Choosing a Position: Screen Time and Adolescents | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U2:L17

Choosing a Position: Screen Time and Adolescents

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.7.1)
  • I can select evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.7.9)
  • I can self-select a text based on personal preferences and read it independently. (RI.7.11a)
  • I can read grade-level literary texts proficiently and independently. (RL.7.9)
  • I can read grade-level informational texts proficiently and independently. (RI.7.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can select text-based evidence from my research to support my position on the AAP recommended screen time.
  • I can read independently and proficiently.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Thinking Log

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Entry Task: Independent Reading Check-in (15 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

2. Work Time

A. Choose a Position (10 minutes)

B. Decision Statement Graphic Organizer (14 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Thinking Log and Share Out (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish your Decision Statement graphic organizer in preparation for your presentation. Review your sources.

  • This lesson serves as the transition between exploring whether or not to raise the AAP's screen time recommendation to endorsing one side or the other. Building off the Fishbowl in Lesson 16, in which students heard both sides, they will now home in on one side. To do so, they will think about it, talk about it, and write about it. These three activities used in concert will provide students with a strong foundation for their writing in Unit 3.
  • Today's lesson allows for some reflection in students' Thinking Logs on how the Fishbowls have helped to refine and clarify their thinking about this topic. It would be beneficial to have students share these ideas with each other to debrief. Also consider collecting the Thinking Logs and using excerpts as part of a classroom display to document students' learning.
  • Remember that the Fishbowl is the first half of the End of Unit 2 Assessment; the second half is the presentation of a visual aid (Lessons 18 and 19) based on students' research and Fishbowl discussion. This engaging task is also an important step in the writing process. In this lesson, students start to prepare for this presentation by answering probing questions to help them clarify their position on the overarching research question: "After examining both the potential benefits and risks of entertainment screen time, particularly to the development of teenagers, make a recommendation. Should the AAP raise its recommended daily entertainment screen time from two hours to four hours?" They also fill out graphic organizers that will help them capture their thoughts.
  • Applaud students for their hard work up to this point: Preparing for and defending a position (which they may not actually agree with) in the Fishbowl takes intellectual effort. Assure them that now that they know a great deal about the issue and have carefully considered both sides, they are ready to make a personal, informed decision about which side they believe to be the strongest. They also get to be more creative with how they express their opinions, including a visual representation of their thinking.
  • To begin this lesson, students perform one of their routine independent reading check-ins. Use whichever structure you have established with your class to do this. For ideas, see the stand-alone document on EngageNY.org: "Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan." The routine you have or will establish should support students in checking to see if they met their previous goal and set a new goal, allow students to talk about their books with a peer, and give you a chance to confer with some students about their reading. By bringing their independent reading into class, this routine both motivates students and holds them accountable.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Comparing Risks and Benefits chart for teens on screens (from Lesson 14; one per student)
  • Position Paper Prompt anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
  • Brain Development anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 2)
  • Fishbowl Statement (from Lesson 16; returned here with feedback)
  • Probing questions (one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Decision Statement graphic organizer (one per student)
  • Thinking Logs (from Unit 1, Lesson 2; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entry Task: Independent Reading Check-in (15 minutes)

  • Use this time for an independent reading check-in, using whichever routine you have established with your class. For ideas, see the stand-alone document on EngageNY.org: "Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan." Remember that in this time:

-   Students need time to talk with a peer about their book.

-   You need a chance to confer with students about their reading (you will confer with a few each time, working your way through a class over several weeks).

-   Students need to check in to see if they met their last goal and then set a new goal.

  • Consider inviting coordinating service providers to your class to check in with students who need more reading support. This is an opportunity to ensure that students comprehend their independent reading and to monitor their progress.
  • In the next independent reading check-in, prioritize talking with students who did not meet their goals.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (1 minute)

  • Read aloud today's learning targets:

*   "I can select text-based evidence from my research to support my position on the AAP recommended screen time."

*   "I can read independently and proficiently."

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Choose a Position (10 minutes)

  • Return the Fishbowl Statement from Lesson 16. Tell students to get out all of their notes and graphic organizers, and specifically the Comparing Risks and Benefits chart for teens on screens.
  • Draw students' attention to the two anchor charts posted, which can also provider information: the Position Paper prompt anchor chart and the Brain Development anchor chart.
  • Applaud students for their hard work up to this point: Preparing for and defending a position (which they may not actually agree with) in the Fishbowl takes intellectual effort. Assure them that now that they know a great deal about the issue and have carefully considered both sides, they are ready to make a personal, informed decision about which side they believe to be the strongest. They will also get to be more creative with how they express their opinions, including a visual representation of their thinking.
  • Tell them they will have one more chance to consider the evidence before they make their final decision. Ask them to take 2 minutes to thoughtfully consider the evidence in their notes and charts.
  • When the 2 minutes are over, project the Probing Questions with the document camera and read one question at a time aloud to the class. After each question, pause and allow students to respond in conversation with their seat partners.
  • Encourage students to refer to their sources of information. You may wish to post sentence starters such as:

*   "If ________________as McGonigal states is true, then_________________."

*   "According to __________, the effect of screen time is __________ and therefore__________."

*   "As we read in "Teens and Decision Making," if_________________ and if _______________, then__________________."

  • Providing sentence stems helps all students, but helps ELLs in particular.

B. Decision Statement Graphic Organizer (14 minutes)

  • After allowing students to discuss their thoughts about each question, distribute the Decision Statement graphic organizer and give them time to start filling in some of their ideas. Insist that this be done individually and quietly.
  • Remind students they are looking for text-based evidence and encourage them to reread texts and review their notes, Thinking Logs, and the class anchor chart as they are working.
  • Circulate as they do this to provide support and answer any questions.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Thinking Log and Share Out (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to fill out the final entry in their Thinking Logs for Lesson 17: "How did the Fishbowls clarify your thinking about entertainment screen time and adolescent development?"
  • Give them 2 minutes to write.
  • For the remaining 3 minutes, ask if any students would like to share their entries aloud for the whole class. Call on volunteers.
  • Collect the Thinking Logs. Consider using excerpts from them for a classroom display.

Homework

Homework
  • Fill out your Decision Statement graphic organizer in preparation for your presentation. Review your sources of information.

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