Analyzing the Main Idea in Video: Understanding the Limbic System | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M4A:U1:L4

Analyzing the Main Idea in Video: Understanding the Limbic System

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in different media and formats. (SL.7.2)
  • I can explain how ideas presented in different media and formats clarify a topic, text, or issue. (SL.7.2)
  • I can analyze impact of the techniques unique to each medium. (RI.7.7)
  • I can adjust my writing practices for different timeframes, tasks, purposes, and audiences. (W.7.10)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the main ideas and supporting idea/details in "Insight into the Teenage Brain."
  • I can explain how the different aspects of a presentation contribute to my understanding.
  • I can explain how ideas presented in "Insight into the Teenage Brain" clarify my understanding of the brain.
  • I can summarize the main idea and supporting details in a well-explained paragraph.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Thinking Logs

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Entry Task: Thinking Log (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Analyzing Main Idea in Video (33 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Exit Ticket: Thinking Log (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Using your neurologist's notebook as a resource, complete the Homework: Summarizing Main Idea and Supporting Details.

  • This lesson focuses on SL.7.2, a standard that students have not worked with in other modules. Although analyzing the main idea and supporting details is not a new skill, applying it to the video they watch in this lesson adds a new dimension. Students' familiarity with the neurologist notebook will help them with their work on this new standard because it is structurally the same as the Main Ideas and Supporting Details note-catcher, which they use in this lesson (applied to video).
  • Play the video all the way through once before you begin analyzing the main idea and supporting details. This will be particularly important for your ELL and struggling students.
  • Building off Lesson 3, students will continue to do some RI.7.7 work and think about how images influence their understanding of text.
  • In addition to explaining more about the limbic system, the video in this lesson helps to balance the information the students have learned about the brain. Many of the articles they have read so far focus on the negative aspects of the adolescent brain (impulsive, risk-taking, unable to make wise decisions in an emotionally charged situation, etc.). Today's lesson emphasizes the positive. As Dr. Galvan says, the teen brain, with its built-in desire to seek out risks and rewards, is perfectly suited to the central task of adolescence--breaking away from caregivers.
  • Review Work Time A carefully to envision students' work with the text and video, and consider how to manage the logistics smoothly.
  • Students add to their Thinking Logs for both the entry ticket and exit ticket. Be sure those are accessible.
  • For homework, students will return to their neurologist's notebooks and write a summary. To give them more options to work from, do not collect neurologist's notebook #4 (their homework from the previous lesson) and be sure to return any entries you collected in Lessons 2 or 3. The purpose of this homework is twofold: First, it will help students review the complex information on brain development they have learned so far; second, it will help them grapple with main ideas and supporting details before they are assessed on this skill in the mid-unit assessment in the next lesson.
  • Look ahead to the mid-unit assessment in the next lesson and prepare any necessary materials.
  • In advance:

-   Preview the video and try filling in the note-catcher yourself. This will make the discussion in Work Time A more productive.

-   Review the Insight into the Teen Brain Teaching Guide, which you will use to guide students through Work Time A. 

-   Ready the video: http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Insight-Into-the-Teenage-Brain;search%3Atag%3A%22tedxyouth-caltech%22.

(Galvan, Adriana. "Insight Into the Teenage Brain." February 13, 2013. Online video. TEDxhttp://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Insight-Into-the-Teenage-Brain;search%3Ateenage%20brain%20adriana%20g.)

  • Post: Learning targets, entry task.

Vocabulary

dopamine, striatum

Materials

  • Thinking Logs (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Model Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Brain Development anchor chart--student version (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Document camera
  • Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details in Video note-catcher (one per student and one for display)
  • "Insight into the Teenage Brain" TedX Talk featuring Dr. Adriana Galvan (video; http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Insight-Into-the-Teenage-Brain;search%3Atag%3A%22tedxyouth-caltech%22)
  • Technology to display video
  • "Insight into the Teen Brain" Teaching Guide (for teacher reference)
  • Model Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details in Video note-catcher (for teacher reference)
  • Comparing Text to Video (one to display)
  • Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Brain Development anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Homework: Summarizing Main Idea and Supporting Details (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Entry Task (5 minutes)

  • Post the entry task in advance:

*   "Please retrieve your Thinking Logs and fill out the entry under Lesson 4, "What You Should Know about Your Brain."

  • After students have completed the task, cold call several of them to share their thinking about the questions:

*   "Dr. Willis says that when you stimulate neuron pathways over and over again, they become stronger. As she says, 'Practice makes permanent.' What implications does this have for the kinds of activities that teens do repeatedly?"

*   "What else are you wondering about the adolescent brain's development?"

  • Be sure that students understand that while the brain shapes behavior, behavior can shape the brain. This will likely be a major premise on which they build their position paper in Unit 3. If need be, pull quotes from their previous reading to review this information.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Main Idea in Video (33 minutes)

  • Refer the class to the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart.  Add dopamine to the chart and ask a student to use his or her reading from last night to define it, referring to Model Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart (for teacher reference) as needed.
  • Next, ask students to refer to their Brain Development anchor chart--student version. Ask a student to reread all the information in the "limbic system" column. Explain that the video the class will watch today will be talking a lot about the striatum, which is part of the limbic system.
  • Distribute and use a document camera to display the Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details in Video note-catcher. Point out that this note-catcher is nearly identical to the neurologist's notebook. Students have had lots of practice with main idea and supporting idea/details.
  • Ask a student to read the learning targets. Then ask:

*   "How will analyzing the main idea in a video be different from a text?"

  • Listen for students to say things like: "It will be harder because you won't be able to reread" or "It will be easier because it's easier to listen to someone talk."
  • Ask:

*   "How will analyzing the main idea in a video be the same?"

  • Listen for students to understand that in both text and video the main idea must be a big, general summary statement, and it might not be apparent after just one read or watch.
  • Clarify for students that you will be playing the video several times and that this first time they should watch for "the gist."
  • Play "Insight into the Teenage Brain" TedX Talk featuring Dr. Adriana Galvan all the way through once. (This will take 10 minutes).
  • Invite students to turn and talk and try to identify what the main idea is. Because this is likely to change, they should write their idea in the margin of their note-catcher.
  • Tell students that the class will now watch the video again. You will periodically pause the video so that students can add to the note-catcher.
  • Begin showing the video again. Use the "Insight into the Teen Brain" Teaching Guide for suggested pause points and prompts. Refer to the Model Analyzing the Main Idea and Supporting Details in Video note-catcher (for teacher reference) as needed to support students with their note-catchers.
  • Halfway through the video, display Comparing Text to Video. This will help students compare a text to the video version of the text (RI 7.7,) and build off the work they did in Lesson 3, Use this as the text version of the video and lead a brief discussion to compare the text version to the video version.
  • At the conclusion of the video, ask the students to identify two pieces of information to add to their Brain Development anchor chart. See Model Brain Development anchor chart (for teacher reference) for suggestions, but be sure that the class Brain Development anchor chart reflects the class discussion as well. As students fill in information on their own copy of the anchor chart, fill in the class anchor chart.
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.
  • If possible, give English Language Learners an opportunity to preview the video before the lesson, as a "first view" for gist.

 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to return to their Thinking Logs and complete the exit ticket entry in Lesson 4.

-   What did Dr. Galvan's experiments prove about how teens react differently to dopamine levels than adults or children? How might this explain teen behavior?

-   What else are you wondering about the adolescent brain's development?

  • If time permits, invite students to share out their thinking. Alternatively, this may be a good point at which to collect students' thinking for a formative assessment.
  • Distribute Homework: Summarizing Main Idea and Supporting Details. Clarify any questions.

Homework

Homework
  • The Mid-Unit 1 Assessment will be tomorrow. You will analyze the main idea and supporting details in a video. To help you practice, return to your neurologist's notebook entries and summarize one of the articles that you have read on the Homework: Summarizing Main Idea and Supporting Details.

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