Using Effective Search Terms: Researching Screen Time | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U2:L8

Using Effective Search Terms: Researching Screen Time

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources. (W.7.8)
  • I can quote or paraphrase others' work while avoiding plagiarism. (W.7.8)
  • I can use search terms effectively. (W.7.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use search terms effectively to gather relevant information about screen time.
  • I can gather relevant information from "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Answers to Text-dependent Questions: "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price"
  • Venn diagram for Researcher's notebook, sections 5 and 6
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Triad Talk: Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Read-aloud of "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" with Text-Dependent Questions (15 minutes)

B. Contrasting Authors' Use of Evidence (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Using Search Terms Effectively (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish adding "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" into the researcher's notebook, Section 6.

B. Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes).

  • This lesson ties in with the concept of cascading consequences, which will be introduced in Lesson 13. See the module overview and Unit 3 overview for details. Be sure to preview Lesson 13 in advance, so you can foreshadow ideas from that future lesson as you move through the article read here in Lesson 8. In particular, consider having students discuss how the consequences in Question 3 are "cascading consequences"--that is, how one consequence causes another in a domino-type effect.
  • This lesson hinges on the accurate and full completion of two documents: Sections 5 and 6 of the researcher's notebook. Think ahead to whether any previous modifications to these materials for students with special needs will require similar modifications in this lesson. If a student struggles with taking notes, consider pairing him or her with a proficient student or giving examples from the text on sticky notes.
  • This lesson marks the transition to preparing to use self-selected sources from the Internet. To do this successfully, students practice using search terms effectively in Work Time B. They also fill out an exit ticket that can serve as a formative assessment of this skill. You may want to provide feedback on the exit tickets and return them in the next lesson to make sure students are on track.
  • Consider that search results will change according to your school's access to the Internet. It might be helpful to run a "pilot" search on your own, to get a sense of what students' results might be.
  • This lesson is also a continuation and refinement of skills learned in previous lessons within this unit, particularly Lesson 6, when students contrasted different authors' use of evidence. This skill (RI.7.9) will be a part of the mid-unit assessment. The Closing incorporates a Venn diagram similar to that of Lesson 6, contrasting the Sigman video and the text read in this lesson using the researcher's notebook. If time allows, consider asking students to assess the credibility of these sources.
  • Students return to the Triad Talk protocol established in Lesson 1. Consider whether you will continue the same groupings.
  • In advance: Set up a projector and computer (open to a search engine of your choosing) for a quick transition to the Closing.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Speaking and Listening anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
  • Projector and computer
  • "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" (from Lesson 7)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Close Reading Guide: "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" (for teacher reference)
  • Researcher's notebook (from Lesson 4)
  • Four Types of Evidence/Identify the Evidence note-catcher (from Lesson 6)
  • Evaluating an Argument anchor chart (from Lesson 6)
  • Venn diagram (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Lesson 8 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Triad Talk: Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to get into  triads for Triad Talks and respond to this prompt, using the criteria on the Speaking and Listening anchor chart:

*   "Based on what you read for homework, how have you expanded your understanding of screen time? What else are you wondering about the effects of screen time?"

*   "Which of these learning targets do you anticipate will be easiest for you today? Which will offer the most challenge?"

-   "I can use search terms effectively to gather relevant information about screen time."

-   "I can gather relevant information from 'Attached to Technology and Paying the Price.'"

v

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Read-aloud of "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" with Text-Dependent Questions (15 minutes)

  • Have students take out "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price." Distribute Text-Dependent Questions: "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" and display a copy using a document camera. Guide students through the text and this handout by using the Close Reading Guide: "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price"(for teacher reference).
  • Give students a few minutes to begin Section 6 of their researcher's notebooks using  this text and their text-dependent questions for reference. 
  • Keep in mind that this lesson requires visual comparison and written transferal of information. If students are visually or physically challenged, this process might be modified for them ahead of time so they are not unnecessarily impeded. Possible modifications include partially filled-in Venn diagrams, creating a Venn diagram on chart paper and/or lined paper instead of 8.5- by 11-inch paper, or giving the students items from the readings on sticky notes to physically sort on the Venn diagram.
  • Consider giving ELLs or struggling students pictures to illustrate some of the central concepts of the reading.
  • Keep in mind that this lesson requires visual comparison and written transferal of information. If students are visually or physically challenged, this process might be modified for them ahead of time so they are not unnecessarily impeded. Possible modifications include partially filled-in Venn diagrams, creating a Venn diagram on chart paper and/or lined paper instead of 8.5- by 11-inch paper, or giving the students items from the readings on sticky notes to physically sort on the Venn diagram.
  • Consider giving ELLs or struggling students pictures to illustrate some of the central concepts of the reading.

B. Contrasting Authors' Use of Evidence (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that today they will contrast two authors' use of evidence on the topic of screen time, much like they did in Lesson 6. Students will use the Four Types of Evidence/Identify the Evidence note-catcher rom Lesson 6 and the Evaluating an Argument anchor chart to help them analyze the evidence provided.
  • Distribute the Venn diagram.
  • Have students turn to Sections 5 and 6 of the researcher's notebook.
  • Allow students to reread their notes and fill out their Venn diagrams.
  • Invite students to turn to their elbow partners and share what they wrote.
  • After about 2 minutes of discussion, cold call a couple of students to share out with the class.
  • Listen for them to apply their knowledge of the four types of evidence. For example: "Aric Sigman uses research and personal anecdote; 'Attached to Technology--The Toll on Children' uses only personal anecdote."

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Using Search Terms Effectively (15 minutes)

  • Instruct students to listen and underline key lines from the text excerpt you have just read.
  • Ask students to look over their underlining and write down the most important words from the article excerpt. This can include nouns, names, dates, and places.
  • Cold call a couple of students to share out the words they selected. As they listen to each other's words, ask students to raise their hands if they wrote down the same word. Write the most common words on the board. Listen for words such as: "focus," "screen," "leisure time."
  • Using a projector and computer. Demonstrate how you would combine some of those words to run an Internet search (for example, focus + screen time).
  • If possible, project your computer screen and type those search terms into a search engine. Review with students the websites that result.
  • Distribute an Exit Ticket: Lesson 8 to each student. Give them 2 to 3 minutes to fill it out and then collect them. Review their answers and, depending on whether they seem to identify appropriate search terms, you may want to return to this in the next lesson to clarify their understanding.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish adding "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" into the researcher's notebook, Section 6.
  • Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes).

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