Inferring about Character: World Café to Analyze and Discuss Points of View (Chapters 1–5) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M1:U1:L9

Inferring about Character: World Café to Analyze and Discuss Points of View (Chapters 1–5)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters in a literary text. (RL.7.6)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about seventh-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.7.1)
  • I can select evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.7.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva.
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with my classmates about our reading.
  • I can select ideas from my notes to support my analysis of the characters Nya and Salva.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Written Self-Reflection
  • World Cafe charts
  • Pre-writing Ideas

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening 

A. Written Self-reflection (5 minutes)

B. Introducing Learning Targets and  Gathering Notes (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A. World Cafe Discussion Protocol (20 minutes)

B. Planning for Writing: Selecting Ideas (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Revisit Learning Targets (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A. Continue reading your independent reading book for this unit at home.

  • In this lesson, students do not read a new chapter of the novel. Instead, they synthesize their learning from Chapters 1-5, focusing on their current understanding of the characters Nya and Salva. This prepares them for a shift in focus to informational text in Lessons 10-14. Students know that Salva is from the Dinka tribe and Nya is from the Nuer tribe and that these two tribes have a history of violence in the midst of the Sudanese Civil War. Lesson 9 thus helps create a "need to know" the content knowledge they will encounter through informational texts in Lessons 10-14. 
  • Students are not introduced to new vocabulary in this lesson. Consider posting a list of all words from Lesson Vocabulary for Lessons 1-7 where students can view it. Reinforce students' use of key vocabulary, particularly as it relates to the guiding question. 
  • Students synthesize their discussions from the World Cafe with a prompt to generate ideas for the pre-writing process. In Lessons 10-13, students will continue to practice writing, adding a layer of writing with evidence. In Lesson 14, they write a more extended response during their End of Unit assessment. This will launch students into more focused writing instruction in Unit 2.
  • Review World Cafe  protocol (Appendix 1; also embedded in the body of work time of this lesson).
  • The World Cafe protocol is an excellent way to mix student groups in one lesson and set an expectation that all students in class are collaborating with all other students. Be prepared to try this protocol a few times with students before they get used to it. Students will use the World Cafe protocol again in Units 2 and 3, so take time in this lesson to be sure the routine is clear.

Vocabulary

cite, text-based evidence, analyze, points of view, effectively, engage 

(no new vocabulary from the text, but encourage students to use key vocabulary from previous lessons in their discussions)

Materials

  • A Long Walk to Water (book; one per student)
  • Self-Reflection on Learning Targets (one per student and one to display)
  • Reader's Notes (students' copies from Chapters 1-5)
  • Gathering Evidence graphic organizers (students' copies for Chapters 1-4)
  • Document camera
  • World Cafe materials/setup: 
  • World Cafe protocol directions (one for document projector or charted on board) 
  • Classroom divided into three sections, with each having enough room for one-third of the class to sit at tables in small groups of three (triads).
  • Table card prompts (with tables in each section having the same question and each section having a different question. 
  • One recording chart for each triad (chart paper with two column headings--one column for "Nya" and another for "Salva") 
  • A marker for each triad.
  • Pre-Writing Ideas (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Written Self-reflection (5 minutes)   

  • Congratulate students on their focused work in Lesson 8 in the completion of the Mid-Unit Assessment. Share with students a realistic and respectful timeline in which they can expect that their graded work will be returned to them, and clarify any class-based or school-wide revision policies to help them achieve success.
  • Read aloud the first learning target, "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character." Remind students that this learning target was a big part of their Mid-Unit Assessment. 
  • Display and distribute the Self-Reflection on Learning Targets. Ask students to take out a piece of neat, blank, lined paper. Prompt students to silently write a self-reflection about this learning target. Write on the board, 

* "How are you making progress with this learning target? What's one aspect of the learning target that you think you are completing successfully? Why? What are you doing well?" 

* "What's one aspect of the learning target that is more challenging to you? Why? What makes it more challenging?"

  • Collect students' self-reflections.

B. Introducing Learning Targets and Gathering Notes (5 minutes)

  • Share the remaining learning targets:

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva."

* "I can effectively engage in discussions with my classmates about our reading."

* "I can select ideas from my notes to support my analysis of the characters Nya and Salva."

  • Read aloud to remind students about the Guiding Question, "How do culture, time, and place influence the development of identity?"
  • Tell students that today, they will synthesize their current understanding of the characters Nya and Salva, and begin to organize our ideas for some upcoming writing. Ask students for a quick thumbs up if they understand the targets. Clarify as needed. 
  • Give students several minutes to gather and read over their notes from the Gathering Evidence graphic organizers they have completed for Chapters 1-4. 
  • Encourage them to use the vocabulary they have been learning during their discussion.
  • Provide sentence starters for the self-reflection as needed (sample provided in Materials at the end of this lesson)
  • Checking in with learning targets helps students self-assess their learning. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners most.
  • The written self-reflections give the teacher a chance to compare evidence of students' progress from the Mid-Unit Assessment and students' sense of progress. These self-reflection documents are great tools to prompt discussions if there is a discrepancy between the evidence and assessment, and can be kept in student portfolios of work for end-of-year reflection writings or conferences

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. World Cafe Discussion Protocol (20 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their text, A Long Walk to Water, as well as their Reader's Notes for Chapters 1 through 5 and Gathering Evidence graphic organizers for Chapters 1 through 4. 
  • Arrange students into triads, with each triad sitting at a table with materials for the World Cafe: recording chart, a marker, and one table card prompt (see Materials at the end of this lesson).
  • Display the World Cafe protocol directions on the document camera or on a chart. Briefly review the protocol directions. 
  • Assure students that you will guide them through the process in today's lesson, and that they will practice a World Cafe in the future. Encourage students to enjoy the protocol today, as it will help them all participate and mix groups. Reassure students that the protocol will feel fast-paced at first, because it's designed to give every student a chance to think for a little bit about each question. Caution students that you will interrupt their conversations, but they'll have a chance to keep working with their ideas at the end of the activity.
  • Tell students a simple signal you will use to indicate when each round is done (e.g., raising hands, clapping). 
  • Round I: 

* Ask each triad to choose a student to be the "Recorder" for the first round. The Recorder will write down ideas from the group's conversation on the recording chart at the table. Ask all groups to have their Recorder raise his or her hand.

* Remind students to use their Reader's Notes, Gathering Evidence graphic organizers, and the novel to support their discussions.

* Focus students on the question on their table card prompts. Ask them to read the question aloud and then discuss that question. Ask the Recorder to take notes on the table's recording chart in the appropriate column or columns (one column labeled "Nya" and one column labeled "Salva"). Remind Recorders to make their letters about 1 inch in height so that their writing will be visible when posted at the end of the activity.

* After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students' attention. Explain the transition that they will do momentarily: 

  1. The Recorders will stay seated at the table where they have been working. 
  2. The other pair of students in each triad will stand and rotate together to the table in the next section with different table card prompts (i.e., the two people standing at a table about Nya's identity move to a table about Salva's identity; or the two people standing at the table about Salva's identity move to a table about both characters' identities).

* Signal students to transition quickly and quietly.

  • Round II:

* Give specific positive praise for students who transitioned smoothly (this is important to help students begin to learn the protocol).

* Be sure that the Round I Recorder has remained at his/her original table. Tell the class the following three steps, then prompt them to begin: 

  1. The Round I Recorder summarizes the conversation that happened at that table during Round I. 
  2. Choose a new Round II Recorder from the new students at the table. 
  3. The new group reads the question on their table card prompt, then begins a discussion about that question. 

* Remind students to use their Reader's Notes, Gathering Evidence graphic organizers, and the novel to support their discussions. Prompt the Round II Recorder to take notes on the table's recording chart in the appropriate column or columns (one column labeled "Nya" and one column labeled "Salva"). Remind Recorders to make their letters about 1 inch in height so that their writing will be visible when posted at the end of the activity.

* After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students' attention. Remind them of the transition:

  1. Round II Recorders will stay seated at the table where they have been working. 
  2. The other pair of students in each triad will stand and rotate together to the table in the next section with different table card prompts.

* Signal the transition to Round III. 

  • Round III

* Repeat the process from Round II. 

* Be sure that the Round II Recorder has remained at his/her Round II table. Review the three steps, then prompt them to begin: 

  1. The Round II Recorder summarizes the conversation that happened at that table during Round I. 
  2. Choose a new Round III Recorder from the new students at the table. 
  3. The new group reads the question on their table card prompt, then begins a discussion about that question. 

* Remind them to use their Reader's Notes, Gathering Evidence graphic organizers, and the novel to support their discussions. Prompt the new Recorder to take notes on the table's recording chart in the appropriate column or columns (one column labeled "Nya" and one column labeled "Salva"). Remind Recorders to make their letters about 1 inch in height so that their writing will be visible when posted at the end of the activity.

* After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students' attention. Remind them of the transition:

  1. Round III  Recorders will stay seated at the table where they have been working. 
  2. The other pair of students in each triad will stand and rotate together to the table in the next section with different table card prompts.
  • After 3 minutes, use the signal to get students' attention. At this point students should have discussed each of the questions on the table card prompts. Thank students for their participation and collaboration during their first World Cafe. Tell students that they will have a chance to use a World Cafe again to practice the different steps. 
  • Ask all Round II Recorders to bring their recording charts to the front of the room and post them so that they are visible to all students. 
  • The World Cafe protocol can be difficult to explain through written instructions and visual cues. Students benefit from guided prompts along the way, in particular providing kinesthetic cues to orient them to the steps of the World Cafe. 
  • This discussion protocol intentionally moves at a fast pace. This is because students will be rotating through a series of three questions, so classmates are often just reiterating the ideas that others have recorded in a previous round. 
  • Because students will be interrupted in the midst of the World Cafe protocol, it's important to remind students of an agreed-upon signal that the teacher will use to respectfully get their attention. If such a signal is not already in use in the classroom, consider using a combination of a visual and auditory signal, like a chime and hand-raising.
  • Because the students are working with three different table prompts in this World Cafe, and the students acting as Recorders in the first round of the World Cafe protocol will remain seated for the transition to the second round, it is necessary to hold four rounds of the World Cafe. This ensures that all students have had time to discuss all three posted table card prompts. Often, students will increase efficiency in their discussions as the World Cafe progresses. This is a great time to circulate and prompt students to look at specific areas in their notes or the text to add to their discussion. 
  • Be sure to keep the final World Cafe charts from each group, as they will be used in the final Performance Task for the module.
  • B.   For students who need additional support, consider allowing them to discuss their ideas out loud with a partner before recording on their graphic organizer.
  • Be sure to keep individual students' pre-writing ideas from the end of this lesson for them to refer back to during Units 2 and 3.

B. Planning for Writing: Selecting Ideas (10 minutes) 

  • Encourage students to consider how much they've learned about these two characters from South Sudan, Nya and Salva, and remind the students that they have a large amount of knowledge to now share with others. Tell students that selecting their ideas is a critical aspect of the writing process. 
  • Distribute the Pre-writing Ideas graphic organizer to each student. 
  • Focus students on the top part of the graphic organizer, and model briefly what they might write under the headings for both Nya and Salva. Share with students the following ideas as examples (use shorthand to write these examples): "Because Nya's story happens in 2008, she is not fleeing from a war but is able to stay home and help her family find water every day." AND "Salva is unsure every time he meets new people, because he is Dinka, and the Dinka are at war with the Nuer and in a Civil War with the government." Point out to students that the first example connects with what they know about time influencing Nya's identity, and the second example connects with what they know about culture influencing Salva's identity.
  • Prompt students to work silently for a few minutes to write a few ideas about what they've learned about Nya's and Salva's character--specifically how culture, time, or place have influenced the character. Continue to reinforce with students the link to this Guiding Question. 
  • Encourage students to refer to the posted charts from the World Cafe to give them ideas for their writing.
  • Cold call on three students to share their initial ideas, and offer encouragement to their responses.
  • Collect these pre-writing ideas to review for feedback to each student. Be sure to keep these pre-writing ideas for students' use in Unit 2 and Unit 3 of this module.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Revisit Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Tell students that they have accomplished a lot in the past few days. Reread the learning targets:

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character." 

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva."

* "I can effectively engage in discussions with my classmates about our reading."

* "I can select ideas from my notes to support my analysis of the characters Nya and Salva."

  • Tell students that they will continue to practice with a learning target similar to "I can select ideas from my notes to support my analysis of the characters Nya and Salva" in Lesson 10.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book for this unit at home.

Note: Be sure to keep the final World Cafe charts from each group, as they will be used in the final Performance Task for the module.

Also be sure to keep individual students' pre-writing ideas from the end of this lesson for them to refer back to during Units 2 and 3.

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