Speech Structure: Part 2 of the Commonwealth Club Address | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M2A:U2:L6

Speech Structure: Part 2 of the Commonwealth Club Address

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze the organization of an informational text (including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas). (RI.7.5)
  • I can analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. (RI.7.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of Chavez's speech and explain how each section contributes to his central claim.
  • I can find examples in the story of the UFW of how the government and workers can affect working conditions.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Commonwealth Speech Structure anchor chart
  • Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 16-21

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Entry Task (8 minutes)

2.   Work Time

A.  Adding to Commonwealth Club Address Structure Anchor Chart for Paragraphs 16-21 (20 minutes)

B.  Adding to Agents of Change Anchor Chart (10 minutes)

3.   Closing and Assessment

A. Returning Assessment and Reviewing Homework (7 minutes)

4.   Homework

A. Correct your Mid-Unit 2 Assessment

B. Complete the Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 23-26.

  • In this lesson, students focus on Paragraphs 16-21. They analyze how this section of the speech contributes to Cesar Chavez's central claim. In order to hold their thinking about this question, they continue to work with the Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart that was introduced in Lesson 2. As before, keep this as a class anchor chart and have students take notes on their own copies.
  • Students also add to the Agents of Change anchor chart, reflecting on what they have learned from the Chavez speech about how the government and consumers can affect working conditions.
  • Homework provides students with an opportunity to practice the skill that will be on the End of Unit 2 Assessment: identifying the main claim of a section and considering how it relates to the speech as a whole. This should be used only as formative assessment data.
  • Students also correct the returned Mid Unit 2 Assessment for homework. Revising work and explaining their thinking helps students improve their textual analysis skills.
  • Review Commonwealth Club Address, Paragraphs 16 - 26. Read the Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 16 - 21 and for Paragraphs 23 - 26 and consider what answers you hope to see students write. (Since these text-dependent questions are relatively concrete, this lesson does not include a teacher guide for answers to the text-dependent questions. Use the answers those provided in earlier lessons as a model as you consider what a strong student answer would entail).
  • In advance: Be prepared to return students' Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, with wrong answers marked. Do not provide correct answers. Students correct their own Mid-Unit 2 Assessment as a part of their Lesson 6 homework.
  • Post: learning targets.

Vocabulary

structure, contribute, central claim; boycott, dismantled, disposable, reap, wanton, subsidies, subjugated

 

Materials

  • Working Conditions Timeline strips (one per pair of students)
  • Document camera
  • Working Conditions Timeline (for teacher reference)
  • Text of Commonwealth Club Address by Cesar Chavez (students' annotated copies from Lessons 2-5)
  • Weaving Room Discussion Appointments handout (from Unit 1, Lesson 3)
  • Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 16-21 (one per student)
  • Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart (one to post and a copy for each student; from Lesson 2)
  • Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart--teacher edition (from Lesson 2)
  • Agents of Change anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessments with wrong answers marked by teacher
  • Homework: Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 23-26 (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Entry Task (8 minutes)

  •  Tell students that today they will be thinking about how the government can affect working conditions by passing laws. Distribute Working Conditions Timeline strips to each pair of students. Ask students to read the strips and use their background knowledge to try to put them in chronological order. Let them know that it's OK if they don't know; they should just try their best.
  • Using a document camera, display another set of Working Conditions Timeline strips. Cold call on pairs to share what order they put the strips in. Ask students to explain why they put the events in the order they did. Don't spend too long on this; pairs likely ordered the strips very differently; the focus is on their ability to explain their reasoning, not on getting the class to agree on a "right" order.
  • Display the Working Conditions Timeline (for teacher reference) and ask students to compare their order with the timeline. Ask them to raise their hand if anything surprises them. Call on several students to share what surprises them and why.
  • Show students where on the timeline Lyddie was and where Chavez is. Ask:

*   "What important laws did the government pass that affected working conditions after Lyddie and before Chavez?"

*   "What laws have been passed since Chavez started the UFW?"

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Adding to the Commonwealth Club Address Structure Anchor Chart for Paragraphs 16-21 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets for today. For each target, read the target and tell students, "On the count of three, point to the anchor chart where you think we will record our ideas about this target." Watch for students to indicate that ideas about text structure will go on Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart and ideas about how workers and the government change working conditions will go on the Agents of Change anchor chart.
  • Ask students to take their Text of Commonwealth Club Address by Cesar Chavez (students' annotated copies from Lessons 2-5) and move to sit with a partner on their Weaving Room Discussion Appointments handout (from Unit 1; you decide which appointment to use).
  • Display and distribute the Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 16-21. Direct students to work with their partners to answer these questions, again in the left-hand margin of the text.
  • When most pairs are done, refocus whole group and debrief.
  • Tell students that now they will add to the Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart. Direct them to get out their individual copies of this chart. Help them notice that the first two sections of the speech explain life before the UFW and then how the UFW helped workers. At this point in the speech, Chavez shifts from looking backward to looking ahead.
  • Ask students to read the first sentence of Paragraph 16: "Two major trends give us hope and encouragement." Ask:

*   "What does this tell you about how the rest of the speech might be organized?"

  • Listen for students to notice that Chavez will explain two reasons the union will continue to be strong. Acknowledge that students probably noticed as they did gist notes that these two trends are not dealt with one at a time in the rest of the speech.
  • Tell them, however, that Paragraphs 16-21 deal with one trend. Ask them to reread the section carefully and work with their partner to figure out what the main claim of this section is and how it relates to the central claim of the speech. Remind students that one way to figure this out is to notice the major topic of each paragraph; their statement should be a synthesis of the paragraphs, not just an idea drawn from one.
  • Debrief using the Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart--teacher edition for guidance; prompt students to revise their individual copies of the anchor chart as necessary.
  • The most important part of Work Time Part A is the last part--adding to the Commonwealth Club Address Structure anchor chart. Make sure to finish the debrief of the text-dependent questions early enough to give students time to grapple with this (at least 10 minutes, including the debrief).
  • Adding visuals or graphics to anchor charts can help students remember or understand key ideas or directions.

 

B. Adding to Agents of Change anchor chart (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they will add to the Agents of Change anchor chart, particularly for government and consumers.
  • Think-Pair-Share:

*   "In Paragraph 18, Chavez talks about how action by the government made working conditions worse. What government action made working conditions worse? What would Chavez say the government should do to improve working conditions?"

  • Make sure students have inferred that Chavez is criticizing the government not for failing to pass laws but failing to enforce a law that was passed.
  • Model: "So I am going to add to my anchor chart under Government: 'Can improve working conditions by enforcing labor laws that protect workers.'"
  • Ask students to work with their partners to write down one more thing the government can do to improve working conditions (they should think about the entry task; consider posting the timeline) and one thing Chavez says consumers can do.
  • After students have worked for 5 minutes, lead a short debrief and add ideas to the class anchor chart. Make sure students add:

*   Government can pass laws that set working hours and minimum wages, make working conditions safe, and protect the right to unionize.

*   Consumers can boycott companies that do not treat workers fairly.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Returning Assessment and Reviewing Homework (7 minutes)

  • Return students' Mid-Unit 2 Assessments, with wrong answers indicated but not corrected.
  • Tell students that part of their homework for tonight is to correct their assessments, which should be easier now that they have closely read and discussed that passage of the speech. For answers they got wrong, they should circle the correct answer and also add a note explaining why it is the correct answer.
  • Distribute the Homework: Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 23-26. Explain to students that for homework, they will practice the skill of identifying the main claim of a section and considering how that section helps develop the central claim of the speech.

Homework

Homework
  • Correct your Mid Unit 2 Assessment.
  • Complete the Text-Dependent Questions for Paragraphs 23 - 26.

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