Launching The Module: Taking A Stand | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G8:M2A:U1:L1

Launching The Module: Taking A Stand

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different media to present an idea. (RI.8.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can get information from photographs about people who are taking a stand about something.
  • I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from photographs.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Taking a Stand: Frayer Model

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Gallery Walk (13 minutes)

B. Review Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Building Background Knowledge: Taking a Stand (10 minutes)

B. Taking a Stand: Frayer Model (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief Learning Targets (2 minutes)

B. Preview Homework (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Write about what you learned from the photographs about taking a stand.

B. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of learning about taking a stand by only looking at photographs.

  • This lesson launches Module 2 and frames the theme of "taking a stand." Students begin to build their background knowledge of what it means to take a stand. As students engage in a Gallery Walk, they view powerful photographs to help establish an understanding of this concept.
  • Students view a photograph that shows opposing people taking a stand: one person taking a stand for racial integration in schools and another against. This is to show that people can take a stand in both positive and negative ways. For the purpose of this module's study of the theme of taking a stand, students will focus on the idea of taking a stand to help others. They begin this discussion in this lesson and will continue this discussion when they study the novel.
  • Students begin a Taking a Stand: Frayer Model handout. This is designed to support students as they build a deeper understanding of what it means to take a stand, the overarching theme of the module. Be sure students hold onto this handout to work on over several lessons.
  • Review: Gallery Walk (Appendix 1).
  • Post: Materials for Gallery Walk; learning targets.

Vocabulary

taking a stand, advantages, disadvantages, characteristics

Materials

  • Taking a Stand photographs (see links in supporting materials)
  • Notice/Wonder Note-catcher (one per student)
  • Timer
  • Document camera
  • Little Rock Nine photograph, which may be found on the National Park Service's Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site page, at http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/civilrights/ar1.htm (for display)
  • Taking a Stand: Frayer Model (one per student)
  • Taking a Stand: Frayer Model (completed for Teacher Reference)
  • T-chart: Advantages/Disadvantages (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Review Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Notice/Wonder Note-catcher and explain the Gallery Walk protocol:
  • Tell students that in a moment, they will get to examine several Taking a Stand photographs that are posted throughout the room (or along the hallway outside the classroom).
  • At each photograph, they should pause and capture specific details that they notice (e.g., "Child is standing with a sign," "They are holding a banner") and the things that they wonder about ("I wonder why they are serious?" "What are they protesting?" "When was this?").
  • Model for students that an inference is taking clues from the text and using your background knowledge to express thinking about a text. For example: "This picture is about race, and I know this because of the signs the people are holding up and the book I read about Ruby Bridges last year." Clarify for students that it's not an opinion ("I hate this picture").
  • Tell students they will have just a minute at each picture, and that they might not get to all of the pictures.
  • You might need to coach your students about your expectations for safe movement and for quiet voices during this work period. (Ex: "As you move from photograph to photograph, there is no need to engage in side conversations. I expect 'zero' voice levels during this time. Also, please move carefully, taking care not to bump into one another.")
  • Ask them to begin. Use a timer set to 5 minutes to keep students focused on the gallery.
  • As students complete this activity, circulate to observe and support as needed. You might notice that they are making inferences (e.g., "It's about race equality" or "The people are protesting a war"). This is ideal as it provides the basis for the follow-up conversation.
  • After about 5 minutes, ask students to return to their seats. Cold call on several students to share what they noticed and wondered. Once an inference comes up, probe the students about why they said what they said (e.g., "You said you saw a picture about racial equality. What specifically did you see that made you think this?" or "You used your background knowledge to make an inference that the people in the photograph were fighting for racial equality. No picture has the word 'race' in it, does it?").
  • Clarify for students that when they use their background knowledge to add meaning to a picture or text, they are making inferences.
  • Ask students:

     *"What do all of these photographs have in common?" Invite students to turn and talk about this question. While students discuss, circulate and probe to encourage students to move beyond the literal of what they see in the photographs to what they infer about the people in the photographs. Consider questions like:

     *"Why are all of these people holding signs?"

     *"What might be motivating all of these people?"

  • Cold call on student pairs to share their thinking.
  • Students engaged in a similar Gallery Walk in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1. They may benefit from engaging in the Gallery Walk with assigned partners in order to control the sharing and processing they are doing during this time.
  • Consider partnering ELL students who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

B. Review Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read aloud the first learning target:

*"I can get information from photographs about people who are taking a stand about something."

  • Explain to students that they are used to reading words to gather information about something, and today they "read" a different type of text. They looked at photographs to gather information.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with a partner:

*"Based on the photographs you have looked at, what do you think the phrase taking a stand means?"

  • Cold call on student pairs to share their initial thinking on this. Listen for something like: "Taking a stand means to stand up for something you believe in." Explain to students that in a few minutes they will be talking about this idea of taking a stand in more detail. It's fine if students are unclear about this concept at this point; they will be studying this idea throughout the module.
  • Read aloud the second learning target:

*"I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of gathering information from photographs."

  • Share with students that the experience of looking at photographs is different from reading about an event. Ask:

*"What do the words advantages and disadvantages mean?" Invite students to turn and talk.

  • Call on student volunteers to answer the question. Draw students' attention to the prefix "dis-" in the word disadvantage. Remind students that "dis-" means not or the opposite of something. An advantage is a positive thing, and a disadvantage is a negative thing.
  • Share with students that they will be have time to think about the positive advantages and negative disadvantages of looking at photographs alone to understand something.
  • Posting learning targets for students allows them to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Building Background Knowledge: Taking a Stand (10 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted photographs and their Notice/Wonder Note-catchers. Invite students to identify the big idea that the people in the photographs are taking a stand about.
  • Circulate and listen for students to identify the following big ideas related to each of the images:

i. For better jobs and work safety

ii. For ending a war

iii. For women's right to vote

iv. For protecting children with child labor laws

v.  For racial equality, integrated schools

  • Invite students to draw a line under their last entry on their Notice/Wonder Note-catcher. Using the document camera, display the Little Rock Nine photograph. Invite students to silently look at the photograph and jot down what they notice and what they wonder as they look at this photo.
  • After a few minutes, invite students to turn and talk with a partner about what they notice and wonder.
  • Follow up with a few probing questions. Ask:

* "Who is taking a stand in this photograph?" Ideally students will notice that there are two people taking opposite stands in the photo. Invite students to explain how each person is taking a stand in a different way. The white girl is taking a stand against the African American girl, and the African American girl is taking a stand for racial integration.

*"How can taking a stand be a positive and a negative thing?" Allow students to turn and talk before sharing. Ideally students will discuss how taking a stand represents a person's strong beliefs, and those beliefs might be morally and ethically different from someone else's.

  • Share with students that for the purpose of this module, they are going to call something taking a stand when it has to do with trying to help people and not hurt people. They will continue to think critically about this in the coming weeks.

B. Taking a Stand: Frayer Model (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Taking a Stand: Frayer Model handout to students and display it using the document camera. Orient students to each of the four boxes and explain to students that they will begin to develop a deeper understanding of what it means to take a stand over the course of the module, and they will use this Frayer Model organizer to help them. Explain that they will continue to add to this handout over the course of several lessons, so they should leave space within each box to add additional notes.
  • Draw students' attention to the Examples box in the lower left-hand corner of the chart. Invite students to reflect on the examples of taking a stand that they viewed in the photographs. Cold call on several students to share the five examples discussed earlier.
  • Next, draw students' attention to the Definition box in the upper left-hand corner, and invite students to turn and talk about what it means to take a stand. Cold call on several student pairs to share out a definition and write something in the box like: "Taking a stand means to go out of your way to express your belief in something. It means to stand up for what you believe in, not just keep quiet about your beliefs."
  • Next, draw students' attention to the Characteristics/Explanation box in the upper right-hand corner of the handout. Ask students to turn and talk with their partner about the following question:

    *"What characteristics or qualities does a person who takes a stand have?"

  • Cold call on several student pairs to share. Listen for students to name characteristics like courage, boldness, bravery, conviction, strong beliefs, and action.
  • Finally, draw students' attention to the Non-Examples box in the lower right-hand corner. Ask:
  • Cold call on student pairs and record the non-examples. Listen for non-examples like: "Following the crowd" or "Giving in to peer pressure."
  • Explain to students that they will be learning more about people taking a stand in the upcoming lessons.
  • *"What might a person do that's the opposite of taking a stand?" Encourage students to think about the definition and the characteristics listed on the handout, and remind them that they are thinking about the opposite of this.
  • Graphic organizers, like a Frayer Model, provide the necessary scaffolding especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning, and they engage students more actively. For students needing additional support, you may want to provide a partially filled-in graphic organizer.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to reflect on the first learning target (taking a stand). Cold call on several students to share with the class one detail from the Taking a Stand: Frayer Model handout that helped them to understand what it means to take a stand. Be sure students file away their Frayer Model handout to use in future lessons.

B. Preview Homework (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the T-chart: Advantages/Disadvantages handout. Remind students that looking at photographs to learn about taking a stand is different from reading about people taking a stand.
  • Preview the homework. 

Homework

Homework
  • Write about what you learned from the photographs about taking a stand.
  • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of learning about taking a stand by only looking at photographs.

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