Close Reading: Excerpt 5 of “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U1:L8

Close Reading: Excerpt 5 of “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.7.1)
  • I can read above-grade-level texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.7.10)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.7.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the main idea in Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution."
  • I can use a variety of strategies to figure out the meaning of new vocabulary.
  • I can read above-grade-level texts with support.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Homework: Excerpt 4 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution"
  • Excerpt 4 text-dependent questions
  • Thinking Logs

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Entry Task: Defining Vocabulary Words from Unit 1 (2 minutes)

B.  Sharing Unit I Vocabulary (6 minutes)

C.  Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Analyzing the Main Idea (7 Minutes)

B.  Excerpt 5: Text-Dependent Questions (18 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Thinking Logs (4 minutes)

B.  Adding to the Brain Development Anchor Chart (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students continue to read excerpts from "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." See Teaching Notes from Lesson 5 for more on this text. As this is their third encounter with the text-dependent question activity, students will work more independently today.
  • This excerpt centers on social interaction in the digital world. Today's learning is central to understanding the model essay in Unit 3.
  • As in Lesson 7, students will add "if/then" statements to their Brain Development anchor chart. Being able to practice making inferences from science will scaffold them toward creating their position paper in Unit 3. Remind students to use words and phrases like "may" and "it seems reasonable" to mirror the cautionary tone of scientists.
  • Collect but do not grade Homework: Excerpt 4 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." Rather, use it as formative assessment. Students will need it again in Lesson 9.
  • In advance:

-   Load the multimedia feature from the New York Times Web site: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/21/technology/20101121-brain-interactive.html?ref=technology.

-   Prepare Quiz-Quiz-Trade cards (see supporting materials) and review the Quiz-Quiz-Trade protocol.

-   Decide how best to group students into triads for Work Time B.

-   Consider posting the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

No new vocabulary

Materials

(From The New York Times, November 20, 2010 (c) 2010 The New York Times. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of this Content without express written permission is prohibited.)

  • Digital projector
  • Analyzing the Main Ideas: Sam Crocker (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" (one per student)
  • Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" text-dependent questions (one per student; one to display)
  • Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference)
  • Document camera
  • Thinking Logs (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Brain Development anchor chart--student version (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Brain Development anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Note cards or sticky notes (two per student pairs)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entry Task: Defining Vocabulary Words from Unit 1 (2 minutes)

  • Distribute one vocabulary card for each student from the Unit 1 Vocabulary Quiz-Quiz-Trade cards.
  • Ask students to write the definition of the word on the back of the card. Remind them that they can use their prior neurologist notebook entries or any of their readings to define the word. If you have posted the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart, you may suggest the students use it. Consider covering it at this time but letting the students reference it after step 6 to check themselves.
  • If students need help defining the word, prompt them to look at their neurologist notebooks, Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart, or other classroom resources.
  • Consider allowing students to choose from multiple representations (words, pictures, etc.) on the back of the Quiz-Quiz-Trade card to help define the word.
  • Checking in with learning targets helps students self-assess their learning. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners most.

B. Sharing Unit 1 Vocabulary (6 minutes)

  • Let students know that they will be doing the Quiz-Quiz-Trade protocol. Briefly review the directions:
  1. When prompted, find a partner and show him or her the vocabulary word on your card.
  2. Your partner will use his or her resources to try to define your word.
  3. Then the process repeats, with you defining your partner's word.
  4. After both of you have tried to determine the meaning of the words, share the correct definitions, then trade cards and find new partners.
  5. Clarify directions as needed, and then invite the class to begin. Circulate to guide students and to listen in on their understanding of the words.
  6. Once students have partnered up four times, ask them to return to their seats.
  • Allowing students to discuss with a partner before writing or sharing with the whole class is a low-stress strategy to help them process in a risk-free situation.

C. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Read the day's learning targets aloud or ask a volunteer to do so.
  • Remind students of the Fist to Five technique (introduced in Module 1).
  • Cold call a few students to provide evidence for the rating they gave themselves.
  • Tell students that today they will review the homework in preparation for their end of unit assessment (in Lesson 10), during which they will need to identify and evaluate arguments.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Main Idea (7 minutes)

  • Distribute Analyzing the Main Ideas: Sam Crocker.
  • Direct the students' attention to the multimedia feature "Students and Technology: Constant Companions" cued up on the digital projector.
  • Play the audio under "The Illusion of Social Interaction: Sam Crocker." The audio is 1:18. Repeat the audio at least two more times.
  • Give students a minute to write down their thoughts. Then cold call on students. Use Analyzing the Main Ideas: Sam Crocker (answers, for teacher reference) for suggested responses.

B. Excerpt 5: Text-Dependent Questions (18 minutes)

  • Arrange students in pairs.
  • Distribute Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." Also distribute Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" Text-Dependent Questions and display a copy on a document camera.
  • Work through this handout in concert with the Excerpt 5 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" Close Reading Guide.
  • Keep students in pairs for the Closing activities.
  • Note: Remember to collect Homework: Excerpt 4 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution."
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes comprehension and fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.

 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Thinking Logs (4 minutes)

  • Ask students to retrieve their Thinking Logs (from Lesson 2) and answer the questions for Lesson 8:

-   In "Attention Economy," Dr. Giedd argues that "real-life" activities like traditional homework, talking to friends, and working toward a long-term goal usually don't provide the same jolt of dopamine of media devices. Why might that be a problem for students?

-   What else are you wondering about the adolescent brain's development?

  • After a few minutes, ask students to "popcorn" out their answers.

B. Adding to the Brain Development Anchor Chart (6 minutes)

  • Refer to the Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference) as needed for this section of the lesson.
  • Remind students that the class has been practicing making "if/then" statements from the reading.
  • Invite students to retrieve their Brain Development anchor chart--student version and focus their attention on the class Brain Development anchor chart. Add new information to the "prefrontal cortex" column of the anchor chart and ask students to do the same on their own copies:

-   "The PFC is central hub of social circuitry. (Giedd)"

  • Ask students to turn and talk with their partner:

*   "What 'if/then' statement can you make from the learning about the social brain today?"

  • After a minute, ask students to share out. Circle the statement you just wrote and draw a line to the "So what?" column. Write something like:

-   "If the PFC is the social hub and it is still developing in teens, then teens may still need practice with social skills."

-   "If there are non-verbal social cues that can only be learned in the physical presence of a person, then if someone is mostly socializing online he or she may not learn those skills."

  • Distribute note cards (or sticky notesif the class anchor chart is posted on the wall).
  • Ask students to make at least two more "if/then" statements with their partner. They can use their learning from today or from any other reading.
  • Look for students to write things like:

-   If you're extra sensitive to dopamine, then you may crave activities that activate dopamine more.

-   If you are synaptic pruning based on your behavior, then your behavior may be shaping your brain.

-   If your prefrontal cortex isn't fully available, then you should ask for help when you make decisions.

  • Students may place their sticky notes on the anchor chart as they leave (if it's on chart paper) or hand in their note cards. Be sure they write their names on them. Transfer the students' ideas to the class anchor chart either during or after class.
  • Consider supporting your struggling students by providing half of the If/Then statement. You may prompt them with:
  • If you're extra sensitive to dopamine then...
  • If there are non-verbal social cues that can only be learned in the physical presence of a person then if you are mostly socializing online....

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

 

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