Practicing Structures for Reading: Gathering and Using Evidence to Analyze Salva’s and Nya’s Points of View (Chapter 4) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M1:U1:L7

Practicing Structures for Reading: Gathering and Using Evidence to Analyze Salva’s and Nya’s Points of View (Chapter 4)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters in a literary text. (RL.7.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water.
  • I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Reader's Notes
  • Gathering Evidence graphic organizer (focus on Character Development) and answers to text-dependent questions
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Introducing Learning Targets and Highlighting Key Vocabulary (5 minutes)

2.   Work Time

A. Sharing Gist of Chapter 4 from Reader's Notes (10 minutes)

B. Gathering Evidence from Chapter 4 (second read) (15 minutes)

C. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment 

A. Revisit Learning Targets (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read Chapter 5 for gist and complete Columns 1, 2, and 4 in Reader's Notes.

  • This lesson acts as a culmination of practices in close reading that have been building since Lesson 1. In Lessons 1 and 2, students practiced reading a text for the gist. In Lesson 3, they answered questions that demanded attention to text details (a preview of text-dependent questions). Lessons 4 and 5 introduced the practices of rereading and gathering evidence from the text; Lesson 6 introduced annotating text, focusing on key vocabulary, and discussing to clarify thinking or deepen understanding; and now Lesson 7 adds a specific selected response question. 
  • In advance: Using the exit tickets from Lesson 5, determine which students, if any, continue to struggle with gathering and analyzing evidence in text. These students can be pulled into a small group for more targeted instruction during Work Time Part B of this lesson.

Vocabulary

cite, text-based evidence, analyze, points of view, effectively, engage, detail/evidence, inference/reasoning; sorghum (20), terrain, scrub, woodland (22), stands (n), stunted, unripe, worm-rotten (23)

Materials

  • A Long Walk to Water (book; one per student)
  • Things Close Readers Do anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; see additions in supporting materials)--in today's lesson, you'll add the practice of using the text to gather evidence for answers to text-dependent questions 
  • Gathering Evidence graphic organizer for Character Development (for Chapter 4; one per student)
  • Text-dependent questions for Chapter 4 (one per student)
  • Text-dependent questions for Chapter 4 (Sample Response for Teacher Reference)
  • Document camera

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing Learning Targets and Highlighting Key Vocabulary (5 minutes) 

  • Share the learning targets:

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water."

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water.

  • Point out that these learning targets are familiar, and that students should use today's lesson as a final practice before a graded Mid-Unit Assessment (in Lesson 8), in which they will show what they have learned related to these targets. 
  • Keep students with partner pairs from Lesson 4 ("B-Day" seating). Remind students that they'll practice our Partner Talk Expectations with these partners so that they can share ideas with different classmates.
  • Remind students that for homework, you also asked them to pay close attention to important words in the text. Ask volunteers to share out some of the words they noticed: either words that they did not know or words that seemed particularly important related to the guiding question. 
  • Chart the words students share. Circle the following words if students mentioned them; if not, add them. Tell students that later in the lesson, they will focus more on these particular words: sorghum, terrain, scrub, woodland, stands (n), stunted, unripe, worm-rotten. 
  • To further support ELL vocabulary acquisition, consider providing translations of key academic or content vocabulary into students' home language. Resources such as Google Translate and bilingual translation dictionaries can assist with one-word translation.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing Gist of Chapter 4 from Reader's Notes (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that to begin class you would like them to share their homework from Chapter 4. Ask students to take out A Long Walk to Water and the Reader's Notes from Chapter 4. 
  • Remind students that last night they were able to "Think" about the gist of Nya's and Salva's stories in Chapter 4, and they have written their notes in Columns 2 and 4 of the Reader's Notes. Ask students to turn to a partner to read to each other what each of them wrote in Columns 2 and 4 (Think-Pair...). Tell them to listen carefully to what their partner shares, because you will be calling on them to share their partner's thoughts with the class.
  • Remind students that now they'll Share their ideas so that they can help each other make sense of the text. Cold call three students to share what their partner wrote for Columns 2 and 4, then prompt all students to add to Columns 3 and 5 any new ideas about what Chapter 4 was about. 
  • Clarify any lingering confusions about the gist of Chapter 4, to ensure all students understand basic plot lines.

* Nya returned home, was given food, and was told by her mother that she needed to take her five-year-old sister on her second daily walk for the pond. (Probe: based on the sentence, what do you think sorghum is? Clarify quickly: it is a grain.)

* Salva joined the group of walkers who were from the Dinka tribe and continued walking. 

* One member of the group, named Buksa, heard something; Salva followed him, and they found a beehive.

  •  To provide further visual support, consider projecting a copy of the Gathering Evidence graphic organizers from Lesson 4. This can act as a visual aid for sharing directions in this portion of the lesson

B. Gathering Evidence from Chapter 4 of A Long Walk to Water (second read) (15 minutes) 

  • Distribute a new copy of the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer II (with text-dependent question) to each student and project it on a document camera (or make a chart of it on chart paper or on your board). 
  • Prompt students to notice that this graphic organizer is different from the one used in Lessons 4 and 5 because it includes an important question at the end for which the students must use the text. Explain that you would like students to first reread the text and take notes independently, then when you prompt them, they share their notes and discuss this question with a partner.
  • Ask all students to open A Long Walk to Water to page 20, the beginning of Chapter 4. Ask students to reread Chapter 4 on their own, using the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer to take notes. During this time, circulate among the students to offer support and encouragement for their practice of gathering evidence and making inferences.
  • For students who continue to struggle with gathering and analyzing evidence, consider pulling a small group to provide more targeted instruction on gathering and analyzing evidence from text.

C. Answering Text-Dependent Questions (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn their attention to the Text-dependent Questions for Chapter 4. Prompt students to take five minutes of silent work time to respond to this question. 
  • Then, ask students to Think-Pair-Share their selections with a partner. Cold call on two students to share their responses with the whole class. 
  • Do not display the Text-dependent questions for Chapter 4 (sample response for teacher reference), but use them to guide the conversation.  Clarify for students that the correct selections were that "Salva was impressed with Buksa" and that the text that indicates this feeling is, "By now Salva had caught the feeling of excitement."
  • Prompt students to describe how they selected this correct answer. Chart on the board any suggestions students develop, such as, "First, I reread the section about Buksa." Or "I eliminated some choices in Part A that I knew were not true--Salva was never afraid of Buksa."
  • Give students specific positive feedback: examples of where you saw them using the text to determine the correct answer to these text-dependent questions.
  • Text-dependent questions can be answered only by referring explicitly back to the text being read. This encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and allows for a deeper understanding. 
  • Consider having students who are struggling talk with their partners before they respond in writing to the questions.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Revisit Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Reread the learning targets

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water."

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water." 

  • Direct students' attention to the Things Close Readers Do anchor chart. Ask students if they experienced any new practices or strategies today that should be added to the list on this chart. Give students a moment to turn and talk, and then invite volunteers to share. Add lines to the anchor chart (using students' own words if possible) about the following: using the text to gather evidence for answers to text-dependent questions. 
  • Tell students that there will be a graded Mid-Unit Assessment during Lesson 8. Encourage students to feel confident about this assessment. Say, "This is a chance to show that you know how to gather evidence about our characters, Nya and Salva. You'll also be asked to answer one text-dependent question, just like you did today." Show students that the format of the Mid-Unit Assessment is the same format as the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer with which they have been practicing.
  • For the day's Exit Ticket, students may benefit from sentence starters for the reflective portion of the prompt. Post sentence starters like "I think this example shows my abilities to cite evidence because..." or "I selected this evidence because it tells me ____ about the characters in the book."

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 5 for gist and complete Columns 1, 2, and 4 in Reader's Notes.

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