Performance Task: Publishing the Final Brochure | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M2A:U3:L9

Performance Task: Publishing the Final Brochure

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.7.2)
  • I can use technology to produce and publish a piece of writing with links to cited sources. (W.7.6)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.7.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can design a brochure in which the layout, style, and language make my meaning clear and engage a teenage audience.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Final version of performance task

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

A.  Mini Lesson: What Makes a Layout Effective? (10 minutes)

2.   Work Time

A.  Completing Final Draft of Brochure (30 minutes)

3.   Closing and Assessment

A.  Turn and Talk (5 minutes)

4.   Homework

A.  Continue reading in your independent reading book for this unit. Remember that in Lesson 10, we will be writing book reviews.  Most of you need to be finished with your book by then;  a few of you who selected longer books have set a different goal with me.  Please make sure that you have met your reading goal and bring your book to class that day.

  • In this lesson, students work on finalizing their brochures. This lesson runs as a workshop lesson: It begins with a mini lesson, continues with a large chunk of work time, and concludes with a debrief. For work time, consider both how you will spend your time and how you will support students in using this time well. You might confer with each pair, pull several pairs to support more intensively, or provide a formal checkpoint for each pair. Students might benefit from a routine in which you ask partners to commit to a goal for the next 15 minutes, then check in to see if they have reached that goal, then set the next goal.
  • Consider how you will structure the entry task and mini lesson to support students use of technology to create their brochures (see Opening A in the lesson plan). This portion of the lesson will vary a great deal depending on which (if any) technology you are using. Remember that this performance task is designed to give students an authentic audience for their research. The synthesis of that research is the most important part of the brochure, not the layout or genre of brochures.
  • Consider inviting the technology specialist in your school to assist or to plan this lesson with you.
  • If students are working with a technology platform that is new to them, consider providing a resource to help them other than just asking you questions individually, as there is no way one adult can field that many questions in a single class period. For example, consider creating an online user's guide or a handout with common functions and questions. Remind students that they need to use all of their resources during work time before asking you for help.
  • In advance: Plan the mini lesson and support for any new technology students will use.

Vocabulary

graphic design

Materials

  • Model Performance Task: "iCare about the iPhone" (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Entry Task (one per student; teacher-created; see Teaching Note above)
  • Brochure Planning Guide (from Lesson 8; one per pair)
  • Directions for using technology (from Lesson 8; optional; teacher-created)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: What Makes a Layout Effective? (10 minutes)

  • Post the model performance task where all students can see it.
  • Post the Entry Task (Tailor this to suit the needs of the platform students will work with):

*   "How did the author use layout and graphic design to get your attention and communicate clearly? What do you notice (about the use of headings, color, graphics, and the placement of text and objects)?"

  • Briefly define layout and graphic design, and remind students that just as using language appropriate to their task will help their audience understand their ideas, the way they lay out and design their brochure will also very much affect how the audience engages with and understands their work.
  • Direct students to complete the entry task on a piece of paper.
  • Then ask a number of students to share what is effective in the model. Prompt them: "How does that get the reader's attention? How does it make the meaning clear?" Middle school students can get caught up in the tricks and frills of a technology; it is important that they understand that the technology is a tool used to engage and communicate with your audience, not something that has value just because it "looks cool."
  • If appropriate, share with students how to use this technology, and in particular how to make it do the things they noticed were effective in the model.
  • Discussing a model provides a clear vision of the expectation for students.

 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Completing Final Draft of Brochure (30 minutes)

  • Direct students to work in pairs (from Lesson 8) and to use their Brochure Planning Guide. They should focus on completing a final draft of their brochure.
  • Consider how you might confer strategically with groups at a particular checkpoint (this will vary depending on technology), or pull several pairs for additional support.
  • Consider supporting pairs in setting goals for 15-minute periods, and checking in with them at the end of that time to see if they met that goal and set another goal for the following 15 minutes.
  • As you circulate, look for examples of students who are making strong decisions about their work, to share during the debrief (below).
  • Some students may have strengths in art or technology. Consider using them as "teacher assistants" during work time.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Turn and Talk (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn and talk with a partner:

*   "What is one layout decision you made that has worked out really well? How does it help you engage and communicate with your audience?"

  • Call on several pairs (it's best if you select strong work in advance) to share their decisions with the class.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading in your independent reading book for this unit. Remember that in Lesson 10, we will be writing book reviews.  Most of you need to be finished with your book by then; a few of you who selected longer books have set a different goal with me.  Please make sure that you have met your reading goal and bring your book to class that day.

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