Mid-Unit Assessment: Development of the Young Brain | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U1:L5

Mid-Unit Assessment: Development of the Young Brain

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can compare and contrast different media versions of informational text. (RI. 7.7)
  • I can analyze impact of the techniques unique to each medium. (RI.7.7)
  • I can analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in different media and formats. (SL. 7.2)
  • I can explain how ideas presented in different media and formats clarify a topic, text or issue. (SL. 7.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the main idea and supporting ideas/details in "Development of the Young Brain."
  • I can compare the text and video of "Development of the Young Brain."
  • I can explain how the ideas presented in the video clarify my understanding of the adolescent brain.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Homework: Summarizing Main Idea and Supporting Details  (from Lesson 4)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment
  • Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details: Partner Practice

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Preliminary Viewing of Video (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Practicing with a Partner (15 minutes)

B.  Mid-Unit Assessment  (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  None

4.  Homework

A.  Complete the Homework: Summarize Your Learning. Also read Excerpt 1 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." Complete neurologist's notebook #5.

 

  • This lesson is the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, which centers on SL.7.2 and RI. 7.7. Students view a video and analyze the main idea and supporting details. Students are given an opportunity to practice with a partner before the assessment begins.
  • Note that students watch the same video "Development of the Young Brain" for both their practice and the assessment.

-   Clip 1 00-1:30: Practice with a partner (Work Time A)

-   Clip 2 1:30-3:34 to assess SL.7.2 (main idea in diverse media)

-   Clip 3 3:34-4:50 to assess RI.7.7 (comparing text to video)

  • The next half of Unit 1 moves on to how brain science relates to the digital revolution. Use the "Summarize Your Learning" assigned for Lesson 5 homework as a way to identify struggling students who may need some additional instruction to understand the basics of brain development. This is necessary foundational learning that they will need to be successful throughout the remainder of this unit as well as Units 2 and 3.
  • Also for homework, students read the first excerpt of "The Digital Revolution and Evolution of the Adolescent Mind." This text explores central questions of the module such as: How does the amount of time a teenager spends on screen change her brain? Can the brain adapt to the new digital environment? Will teenagers be able to learn vital social skills if they socialize increasingly online? Will the brain become so accustomed to artificially high levels of dopamine that the "real world" no longer holds its interest? Because this text grapples with these important questions while still being grounded in brain science, it is an important bridge between the texts about neuroscience in Unit 1 and the argument texts in Unit 2. (You may want to familiarize yourself with the entire text as it explores all the different facets of the issue of screen time and adolescent brain development. A link to the full text is provided in the Module Overview.)
    • "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" is a challenging text. Reading complex texts with the proper scaffolding can increase students' intellectual stamina. In the homework from this lesson they have an opportunity to grapple with this complex text in a highly supported manner. To decrease any anxiety that students may have, explain that tonight's homework will begin the second half of Unit 1 where they will learn more about the effects of digital media on the brain. This homework builds off of the ideas presented in the video today. The homework is a chance to challenge themselves to get the gist of a very difficult text. They should focus on getting the main idea and not worry about the details. Assure them that this homework is not part of an assessment and they will not be penalized for any wrong answers but you're confident they can find the main idea. Continue to reinforce that complex text needs to be read multiple times.
    • The overall grading system and the date of return of this assessment have been left to your discretion. The more quickly an assessment is returned, the more useful the feedback is to the students.
    • In advance:

    -   Prepare the materials for the assessment, including the projector and cuing up the video. You may find the video here: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/media/video/giedd.shtml.

    -   Determine pairs for Work Time A.

    • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

None

Materials

  • Video: "Development of the Young Brain" ( http://www.nimh.nih.gov/media/video/giedd.shtml.) (see Teaching Notes)
  • Digital projector
  • Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details: Partner Practice (one per student)
  • Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details: Partner Practice (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing "Development of the Young Brain" (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing "Development of the Young Brain" (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Homework: Summarize Your Learning (one per student)
  • Excerpt 1 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution" (one per student)
  • Neurologist's notebook #5 (one per student)
  • Neurologist's notebook #5 (answers, for teacher reference)

 

Opening

Opening

A. Preliminary Viewing of Video (5 minutes)

  • Collect the Homework: Summarizing Main Idea and Supporting Details from Lesson 4.
  • Ask a student to read today's learning targets:

*   "I can analyze the main idea and supporting details in 'Development of the Young Brain.'"

*   "I can compare the text and video of 'Development of the Young Brain.'"

*   "I can explain how the ideas presented in the video clarify my understanding of the adolescent brain."

  • Explain to students that today they will analyze the main idea and supporting details in a video. Instead of finding a main idea of the whole video, they will be assessed on their ability to find the main idea and supporting details on a specific clip from the video. Assure them that the process of finding the main idea is the same. To prepare, they will watch the entire 4:50 minutes of video once to get an overall sense of the gist.
  • Play the full video "Development of the Young Brain" one time through.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Practicing with a Partner (15 minutes)

  • Arrange students in pairs.
  • Distribute Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details: Partner Practice. Ask a student to read the directions aloud. Clarify as needed.
  • Play the first clip of the video, stopping at 1:30.
  • Instruct students to work in pairs to find the main idea and answer the questions.
  • After a few minutes, refocus the whole group. Play the video a second time, again stopping at 1:30.
  • Invite the students to amend their thinking from the first viewing.
  • Ask groups to share out. Answer any misunderstandings or confusion that surfaces.
  • Direct students to return to their seats.
  • Allowing students to discuss with a partner before writing or sharing with the whole class is a low-stress strategy to help them process in a risk-free situation.

 

B. Mid-Unit Assessment (25 minutes)

  • Tell students that the mid-unit assessment is about to begin. Explain that now they will work independently to find the main idea of a new clip from "Development of the Young Brain."
  • Distribute the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment:Analyzing "Development of the Young Brain." Instruct students to begin on Part I.
  • After a few minutes, play the second clip of video (from 1:30 to 3:34).
  • Give students a few minutes to begin filling out the chart.
  • After 3 minutes, play the second video clip again. Be sure to stop at 3:34.
  • Tell students to complete Part II and Part III.
  • After 5 minutes, refocus the whole class.
  • Ask students to read along silently as you read the transcript of the video found in Part IV of the assessment.
  • Then play the third video clip (starting at 3:34 and continuing to the end).
  • Play the third video clip one last time (starting at 3:34 and continuing to the end).
  • Instruct students to finish Parts IV and V.
  • As they complete the assessment, distribute Excerpt 1 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution,"neurologist's notebook #5, and Homework: Summarize Your Learning.
  • Students who finish early may move on to the homework.
  • You may wish to play the video more than twice, depending on the needs of your students.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

(None)

Homework

Homework
  • Complete the Homework: Summarize Your Learning. Also read Excerpt 1 of "The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution." Complete neurologist's notebook #5.

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