Citing Evidence: The Ending of Pygmalion | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M2B:U2:L10

Citing Evidence: The Ending of Pygmalion

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can analyze the interaction of literary elements of a story or drama. (RL.7.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite evidence from the play Pygmalion to predict the ending of the play.
  • I can analyze how plot, character, and setting interact in Pygmalion.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 8 (from homework)
  • Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 8
  • Super Speed Quote Sandwich
  • Eliza Character Tracker

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Unpacking Learning Targets/Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 8 (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Close Read: Section 9 (15 minutes)

     B.  Readers Theater: Section 9 (1o minutes)

     C.  Revisit Eliza Character Tracker (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Super Speed Quote Sandwich: Predicting the End of the Play (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Finish the Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 9 and complete 20 minutes of independent reading.

  • In this lesson, students reach the end of Act V of Pygmalion, which is the end of the dialogue of the play. In 1916, George Bernard Shaw was "sufficiently irritated" with audiences and pundits who wanted Eliza and Higgins to get married that he added a postscript essay, "What Happened Afterwards." Students will read a modified version of this essay as part of the play script in Lesson 11.
  • Students conduct the now familiar routines of the Checking for Understanding entry task, close reading, Readers Theater, Eliza Character Tracker, and Reader's Notes in this lesson.
  • Use your judgment as to whether your students will need more time in Work Time C. Trackers should take priority over Readers Theater, if necessary.
  • The Closing adds an engaging "quote sandwich" practice activity, the purpose of which is twofold: It challenges students to create the most effective quote sandwich they can in the shortest time possible, for both engagement and for mental challenge, and it asks the students to make a prediction about the material in Shaw's postscript essay. Consider reviewing the parts of a quote sandwich if necessary.
  • Use your review of the students' quote sandwich in the Reader's Notes for Lesson 9 to determine which students may need extra support for the quote sandwich format in this lesson.
  • In advance:

-   Determine how you are going to assign parts for Readers Theater: Eliza, Higgins.

-   Set up props, costumes, and/or a performance space for the Readers Theater if you choose.

-   Print larger copies of page 66 for use during the Readers Theater.

  • Review:

-   Close Reading Guide: Pygmalion, Section 9 (answers, for teacher reference)

-   Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 9

-   Original Postscript: Pygmalion, pages 89-100. Bear in mind that this is an extraordinarily long and detailed essay that Shaw wrote several years after the play was first performed. Review it to give yourself some context as to whether student predictions are on or off the mark, but do not give away any details to students yet.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

composedly, averted, recoil, infatuated, impudent, consort battleship, incorrigible, disdainfully

Materials

  • Pygmalion (play; one per student
  • Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 8 (one per student)
  • Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 8 (answer, for teacher reference)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pygmalion, Section 9 (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Close Reading Guide: Pygmalion, Section 9 (for teacher reference)
  • Large-print/enlarged copies of Pygmalion Readers Theater excerpt: pages 87 and 88 (from Eliza: "Oh, you are a cruel tyrant" to Higgins: "Of course I do, you little fool") (one per student)
  • Eliza Character Trackers (from Lesson 3)
  • Super Speed Quote Sandwich handout (one per student)
  • Diversity Discussion Appointment handouts (from Unit 1, Lesson 4)
  • Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 9 (one per student)
  • Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 9 (answers, for teacher reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets/Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 9 (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 8 to students as they enter.
  • Direct students to complete the task individually, and to use their text Pygmalion if they wish. As they do so, circulate to check the Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 8 for completion.
  • When students are done, call on several to share their answers to the entry task. Refer to the Checking for Understanding Entry Task: Pygmalion, Section 8 (answer, for teacher reference) for a possible response. Confirm that Eliza has learned from Pickering that self-respect can be rooted in the respect with which one is treated.
  • Have students get out their homework; post definitions for the Reader's Dictionary and prompt them to revise their Reader's Dictionaries as necessary.
  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets:

*   "I can cite evidence from the play Pygmalion to predict the ending of the play."

*   "I can analyze how plot, character, and setting interact in Pygmalion."

  • Ask students to discuss with a partner their initial feelings about what might happen at the end of the play. Ask them to bear these in mind as they read through Act V.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Close Read: Section 9 (15 minutes)

  • Have students get out their Diversity Discussion Appointment handout and meet with their Yellow Hands appointment.
  • Distribute the Text-Dependent Questions: Pygmalion, Section 9 and display a copy using a document camera.
  • Use the Close Reading Guide: Pygmalion, Section 9 to guide students through the series of text-dependent questions related to Section 9.

B. Readers Theater: Section 9 (1o minutes)

  • Distribute the large-print/enlarged copies of Pygmalion Readers Theater excerpt: pages 87 and 88.
  • Have students review their answers to Question 6 in the text-dependent questions for a strong connection between the performance of the play and their analysis.
  • Have the students perform the Pygmalion Readers Theater excerpt according to your previous arrangements and preferences.
  • Reinforce the connection between comprehending the play and performing the play by reflecting on the performance out loud after it is complete.

C. Revisit Eliza Character Tracker (10 minutes)

  • Have students get out their Eliza Character Tracker.
  • Direct them to look over Act V and independently fill in any evidence they find on internal and external characteristics of Eliza. Encourage them to use any of their text-dependent questions to assist them.
  • Consider modeling an entry if students need extra assistance in determining evidence.
  • Circulate and offer assistance as needed.
  • About halfway through the work time, debrief out loud with students. Make sure that in particular, Eliza's triumph of confidence, agency, and independence is documented. There are multiple forms of evidence for this in Act V, and students may choose a variety of them to document on their tracker. Examples might include:

-   Determining to marry Freddy (87)

-   Not doing Higgins's errands (89)

-   Threatening to become a phonetics teacher (88)

  • Ask students to which learning target this work applies. Listen for: "I can analyze how plot, character, and setting interact in Pygmalion."

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Super Speed Quote Sandwich: Predicting the End of the Play (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Super Speed Quote Sandwich handout. Tell students that they will conclude their lesson today by participating in a timed "speed trial."
  • Let them know that there is one more piece of the play to be read: a sequel, in the form of an essay, in which George Bernard Shaw discusses what happens to the characters after the lines are finished. Reassure students that they will be reading an adapted version of this essay (they may have looked ahead to see how detailed it is), and its contents might be very surprising to them.
  • Ask students to recall their initial prediction about the conclusion of the play from the Opening and take a minute or two to solidify their thoughts, either silently or with a partner.
  • Invite students to complete the Super Speed Quote Sandwich handout, using a quote from any part of the play that they feel supports their prediction. The goal is to complete the handout before time is called.
  • Time them strictly, with a "ready ... set ... go!" launch, and end the activity after 2 or 3 minutes.
  • Students will revisit their predictions in Lesson 11, the last lesson for reading the play Pygmalion.
  • Hand out the Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 9.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish the Reader's Notes: Pygmalion, Section 9 and complete 20 minutes of independent reading.

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