End of Unit 2 Assessment, Parts 1A and 1B: Fishbowl on Screen Time and Adolescents | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U2:L16

End of Unit 2 Assessment, Parts 1A and 1B: Fishbowl on Screen Time and Adolescents

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can present claims and findings with descriptions, facts, details, and examples, using effective speaking techniques (appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation). (SL.7.4)
  • I can come to discussions prepared to refer to evidence on the topic, text, or issue that probes and reflects on ideas under discussion. (SL.7.1 and SL.7.1a)
  • I can use my experience and knowledge of language and logic, as well as culture, to think analytically, address problems creatively, and advocate persuasively. (RI.7.9a and SL.7.9a)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.7.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can prepare for a class discussion and participate in it effectively by collecting and explaining appropriate evidence to support my claims.
  • I can engage with my peers to discuss the recommended screen time by the AAP and persuade them to agree with my point of view using logic, evidence, and appropriate speaking techniques to advocate for my position.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Fishbowl graphic organizer (from homework)
  • Fishbowl Statement
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Parts 1A and 1B: Fishbowl

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Fishbowl Statement (5 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets and Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1A: Fishbowl (15 minutes)

B. Reflection and Transition (3 minutes)

C. End of Unit Assessment, Part 1B: Fishbowl (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflection (2 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes). There will be an independent reading check-in tomorrow.
 

  • This lesson is in many ways a culmination and celebration of the reading and research students have done thus far in this unit. It provides an opportunity for each student to share his or her learning aloud with the class, as well as to learn from classmates' research before committing to a position. The students are put into like-minded groups intentionally to encourage them to work together to deepen their arguments.
  • The Fishbowl Statement is a written synthesis of the preparation students have done for homework the night before and addresses the standard W.7.1, which asks students to advocate persuasively. Consider collecting and assessing it to see how your students are performing on that standard. However, it may be useful to the students in Lesson 17.
  • Review the Fishbowl Prep: Teacher Model (see supporting materials) to prepare to model the speaking techniques you are asking students to use during the Fishbowl (such as appropriate volume and eye contact). Explain that you are modeling a third option--whether Facebook should raise its minimum age to 18--instead of teenagers and screen time so they can learn from you without giving any "answers" away. Review the model essay from Unit 3 to assist you.
  • Remember that the Fishbowl is the first half of the End of Unit 2 Assessment; the second half is the presentation of a visual aid (Lessons 18 and 19) based on students' research and the Fishbowl discussion. You will want to review the Unit 2 assessments as soon as possible, as Lesson 18 builds on the feedback you provide.
  • In advance:

-   Decide how best to group your students for the two Fishbowls. Consider the individual strengths and personalities of each of your students and group them mindfully. Post the list of students on the board and consider passing out the assignment cards as students enter.

-   Review the Fishbowl protocol (see Appendix). You may like to keep a tally of how many times each student participates. Or you may prefer to assess using a checklist as students are speaking. You might even consider videotaping the Fishbowl to watch and assess later. Consider how you can be helpful in facilitating discussion and consider pulling some salient quotes from the texts that encourage discussion. You may distribute these to a few students ahead of time.

-   Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

advocate

Materials

  • Assignment cards (optional; for teacher use)
  • Fishbowl Statement (one per student)
  • Teens and Screens Fishbowl graphic organizer, Parts I and II (from Lesson 15; one per student)
  • Fishbowl Prep: Teacher Model (for teacher reference)
  • Discussion protocols (from Lesson 15; one to display)
  • Document camera
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1 (one per student and one to display)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Teacher Assessment Checklist (for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Fishbowl Statement (5 minutes)

  • As students enter the room, distribute the assignment cards (if you choose to) and the Fishbowl Statement. Ask them to take out their Teens and Screens Fishbowl graphic organizer, Parts I and II as a reference to help them fill out the Fishbowl Statement.
  • After a few minutes, tell the students you will collect the tickets at the end of the class period.

B. Reviewing Learning Targets and Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets aloud:

*   "I can prepare for a class discussion and participate it in effectively by collecting and explaining appropriate evidence to support my claims."

*   "I can engage with my peers to discuss the recommended screen time by the AAP and persuade them to agree with my point of view using logic, evidence, and appropriate speaking techniques to advocate for my position."

  • Ask students to raise their hands if they think they know what the word advocate means. Cold call a student who has raised his or her hand.
  • Listen for: "help," "support," or "persuade." You may want to reiterate that "to advocate for" something is to support it and defend it, and that the noun form of advocate means "a supporter."
  • Explain that you will now model the learning targets using a slightly different prompt. You will argue that the AAP should recommend that Facebook raise its minimum age to 18.
  • Use the Fishbowl Prep: Teacher Model (for teacher reference) as a guide as you model the appropriate speaking techniques you would like students to use in the Fishbowl.
  • When you are done, ask:

*   "What speaking techniques did you notice me use?"

  • Cold call several students to share out. Listen for: "You looked at us, not just your paper," "You spoke in a respectful tone," "You spoke loudly enough for us to hear you," and "You spoke formally and used vocabulary words."
  • Display the discussion protocols on the document camera. Invite students to read the checklist and note whether you followed all of the criteria (except taking notes). Remind them that these are the discussion protocols they practiced in Lesson 15.
  • Ask students to hold up a Fist to Six (since there are six criteria) to show how many of the items on the checklist you displayed.
  • Look at how many fingers students are holding up. If any students rate you lower than a six, call on them and ask them to clarify what they saw.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1A: Fishbowl (15 minutes)

  • Distribute the End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1.
  • Review this document with the class by calling on several students to read different sections aloud. Stop and check for understanding before you move on.
  • Announce that the group of students defending the recommendation of two hours will go first. Invite students to make two concentric circles with their desks, with those assigned to two hours on the inside. Remind them to bring their Teens and Screens Fishbowl graphic organizer, Part I with them.
  • Tell students on the outside to take notes in the space provided on their Teens and Screens Fishbowl graphic organizer, Part I. This is a good opportunity for them to deepen their thinking on this claim.
  • Remind students on the inner circle of the speaking techniques and sentence starters (if you have posted them). Emphasize that the more they can connect to and build on what their classmates have said, the more successful the conversation will be. Ask students to encourage each other to speak and to invite each other's ideas.
  • Explain that you will announce the official start and end of the Fishbowl, and you will step in only to ask clarifying questions if necessary.
  • Begin the Fishbowl by rereading the prompt: "Defend this claim: Given the potential benefits and risks of screen time on the development of teenagers, the AAP should keep its recommended daily screen time to two hours." Announce that the Fishbowl will now begin.
  • Allow students to talk for approximately 10 minutes, depending on the direction the conversation is heading and its general flow. Feel free to interject if you feel that a student would benefit by being prodded with a clarifying question or an invitation to speak. Also, feel free to use prepared quotes from the readings if the discussion is waning (see Teaching Note).
  • Use the End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1: Teacher Assessment Checklist (for teacher reference) to assess the students.
  • Give students a 2-minute warning before you end the Fishbowl.
  • After the allotted time, during a natural stopping place, announce that the Fishbowl Part 1A will now conclude.
  • Consider posting sentence starters such as:

-   "I believe _____ because ___."

-   "I agree with _____because ___."

-   "I disagree with ______because __."

-   "I want to add to _________'s comment and say _______."

-   "I think we should consider ______."

-   "I'm glad you said that because ___."

  • Consider posting sentence stems to encourage students to refer to their sources. You might post something such as:

-   "If ________________ as McDonigal states is true, then _________________."

-   "According to __________, the effect of screen time is __________ and therefore __________."

-   "As we read in 'Teens and Decision Making,' if _________________ and if _______________, then __________________."

B. Reflection and Transition (3 minutes)

  • Ask students on the outside of the circle to hold up a Fist to Five, demonstrating how well they think the class collectively achieved the learning targets. Read them one at a time:

*   "I can prepare for a class discussion and participate it in effectively by collecting and explaining appropriate evidence to support my claims."

*   "I can engage with my peers to discuss the recommended screen time by the AAP and persuade them to agree with my point of view using logic, evidence, and appropriate speaking techniques to advocate for my position."

  • Notice and name some of the strengths you saw in the Fishbowl. If possible, say one positive thing for each student.
  • Invite students to switch seats. Students on the outside of the circle should come to the inside and vice versa. Remind them to bring their Teens and Screens Fishbowl graphic organizer, Part II and Fishbowl Statement with them.

C. End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1B: Fishbowl (15 minutes)

  • Announce that this group of students will now recommend that the daily screen time should be four hours. Remind the students on the outer circle to take notes on Part II of their graphic organizer.
  • Remind students of the speaking techniques and sentence starters. Emphasize that the more they can connect to and build on what their classmates have said, the more successful the conversation will be. Ask them to encourage each other to speak and to invite each other's ideas.
  • Explain that you will announce the official start and end of the Fishbowl, and you will step in only to ask clarifying questions if necessary.
  • Begin the Fishbowl by rereading the prompt: "Defend this claim: Given the potential benefits and risks of screen time on the development of teenagers, the AAP should raise its recommended daily screen time to four hours." Announce that the Fishbowl will now begin.
  • Allow students to talk for approximately 10 minutes, depending on the direction the conversation is heading and its general flow. Feel free to interject if you feel that a student would benefit by being prodded with a clarifying question or an invitation to speak. Also, feel free to use prepared quotes from the readings if the discussion is waning (see Teaching Note).
  • Give students a 2-minute warning before you end the Fishbowl.
  • After the allotted time, during a natural stopping place, announce that the Fishbowl Part 1B will now conclude.
  • Some students may need extra encouragement to participate in the Fishbowl and share their ideas out loud. Use your discretion to interject if you notice that a student has not spoken yet and say something like: "I'd like to invite any students who haven't spoken yet to share their opinions." Alternatively, you could ask individual students to share their ideas in a supportive way. Use your judgment as to what would be most supportive to each individual student. You could also select certain students as "leaders" in advance and ask them privately to help prompt quieter students to speak during the Fishbowl.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Reflection (2 minutes)

  • Ask students on the outside of the circle to hold up a Fist to Five, demonstrating how well they think the class collectively achieved the learning targets. Read them one at a time:

*   "I can prepare for a class discussion and participate it in effectively by collecting and explaining appropriate evidence to support my claims."

*   "I can engage with my peers to discuss the recommended screen time by the AAP and persuade them to agree with my point of view using logic, evidence, and appropriate speaking techniques to advocate for my position."

  • Notice and name some of the strengths you saw in the Fishbowl. If possible, say one positive thing for each student.
  • Collect the Fishbowl Statement. Use as formative assessment. If possible, return it in the next lesson, as it will be useful for students as they articulate their claim.

Homework

Homework
  • Transfer your notes from the Teens and Screens Fishbowl graphic organizer to the Comparing Risks and Benefits chart.
  • When you are done, Continue independent reading (at least 20 minutes). There will be an independent reading check-in tomorrow.

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