Close Reading: Excerpt 3 of “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U1:L7

Close Reading: Excerpt 3 of “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.7.1)
  • I can read above-grade-level texts with scaffolding and support. (RI.7.10)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.7.4)
  • I can analyze the organization of an informational text (including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas). (RI.7.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify text-based evidence that does or does not support the main idea of an informational text.
  • I can read "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" with support.
  • I can analyze photos, video, and quotes to find a main idea.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" text-dependent questions
  • Thinking Logs

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Analyzing the Evidence Entry Task (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Close Reading of Excerpt 3 (18 minutes)

B.  Revisit Gallery Walk (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Thinking Log (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read Homework: Excerpt 4 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" and answer the questions.

B.  Continue to read your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students continue to read excerpts from "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." See the Teaching Notes from Lesson 5 for more about this text.
  • This excerpt centers on the effects of video games on the brain. Because students will be reading several texts in Unit 2 about video games, today's learning will be important. Be sure to take the time in Work Time A to record key information on the class Brain Development anchor chart. Students will continue to focus on the last column of their anchor chart, writing "if/then" statements. This practice will scaffold the students toward creating their position paper in Unit 3. Be sure to emphasize that they should use words and phrases like "may" and "it seems reasonable" to mirror the cautionary tone of scientists.
  • Students will revisit the Gallery Walk from Lesson 1 to think about what they now know and what they still would like to understand better. This reflective process helps them build on new understandings. A self-monitoring or metacognitive approach can help students develop the ability to take control of their own learning, define learning goals, and monitor their progress.
  • As in the Gallery Walk in Lesson 1, item 1 is a short video, which students can watch on a computer in the classroom. Cue up the Web page before class starts so that students can click "play" as they get to the station. Choose whether students will use headphones or listen at the station in small groups (quietly so that it will not disrupt others).
  • The lesson opens with an activity that is designed to help students progress toward RI.7.1. Students weed out irrelevant evidence that does not support the main idea of the text they read in Lesson 6. This is patterned after one of the questions on the end of unit assessment. If you find your students struggling with this, you may want to take more time on this portion of the lesson.
  • In advance:

-   Load the multimedia feature from the New York Times Web site: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/21/technology/20101121-brain-interactive.html?ref=technology.

-   Prepare the Gallery Walk:

  • Most items are for display around the room (on chart paper or taped to the wall)--some items are images and others are quotes.
  • Post or place the items around the room in a way that will allow students to move freely and comfortably from one item to the next.
  • Item 2 is the multimedia feature from the New York Times Website, which can be cued up at a computer station, but will also need to be viewed as a whole class using a digital projector.

-   Review the Gallery Walk protocol (see Appendix).

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

(from Excerpt 3): socioeconomic, ubiquitous (section 2), encompass, interpersonal formats, infinitely scalable (section 3), predominant molecular currency, nucleus accumbens, commonality (section 4)

 

Materials

  • Analyzing the Evidence entry task (one per student)
  • Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" (one per student)
  • Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" text-dependent questions (one per student; one to display)
  • Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" Close Reading Guide (for teacher reference)
  • Document camera
  • Brain Development anchor chart--student version (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Brain Development anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Notices and Wonders note-catcher (begun in Lesson 1)                 
  • "Students and Technology: Constant Companions" (multimedia feature; http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/21/technology/20101121-brain-interactive.html?ref=technology)

(From The New York Times, November 20, 2010 (c) 2010 The New York Times. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of this Content without express written permission is prohibited.)

  • Digital projector
  • Gallery Walk items (from Lesson 1)
  • Thinking Log (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Homework: Excerpt 4 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Evidence Entry Task (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Analyzing the Evidence entry task. Ask students to complete it individually.
  • After a few minutes, ask students to raise their hand if they can identify the piece of evidence that does not support the main idea. Call on several students. Listen for them to identify the letter "d" as the piece that does not explain that neurons change according to task and environment.
  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets.

*   "I can identify text-based evidence that does or does not support the main idea of an informational text."

*   "I can read 'The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution' with support."

*   "I can analyze photos, video, and quotes to find a main idea."

  • Tell students the entry task asked them to weed out irrelevant evidence--that is, a quote that did not support the main idea. Ask students to write at the top of the entry task a number from 1 to 5. They should write a 1 if they were very confused and could not identify the piece of evidence that failed to support the main idea. They should write a 5 if they found the piece of evidence quickly and easily.
  • If time permits, ask a student who wrote a 5 to explain her thought process during the entry task. Alternatively, you could collect this entry task and use it to inform your teaching.
  • Explain that the text-dependent questions they will do next will help them read "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution."
  • Checking in with learning targets helps students self-assess their learning. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners most.

 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Reading of Excerpt 3  (18 minutes)

  • Distribute Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." Tell students that they will read this excerpt with support. Also distribute Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" text-dependent questions and display a copy on a document camera.
  • Work through this handout in concert with Excerpt 3 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" Close Reading Guide. (Be sure to save time for students to add to the anchor chart).
  • Invite students to retrieve their Brain Development anchor chart--student version and focus their attention on the class Brain Development anchor chart. Tell them that you would like to get this information onto the anchor chart. Do so, using the Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference) as needed. Consider writing something like this in the limbic system column:

-   "Dopamine is the main neurotransmitter in the limbic system" (Giedd)

-   "Dopamine flushes the limbic system during basic biological drives, by substance abuse, and addictive behaviors. It is also activated by video games." (Giedd)

  •  Ask students to turn and talk about what to write in the last column:

*   "Create 'if/then' statements from the information we learned about the video games, dopamine, and the limbic system."

  • After 1 minute, ask students to share out. Use the class discussion to add to the anchor chart and invite students to record the information on their own anchor charts. Consider writing something like this:

-   "If video games activate dopamine in the brain similarly to addictive behaviors, then a person may become addicted to video games in the same way someone can be addicted to behaviors."

  • Consider partnering ELL students who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

 

B. Revisit Gallery Walk (15 minutes)

  • Distribute students' filled-in Notices and Wonders note-catcher from Lesson 1.
  • Direct students' attention to the multimedia feature "Students and Technology: Constant Companions" cued up on the digital projector.
  • Explain that they will do one notice and wonder together before they work independently in the Gallery Walk. Tell students to notice how this relates to the ideas explored in their close reading today.
  • Play the audio under "A Shot of Energy: Ramon Ochoa Lopez." The audio is 1 minute, 28 seconds.
  • Give students a minute to write down their thoughts. Then cold call on students. Listen for them to say that the reason Ramon loves video games is the dopamine in his brain--the "shot of energy," as he calls it. But they know that dopamine is also one of the neurotransmitters that a person can get "addicted to." Perhaps they wonder if Ramon is addicted to video games. Remind students that the word "addiction" is defined in the Gallery Walk.
  • Tell students they will re-examine the Gallery Walk items from Lesson 1, including quotes, images, and the video. Some of the information will now seem familiar, but some might still be new and interesting; students should add anything they observe, or that is still new or interesting, in the Notices column. They also may still find some of the information surprising or may have additional questions that are not answered in the image or quote. They can add any questions in the Wonders column.
  • Review the Gallery Walk protocol as needed and get students in small groups with their note-catchers to begin.
  • Ask them to silently wander to each image, quote, or the video and write down what they notice and what they wonder for about 8 minutes. They may linger at any item and not worry about getting to all the items. Invite students to play multimedia feature from the New York Times Website at the computer station. They can revisit Ramon's audio or play any other student's audio. Remind students of the norms for moving calmly around the room and moving to the images, quotes, or video where there are fewer classmates.
  • Invite students to begin the Gallery Walk. Consider participating in this step and writing your own notices and wonders. Or circulate to listen in and clarify procedures as needed.
  • After 8 minutes, invite students to sit and finish writing their thoughts, especially adding to their thinking at the bottom of the note-catcher. Starting with notices, allow students to "popcorn" discuss any of the ideas they have written down. Next, invite them to "popcorn" discuss the questions that they still have after the Gallery Walk. Tell them that their questions may become research questions for Unit 2. Collect the Notices and Wonders note-catchers.
  • Congratulate students on how much they have learned about adolescent brain since Lesson 1. Point out specific learning that students didn't know in the first Gallery Walk but did know in the second, as well as deeper and/or different questions formed based on greater understanding of the adolescent brain.
  • Protocols such as a Gallery Walks are an engaging opportunity for students to reflect on their own learning. Developing reflection supports all students, but research shows it supports struggling learners most.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Thinking Log (7 minutes)

  • Ask students to retrieve their Thinking Logs. Then have them pair up and discuss this question before writing:

*   "How has revisiting the resources in the Gallery Walk clarified your thinking about adolescent brain development?"

  • Then have students respond in their Thinking Log (Lesson 7).
  • Time permitting, cold call students to share their current thinking.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Homework: Excerpt 4 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" and answer the questions. Use the scaffolding steps to help you.
  • Continue to read your independent reading book.

 

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