Mid-Unit Assessment: Gathering and Using Evidence to Analyze Points of View in A Long Walk to Water (Chapter 5) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M1:U1:L8

Mid-Unit Assessment: Gathering and Using Evidence to Analyze Points of View in A Long Walk to Water (Chapter 5)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters in a literary text. (RL.7.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water.
  • I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Reader's Notes
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Gathering Evidence graphic organizer (focus on Character Development) and answers to text-dependent questions

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening 

A. Engaging the Reader: Sharing Gist from Reader's Notes   (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Discussion: Questions for Nya and Salva (10 minutes)

B. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from a Long Walk to Water (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Introduce Independent Reading (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

Begin reading your independent reading book for this unit at home.

  • In this lesson, students complete the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer and respond to one text-dependent question independently for a graded Mid-Unit Assessment. This task calls upon students to employ the practices of close reading that they have been practicing in Lessons 1-7.
  • Revise the criteria for the Mid-Unit Assessment using notes from the Opening of Lesson 4, when students shared criteria for strong and weak examples of gathering evidence.
  • Review Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol (used in Lesson 3; see Appendix 1).
  • In advance: Prepare the Unit 1 Recommended Texts list (separate document on EngageNY) for students to look at; if possible, have some of the books available for students to browse. 

Vocabulary

cite, text-based evidence, analyze, points of view, effectively, engage, detail/evidence, inference/reasoning; luscious (28)

Materials

  • A Long Walk to Water (book; one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and using Evidence from A Long Walk to Water (Chapter 5) (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and using Evidence from A Long Walk to Water (Chapter 5)(one per student) (Answers for Teacher Reference)
  • Back-to-Back and  Face-to-Face prompts (Chapter 5) (one for display)
  • Unit 1 Recommended Texts list (separate document on EngageNY.org)

Opening

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Sharing Gist from Reader's Notes and Introducing Learning Targets (5 minutes)   

  • Prompt students to take out A Long Walk to Water and the Reader's Notes with Chapter 5 homework complete. 
  • Remind students that last night they were able to "Think" about the gist of Nya's and Salva's stories in Chapter 5, and they have written their notes in Columns 2 and 4 of the Reader's Notes. Ask  students to turn to a partner to read to each other what each one of them wrote in Columns 2 and 4. Cold call three students to share what their partner wrote for Columns 2 and 4, then prompt all students to add to Columns 3 and 5 any new ideas about what Chapter 5 was about. 
  • Share the learning targets: 

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water."

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water."

  • Tell students that today they get to demonstrate their progress on these learning targets in the Mid-Unit Assessment. 
  • Assure students that there are no tricks to this assessment; it really is the exact process they've been practicing in class through Lessons 1-7. Tell students that to get their minds ready for the assessment, they first will do an oral activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Discussion: Questions for Nya and Salva (10 minutes

  • Post on the document projector (or have written on a chart) the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face prompts. Before students stand up, review the instructions for the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Ask for one student volunteer to describe the directions to the class in his/her own words. 
  • Help students arrange into partnerships for this discussion activity. Then begin. 
  • Circulate to listen in as students share, to gauge their depth of understanding of the text. Encourage them to elaborate on their answers, with probes such as "What else might Salva say?"
  • Tell students that everyone needs to remain silent until all students are done with the Mid-Unit Assessment, that this commitment is how they show respect for each other and it is non-negotiable. Write on the board, "If you finish early, you can..." and prompt students to suggest appropriate, silent activities that they can complete. This list should include "Continue reading in A Long Walk to Water and making notes on the Reader's Notes about the gist of upcoming chapters." The list could also include "Complete homework for other classes" or "Browse some of the independent reading books for this unit" or "Sit quietly."
  •  The Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face discussion activity acts as a physical and mental release for students' focus before the Mid-Unit Assessments. Ensuring that students have opportunities to incorporate physical movement in the classroom supports their academic success. This opening activity is meant to help students synthesize their current understandings of the characters in the novel in a low-stakes structure.
  • Taking time to ask for students' ideas about other tasks they can complete while their classmates are working can greatly enhance student buy-in for setting clear expectations for students' focused work.

B. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from A Long Walk to Water (25 minutes)

  • Prompt students to take out their text, A Long Walk to Water. Distribute a copy of the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and using Evidence from A Long Walk to Water (Chapter 5) to each student. Tell students to remain silent until all classmates are finished with their work, and prompt students to begin.
  • As students complete their Mid-Unit 1 Assessment, encourage them to stay seated and complete one of the tasks listed on the board ("If you finish early, you can...").
  • Collect students' assessments. 
  • The Mid-Unit 1 Assessment provides strong evidence for students' practice of gathering evidence from text and making sense of that evidence, necessary scaffolds for reading a complex text and for writing. In Lessons 9 through 13, students will be practicing this same skill of gathering evidence, though they'll be working with more complex informational text and adding steps to support writing. This work will culminate in an End of Unit 1 Assessment in Lesson 14. Therefore, strive to return the Mid-Unit 1 assessment to students by Lessons 10 or 11 so that they have time to receive feedback on this work and prepare for the next assessment of similar skills.
  • For this assessment, provide appropriate accommodations (i.e., extra time) for ELLs and students with special needs. 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Introduce Independent Reading (5 minutes)

  • Once all students have completed the Mid-Unit Assessment, tell students that each unit in this module is accompanied by an extensive list of Recommended Texts at a variety of reading levels. They can use the classroom, school, or local library to obtain book(s) about the topics under study at their independent reading level. Build up the excitement about these additional texts--this is a way students can really learn a lot about the topic they are studying, which will help them engage more in the novel, and will also help them become even better readers. 
  • Tell students that these books can be used in a variety of ways--as independent and partner reading in the classroom whenever time allows, as read-alouds by the teacher to entice students into new books, and as an ongoing homework expectation. During this unit, let students know that you expect them to read at home from a related book at their independent reading level. In addition, students may be assigned additional work, such as rereading complex text or completing a writing task.
  • Share the recommended texts for this unit with students, and prompt all students to select one text to take home for independent reading.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Begin reading your independent reading book for this unit at home. 
  • Students who cannot yet read independently at any level will benefit from hearing books read to them, either by a caregiver or through audio recordings. Hearing books/texts can be an ongoing assignment for these students.
  • In addition, www.novelnewyork.org has a free, searchable database of content-related texts that can be played as audio files on a home or library computer. Texts on this site can also be translated into many languages. Use the database to provide at-home reading of related texts to ELLs and their families in their native languages.

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