-Dependent Questions about Chapter 5 (23 minutes)

  • Distribute the Text-dependent questions for Chalk Talk charts. Tell students that they will participate in a silent discussion (called a Chalk Talk) about the excerpt of the text they have just read.
  • Set expectations and describe the basic process of the Chalk Talk:
  • This technique works only if everyone is writing and responding for the whole 10 minutes. Make it clear that everyone is responsible for writing, reading other people's comments, and responding; there should be no talking, and no one should sit down until the time is up. Opinions must be freely expressed and honored, and no personal attacks are allowed.
  • Each person will each have a marker and book. The teacher poses four questions to the groups (in this case, the questions are written on a piece of chart paper divided into four sections).
  • Students write their thinking and responses to each of the questions on the chart paper.
  • When signaled, they move on to answering the next question to make sure all four questions are answered.
  • As students do this 10-minute Chalk Talk, use the Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference only) for suggestions about specific ways to support them with probing questions.
  • After about 10 minutes, ask students to return to their seats. Distribute the Chapter 5 of To Kill a Mockingbird Text-dependent Questions. Move the chart papers to a place where all students can see them. Ask students to take about 5 minutes to read over the thinking on the chart papers and write down their best answer to each question.
  • Then refocus students whole group. Lead a debrief with the class. Cold call students to share their answers to the questions. Encourage students to add to or revise their notes during the discussion. Probe or scaffold as appropriate with the questions on the Close Reading Guide. Be sure the students come to a correct understanding; clarify any confusion. 
  • Use of protocols (like Chalk Talk) allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: "Stop Tormenting the Man" (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the QuickWrite: "Stop Tormenting the Man!" and ask students to work independently on a QuickWrite to address the prompt:

*     '"I'm going to tell you something and tell you one time: stop tormenting that man' (65). What does this statement show about Atticus's belief in the Golden Rule?"

  • After about 8 minutes, collect the exit tickets and use them to assess whether students understand that Atticus believes in the Golden Rule and believes in treating people respectfully. If they do not understand this, address it in the next lesson.
  • Using exit tickets allows a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs before the next lesson.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Complete a first read of Chapters 6 and 7, using structured notes. Answer the focus question: What does the reader learn about Jem, Scout, and Boo in these chapters? Use the strongest evidence from the novel in your answer.
  • Provide struggling learners with the supported structured notes for additional scaffolding as they read the novel.

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