Generating Reasons: Should Lyddie Sign the Petition? | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M2A:U1:L12

Generating Reasons: Should Lyddie Sign the Petition?

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can analyze the interaction of literary elements of a story or drama. (RL.7.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words or phrases. (L.7.4)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about seventh-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.7.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can synthesize textual evidence into reasons about why Lyddie should or should not sign the petition.
  • By engaging in a discussion with my partner, I can analyze one section of Lyddie in order to deepen my understanding of Lyddie's decision.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Checking for Understanding, Chapter 17 entry task

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Entry Task: Checking for Understanding (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A. Forming Evidence-Based Claims: Lyddie's Decision (10 minutes)

B. Generating Reasons For and Against Signing the Petition (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Turn and Talk: Connecting Reasons to Evidence Practice (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Chapters 18-19 of Lyddie and complete Reader's Notes for Chapters 18 and 19. This is due in Lesson 14. 

  • In this lesson, students reread the final passage listed on Lyddie's Decision: Passages to Reread chart. Once more, they gather and analyze selected passage carefully to gather and analyze textual evidence about why Lyddie should or should not sign the petition. They add the textual evidence they find to the Odell Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers (one for and one against signing the petition).
  • Students then synthesize the evidence they have gathered to create reasons that Lyddie should sign the petition and reasons she shouldn't. This is a critical step in crafting their arguments. The Lyddie's Decision anchor chart will serve as a place to hold the class's thinking about the reasons.
  • At this point, students have rotated through all of the appointments on their Weaving Room Discussion Appointments handout. From this lesson on, select the appointment, making sure to vary it so that students have the opportunity to meet with a variety of their classmates.
  • If students have Reader's Notes in packets, collect the packet for Chapters 8-17 today to informally assess; then distribute the final packet for Chapters 18-23.
  • Review students' Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers to see which students may need additional support today.
  • In advance: Decide which Discussion Appointment to use today.
  • Review: Lyddie, pp. 138 - 140 (final passage from Lyddie's Decision: Passages to Reread chart)

Vocabulary

reason; despised (131), obliged (131), monstrous (132), plaits (134), ignorant (135), skeptical (136)

Materials

  • Checking for Understanding, Chapter 17 entry task (one per student)
  • Forming Evidence-based Claims graphic organizers (begun in Lesson 10; collected at the end of Lesson 11 for teacher feedback)
  • Weaving Room Discussion Appointments handout (from Lesson 3)
  • Lyddie's Decision: Passages to Reread chart (one to display, from Lesson 10)
  • Lyddie (book; one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Lyddie's Decision anchor chart (from Lesson 10)
  • Turn and Talk: Connecting Reasons to Evidence Practice (one per student)
  • Lyddie Reader's Notes, Chapter 18 and Chapter 19 (two separate supporting materials; one each per student)
  • Lyddie Reader's Notes, Chapter 18 and Chapter 19 (two separate supporting materials; for Teacher Reference)

Opening

Opening

A. Forming Evidence-Based Claims: Lyddie's Decision (10 minutes)

  • Distribute Checking for Understanding, Chapter 17 Entry Task to students as they enter.
  • Direct students to complete the entry task individually. As they do so, circulate to check the Reader's Notes (Chapter 17) for completion.
  • When students are done, call on several students to share their answers to the entry task.
  • Post the correct definitions of the words in the Reader's Dictionary and prompt students to correct their Reader's Notes as necessary. Ask students if there are words about which they are confused, and clarify as necessary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Forming Evidence-Based Claims: Lyddie's Decision (10 minutes)

  • Return students' Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers from Lesson 11 and give any whole class feedback. Tell students that today, they will analyze one more excerpt to gather textual evidence.
  • Direct students to move to the next appointment on the Weaving Room Discussion Appointment sheet and direct their attention to Lyddie's Decision: Passages to Reread chart. Tell them that today, they will focus on the last excerpt listed on this chart and direct them to find those pages in Lyddie.
  • Remind students of their work in Lesson 11. They should follow a similar protocol in this work time: They should partner read the excerpt before they try to find evidence from it to add to their Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers. Remind them that with partner reading:
  1. Partner A reads out loud for a few paragraphs.
  2. Partner B states the gist of those paragraphs.
  3. The two partners switch: For the next few paragraphs, Partner B reads out loud and Partner A states the gist.
  4. After partner reading the excerpt, add evidence to both Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers.
  • As students work, circulate to listen in and probe. Prompt students to notice that a single excerpt may include both textual evidence in favor of signing the petition and textual evidence against signing it. 
  • Near the end of work time, debrief as a class, making sure to script the answers on a copy of the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer and to discuss the following quote: "She woke in the night, puzzled. She thought she had heard Betsy again--that wretched hacking sound that sawed through her rib cage straight into her heart. And then she was wide awake and knew it to be Rachel" (139).
  • Consider posting the directions for partners to follow as they work.
  • Consider highlighting the most relevant sections of text for your most struggling readers.
  • Consider working with a small group of students whose work in Lesson 11 suggested they could benefit from extra support.

B. Generating Reasons For and Against Signing the Petition (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have gathered some textual evidence, they are ready to start listing the reasons Lyddie should or should not sign the petition. Encourage them to look at their graphic organizers and think about the major reasons for and against that their evidence suggests.
  • Consider modeling this. For example, you might focus on the quote from page 98 that the debrief in Lesson 11 included: "She was too tired now at night to copy out a page of Oliver to paste to her loom. It hardly mattered. When would she have had time to study it?" (98) This was probably entered on the "Lyddie should sign the petition" graphic organizer.
  • If the class has other pieces of evidence that refer to how hard the mill girls worked, your explanation might sound something like this: "As I look over the evidence and my explanations of it, I can see that this piece of evidence is related to a few others about how hard the girls were working. I can combine these pieces of evidence and come up with a reason: Lyddie should sign the petition because the work is incredibly difficult and makes her so tired that she cannot even enjoy her life. I am going to write this in the last row of the graphic organizer where it says 'Reasons to support claim,' which is where I will list reasons for why Lyddie should or should not sign the petition. Some of the reasons I write may be supported by only one piece of evidence; some reasons I write may draw on several pieces of evidence."
  • Direct students to work with their partners to add reasons to the bottom row of the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers. Circulate as students work and prompt them to connect their reasons to specific textual evidence.
  • Finally, refocus whole class and direct students' attention to the Lyddie's Decision anchor chart. Call on students to share their reasons, asking each person to explain the piece of textual evidence that connects to that reason. List the reasons on the anchor chart. Listen for students to say:
    • Reasons for: work has speeded up and the workers are exhausted, they work long hours, the workers get terrible coughs, they get injured, the system is unjust, Rachel is sick
    • Reasons against: Lyddie needs money for the farm/her family, Lyddie is supporting Rachel, Lyddie will be blacklisted if she signs, Lyddie may earn less money if hours are shorter
  • Give students specific positive feedback about their careful thinking about evidence. Tell them that the process they just used--gathering evidence, thinking about it, relating it to the question, synthesizing it--is an essential part of forming a claim. Strong readers and writers do just this. They don't jump right to a claim, but really think carefully about all of the evidence before deciding what they will argue.
  • Collect the completed Forming Evidence-Based Claims to check for student understanding. Also collect Reader's Notes, Chapters 8-17 to informally assess them.
  • Be prepared to run this as a whole class activity if students are struggling to generate reasons in pairs. It is critical that students have a clear list of reasons to draw on when they start to plan their essays. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Turn and Talk: Connecting Reasons to Evidence Practice (10 minutes)

  • Distribute and/or display the Turn and Talk: Connecting Reasons to Evidence Practice. Tell students that they are going to practice saying out loud an argument that they could make in their essay. Make sure they understand that they are using the handout as a guide for talking; they do not need to write anything down right now. Give them a few minutes to think.
  • Then prompt them to turn and talk with their seat partner to share their statement. Circulate to listen in, and share several particularly strong examples with the class.
  • Remind students that the next reading assignment (Chapters 18 and 19) is due in Lesson 14. Distribute new Reader's Notes packet.
  • Collect the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers and use them to determine which students might need additional support in the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapters 18-19 of Lyddie and complete Reader's Notes for Chapters 18 and 19. This is due in Lesson 14.

Note: Review students' Forming Evidence Based Claims graphic organizers for understanding. There is time in Lesson 13 to work with a small group if needed. 

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