Evaluating Sources: The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10) | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U2:L7

Evaluating Sources: The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10)

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.7.4)
  • I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources. (W.7.8)
  • I can evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source. (W.7.8)
  • I can quote or paraphrase others' work while avoiding plagiarism. (W.7.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can consult a dictionary to determine or clarify the meaning of a word.
  • I can evaluate the credibility and accuracy of a source.

Ongoing Assessment

  •  Researcher's notebook, section 4 (from homework)
  • Venn diagram (from Lesson 6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Entry Task: Dictionary Definitions (10 minutes)

B. Homework Review (9 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Brain Development Anchor Chart (10 minutes)

B. The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10) (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reviewing Domain-Specific Vocabulary Chart (1 minute)

4. Homework

A. Read "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price."

B. Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes).

  • This lesson completes the arc of pro-screen time argument texts and begins the arc of anti-screen time argument texts (Lessons 7-8 and Part II of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment). Here, the screen time issues of face-to-face social impact and distraction are addressed by the texts. This balance of argumentative texts ensures that students have a wide and diverse set of information on which to draw when they make the final decision as to what position they will take on the recommendation for screen time in Lesson 17.
  • Work Time B asks you to work further with the concept of positive consequences. In this unit, you will continue to discuss the idea of consequences as you scaffold students' understanding for Unit 3, when they will make a claim about the best recommendation for screen time use, taking into account the consequences of the two approaches available to them.
  • In Work Time B, students view just Part 2 of a 10-part video that can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRi4DPu6WGc.
  • The homework article, "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price," is quite long and reproduced in its entirety here due to copyright issues, and also to give proficient students a challenge if the teacher so desires. Students need to read only about two pages for the assignment.
  • In advance: Have dictionaries or computers accessible for the entry task.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

positive consequences, virtual

Materials

  • Entry task, Lesson 7 (one per student)
  • Class set of dictionaries or computers with Internet access
  • Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Researcher's notebook (from Lesson 4)
  • Teacher Guide: Researcher's Notebook (from Lesson 4)
  • Document camera
  • Brain Development anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 2)
  • Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10; from 00:00-3:03; see Teaching Notes)
  • Digital projector
  • Speaking and Listening anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
  • "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" (one per student and one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entry Task: Dictionary Definitions (10 minutes)

  • As students enter the room, distribute the entry task, Lesson 7 and direct them to use the class set of dictionaries or computers with Internet access to follow the directions on the slip. Depending on numbers, students may need to share these resources.
  • Allow them 5 minutes to fill out their entry tasks. As they are writing, circulate and check which definition of akin the students are writing down. Look for them to write down something such as: "like" or "similar to."
  • When students are finished with the entry task, cold call someone who wrote down the correct definition to share it and why he or she chose it. Add the definition to the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart.
  • Listen for the student to say: "I chose this because I used the context clues of 'flipping through a photo album' to realize that the sentence was saying that using Facebook was similar to flipping through a photo album. The other definitions did not make sense in this context."
  • If any students chose a different definition, discuss the other possibilities and why they do not fit in this context.
  • Let students know that this task served as a quick reminder of the most effective process to look up words. This is something they should be doing often, both as their researcher's notebook requires and as they encounter new and interesting words in their reading.
  • When possible, have students who need physical activity take on the active role of managing the distribution and collection of materials.

B. Homework Review (9 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn to their homework in the researcher's notebook.
  • Display Section 4 of the Teacher Guide: Researcher's Notebook under the document camera.
  • Ask students to turn to a partner and briefly discuss the gist of their reading last night. Call on volunteers for answers. Listen for: "When people use Facebook to review their own lives and connections with friends and families, it helps them feel more positive mentally."
  • Review the rest of Section 4 with the students, making sure they are aware that they may have different but equally valid answers. Ask for volunteers to share some of the paraphrased information, vocabulary, and additional research questions that they developed. Should anyone volunteer information that is inaccurate, gently guide them to more valid answers, asking the class members for their input.
  • Have students look at the Brain Connections box of Section 4 and ask something like the following:
  • "How did you think the information in this article might connect to our knowledge of teen brain science? Discuss this with a partner for a few minutes. Develop an "if ... then" statement we can use. Use the Brain Development anchor chart as a reference."
  • Model one of these statements for the students by writing it on the Brain Development anchor chart: "If using Facebook helps people feel more positive, then it might have an even stronger impact on teens because of the stronger reward system."
  • Ask students to volunteer some "if/then" statements. Listen for statements such as: "If teens use Facebook a lot, then their neurons might prune themselves so that they have a positive response mentally to Facebook." Record these on the anchor chart and ask students to write them down in their researcher's notebooks.
  • Be prepared to further model these statements if students are still getting used to the challenge of making the connection between brain science and their reading.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Brain Development Anchor Chart (10 minutes)

  • Have students take out their Venn diagrams from Lesson 6. Remind them that the class has spent the past several lessons reading pro-screen time argumentative texts. Let students know that you are now going to wrap up the pro-screen time arguments by connecting the information on the Venn diagram to the Brain Development anchor chart. As in the Opening, ask something like:

*    "How did you think the information in these articles might connect to our knowledge of teen brain science? Discuss this with a partner for a few minutes. Develop an "if/then" statement we can use. Use the Brain Development anchor chart as a reference."

  • Releasing gradually from the Opening, do not model now. Instead, if needed, circulate and offer individual assistance.
  • Ask students to volunteer some "if/then" statements. Listen for statements such as: "If teens experience 'blissful productivity,' then it might indicate that the risk/reward system in the brain is in high operation during video games" or "If teens are good at video games, then it might be because of synaptic pruning; they shape their brains by putting so many hours into playing.'"
  • Record these on the anchor chart and ask students to write them down in their researcher's notebooks.

B. The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10) (15 minutes)

  • Have students turn to Section 5 of their researcher's notebooks as you cue up The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10) on the digital projector.
  • Lead them through filling in the top header with the appropriate information for the video.
  • Explain that you will play a short video of child psychologist Aric Sigman, who is based in the United Kingdom. He is speaking to a professional association of educators, trying to persuade them to adopt a resolution that screen time needs to be reduced for children. Tell students that the video starts in the middle of Dr. Sigman's presentation, so it "jumps in" to the content quickly; he is discussing the first- and second-world countries he has visited that have been negatively affected by an increase in the use of social media and computers.
  • Let students know that they will watch the video three times. The first time through, they should listen for the claim.
  • Play The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10) (00:00-3:03) once.
  • In the Paraphrased Information section, have students write down what they think the claim is. Cold call one or two to share the claim. Listen for them to say the claim is that screen time negatively affects the amount of time children spending interacting with family and loved ones face-to-face.
  • Explain that students will watch the video two more times, just as they would reread a text. As they watch again, ask them to write down the reasons and evidence that support the claim.
  • Play the video a second time, then give students about 2 minutes to add to their notes independently.
  • Play the video a third time, again giving students a few minutes to add to their notes.
  • After students have finished writing, ask them to form groups of three and compare their work. Encourage them to talk about any discrepancies in their answers and revise their work accordingly. Refer them to the Speaking and Listening anchor chart so they can practice those skills while working on revisions together.
  • Cold call students to share the reasons and evidence. Refer to the Teacher Guide: Researcher's Notebook for possible responses.
  • Using the skills students practiced in the Opening, have them complete the Vocabulary section for the word virtual, as in this sentence from the video: "Life has become virtual." Cold call students, listening for an answer such as: "being similar to something, but not that thing in fact."
  • Finally, have the students work on the Brain Connections box independently. Ask them to volunteer some "if/then" statements, such as: "If young people spend too much time on screens, then it might be because of the limbic system's role in risk and reward." Record these on the anchor chart and ask students to write them down in their researcher's notebooks.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Domain-Specific Vocabulary Chart (1 minute)

  • Ask:

*    "What new words were in today's video that we should add to the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart?"

  • Cold call students and listen for them to provide vocabulary words such as virtual. Write those words on the chart.
  • Hand out "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price" for homework. Let students know that they can skim the article, which is quite long, but to read carefully the first page and the section titled "The Toll on Children."
  • Consider watching the video one last time for this vocabulary work.
  • Consider handing out only the pertinent sections of the homework to a student who might be overwhelmed by large amounts of text.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "Attached to Technology and Paying the Price."  
  • Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes).

 

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up