End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Presenting a Claim | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U2:L19

End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Presenting a Claim

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can present claims and findings with descriptions, facts, details, and examples. (SL.7.4)
  • I can use effective speaking techniques (appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation). (SL.7.4)
  • I can include multimedia components and visual displays in a presentation to clarify claims and to add emphasis. (SL.7.5)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when indicated or appropriate. (SL.7.6)
  • I can use my experience and knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (RI.7.9a and SL.7.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can present my claim about the AAP recommendation using facts, reasons, details, and examples.
  • I can use effective speaking techniques in my presentation.
  • I can include a multimedia visual display in my presentation to clarify my claim and add emphasis.
  • I can use formal English in my presentation.
  • I can use my experience and knowledge of language and logic to advocate persuasively.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Visual display
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Entry Task (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Presenting a Claim (35 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Catch up on any outstanding homework from Unit 2.

B. Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes).

  • In this lesson, students engage in the End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2. They previewed this during Lesson 18. This assessment focuses on SL.7.4, SL.7.5, SL.7.6, RI.7.9a, and SL.7.2a. Because students are being assessed on their speaking skills, a checklist rather than a rubric is used. The purpose of a checklist is to facilitate teacher recording of skills during the presentation itself.
  • At the start of Work Time, you simply clarify the expectations for how students' work will be assessed.
  • This lesson is designed to allow choice as to how best to set up the presentations in classrooms. There are several options:

-   Option A: Whole class presentations. In this option, each student presents his or her claim to the whole class, and you can assess each presentation as it happens. If you choose this option, consider giving the audience a task to do while listening, such as adding new information and ideas to their Cascading Consequences charts or being responsible for jotting down at least one important idea that they heard. Option A may take more than one class period.

-   Option B: Small group presentations #1. For this option, split students up into groups of four or five with a mix of claims. Then, invite other teachers and/or support staff to come in as guest assessors and pair each adult with a small group. Give each adult enough copies of the End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2 to assess his or her group members. Consider either focusing on one group yourself (perhaps with some of the students who may need more support presenting) or leave yourself without a group and circulate while students are presenting. Also, if possible, consider sending some groups into different rooms or spaces so that simultaneous presentations do not disturb one another.

-   Option C: Small group presentations #2. Split students into groups of four or five. Instead of inviting other adults in as guest assessors, in this option you could distribute the presentations over two or three class periods and assess each student yourself. Each class period, start the students with work they can complete independently, such as continuing their independent reading. Then, while students are working, pull one group at a time to present to you and each other.

  • The work that students have done to decide on and support their claim has prepared them for writing a position paper in Unit 3.
  • In advance: Decide how best to do presentations in your classroom.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Decision Statement graphic organizer (from Lesson 17; one per student)
  • Visual displays (from Lesson 18; students' own)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Presenting a Claim (for teacher reference; one to display; see Teaching Notes)
  • Exit ticket (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Entry Task (5 minutes)

  • As students enter, ask them to get out their Decision Statement graphic organizers and visual displays. Direct them to review their claim and evidence, as well as their visual display, in preparation for the day's work.
  • After 3 minutes, refocus the class. Point to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can present my claim about the AAP recommendation using facts, reasons, details, and examples."

*   "I can use effective speaking techniques in my presentation."

*   "I can include a multimedia visual display in my presentation to clarify my claim and add emphasis."

*   "I can use formal English in my presentation."

*   "I can use my experience and knowledge of language and logic to advocate persuasively."

  • Remind students that they have practiced these skills, and now they are ready to present their claims.

Work Time

Work Time

A. End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Presenting a Claim (35 minutes)

  • Let students know how excited you are to see their presentations. Emphasize the importance of being a respectful audience member, including:

-   Not talking during a classmate's presentation

-   Reacting appropriately (e.g., it's OK to laugh, as long as the presenter has made a joke)

-   Showing appreciation at the end (applause or finger snaps)

  • Display the End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Presenting a Claim (for teacher reference). Let students know that this is how they will be assessed.
  • Explain the logistics of the presentations. These will vary depending on how you decide to set them up. (See Teaching Notes for further guidance.)
  • Encourage students to do their best in their presentations and to keep in mind the speaking skills they have practiced. Remind them to speak clearly, make eye contact, and use their visual displays.
  • If necessary, ask them to physically transition to their group and begin their presentations. If students are presenting to the whole class, invite the first student to the front of the classroom to begin.
  • When students are finished, collect their Decision Statement graphic organizers and visual displays.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Congratulate students on their hard work and acknowledge those who were respectful, engaged audience members. It is especially effective to point out specific things that students did, such as listening actively, supporting others, keeping full attention on the speakers, and other positive behaviors.
  • Distribute the exit ticket to students who presented. Ask them to reflect on how they did in their presentations by rating themselves on the learning targets:

*   "I can present my claim about the AAP recommendation using facts, reasons, details, and examples."

*   "I can use effective speaking techniques in my presentation."

*   "I can include a multimedia visual display in my presentation to clarify my claim and add emphasis."

*   "I can use formal English in my presentation."

*   "I can use my experience and knowledge of language and logic to advocate persuasively."

  • Collect the exit tickets. Remind students that their homework is to continue their independent reading.

Homework

Homework
  • Catch up on any outstanding homework from Unit 2.
  • Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes). 

Note: Give students feedback on their Decision Statement graphic organizers and be prepared to hand them back during the next lesson. These graphic organizers will be the starting point for students' work on their position papers in Unit 3.

Also give feedback on students' visual displays. For the Unit 3 performance task, students will create a visual representation of their position paper, and feedback on their visual displays will help strengthen their final products. Be prepared to give these back by Lesson 9 of Unit 3.

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