Practicing Structures for Reading: Gathering Evidence about Salva’s and Nya’s Points of View (Reread Chapter 3) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M1:U1:L5

Practicing Structures for Reading: Gathering Evidence about Salva’s and Nya’s Points of View (Reread Chapter 3)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.7.1)
  • I can analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters in a literary text. (RL.7.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water.
  • I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Gathering Evidence graphic organizer (focus on Character Development)
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Introducing Learning Targets and Highlighting Key Vocabulary (5 minutes)

2. Work Time 

A. Sharing the Gist from Chapter 3 Reader's Notes (10 minutes)

B. Gathering Evidence and Inferring about Character in Chapter 3 (20 minutes)

C. Revisiting Key Vocabulary in Relation to the Guiding Question (5 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment 

A. Revisit Learning Targets with Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

4. Homework 

A. Reread Chapter 3, focusing on vocabulary that relates to the Guiding Question 

  • In this lesson, students continue to practice gathering evidence from the text to support their understanding of character point of view (which they began in Lesson 4). Gauge how well your students are mastering the thinking behind the graphic organizer: gathering evidence and then making inferences. Adjust Part B of Work Time to include more modeling or guided practice as needed (for examples of this, refer to Lesson 4). 
  • In advance: See Teacher Note at the end of Lesson 4. Identify several strong examples of students' work on the graphic organizer from Lesson 4. Strong examples should show good citations of evidence (clear details/evidence in the form of quotes) that support rich analysis (relevant and clear inferences/reasoning. Also prepare your own (fictional) weak example. This should show poor citations of evidence (unclear details/evidence that may not be in the form of quotes) that does not support analysis (unclear or unrelated inferences/reasoning.
  • Students repeat the processes of close reading that they've practiced so far. They review their Reader's Notes for the gist of Chapter 3, then reread the chapter to Gather Evidence about character and respond to teacher prompts to justify their reasoning.
  • At the start of this lesson, students are alerted to some key vocabulary to attend to as they work; during Work Time Part C, they return to some of these key words. 
  • Emphasize to students the importance of keeping their Reader's Notes and Gathering Evidence graphic organizers. They will need these at the end of Unit 2, for their literary analysis, and again in Unit 3, when they write a Two-Voice Poem. 

Vocabulary

cite, text-based evidence, analysis, culture, time, place, identity, detail/evidence, inference/reasoning; horizon (14), gourd (14), ritual (15), flinched, uncertainty (16), artillery, rose (v) (18)

Materials

  • A Long Walk to Water (book; one per student)
  • Gathering Evidence graphic organizer for Character Development (for Chapter 3; one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Partner Talk Expectations achor chart (from Lesson 1)

Opening

Opening

A. Introducing Learning Targets and Highlighting Key Vocabulary (5 minutes) 

  • Share the learning targets:

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water."

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water."

  • Remind students that they practiced these same learning targets in Lesson 4, and they'll strengthen their practice with them in today's lesson.
  • Keep students with partner pairs from Lesson 4 ("B-Day" seating). Remind students that they'll practice the Partner Talk Expectations with these partners so that they can share ideas with different classmates.
  • Remind students that for homework, you also asked them to pay close attention to important words in the text. Ask volunteers to share out some of the words they noticed: either words that they did not know or words that were particularly important.
  • Chart the words students share. Circle the following words if students mentioned them; if not, add them. Tell students that later in the lesson, they will focus more on these words: gourd, ritual, flinched, uncertainty, artillery, rose.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing the Gist from Chapter 3 Reader's Notes (10 minutes)

  • Prompt students to take out A Long Walk to Water and the Reader's Notes with Chapter 3 homework complete. 
  • Remind students that last night they were able to think about the gist of the rest of Chapter 3. Revisit the focus on text features from Lesson 1, asking students the date of this section. Clarify as needed: be sure students recognize that the first section was about Nya and the longer section was about Salva. 
  • Focus students on Nya's and Salva's stories in Chapter 3, for which they should have written their notes in Columns 2 and 4, respectively, of the Reader's Notes. Tell students that at this point, it is fine if they just got the gist of Chapter 3; they will return to this chapter in future lessons. 
  • Ask students to turn to their partner to read to each other what each one of them wrote in Columns 2 and 4. (Think-Pair...)
  • Remind students that now they'll "Share" their ideas so that they can help each other make sense of the text. Cold call three students to share what their partner wrote for Columns 2 and 4. 
  • Then prompt all students to add to Columns 3 and 5 any new ideas about what Chapter 3 was about. 
  • After these three students share, give feedback so that all students have the following "gist" statements in their Reader's Notes. 
  • As you paraphrase students' statements, guide them to refer to specific vocabulary in the text as they answer. Tell them that in the next section of the lesson, they will focus on some important words in even more detail. 

* Nya reached a pond, drank water, filled her container with water, then began the return walk home. 

* Salva woke up to find the group had left him; then he spotted an older Dinka woman. 

* The woman offered him some peanuts and let him sleep in her barn for four days. 

* She told him he had to leave, and he heard people from another group of walkers, also from the Dinka tribe.

  •  To provide further visual support, consider projecting a copy of the Gathering Evidence graphic organizers from Lesson 4. This can act as a visual aid for sharing directions in this portion of the lesson.

B. Gathering Evidence and Inferring about Character in Chapter 3 (20 minutes)

  • On the document camera or on a large chart paper, show students the strong examples of Details/Evidence and Inference/Reasoning from Lesson 4 exit tickets (their selected work on the Gathering Evidence graphic organizers) and your own written-up weak example. 
  • Prompt students to Think-Pair-Share about the qualities of a strong example and the qualities of a weak example. Cold call on three partner pairs to share their ideas about qualities of strong and weak examples. Copy student ideas onto the examples of strong and weak work, and tell students how helpful these ideas are. 
  • Tell them that you will use their ideas to develop a rubric for grading their future work for citing text-based evidence. Look for student ideas related to "The strong example makes a good connection between the quote and the inference (the words from the quote match some of the words in the inference)," "The strong example includes an insight about the character that I hadn't thought of before," or "The strong example says exactly how the evidence relates to culture, time, or place."
  • For today's continued work with Chapter 3, distribute the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer to each student and project it on a document camera (or make a chart of it on chart paper or on your board). 
  • Ask students to silently reread the directions on the graphic organizer and complete the tasks that the prompts indicate.
  • Tell students that the first column, titled "Detail/Evidence," is where they will gather quotes from the text. The third column, titled "Inference/Reasoning," is where they will write their ideas about how the text is related to the Guiding Question. 
  • Ask students to open A Long Walk to Water to page 14, the beginning of Chapter 3. Read aloud the section about Nya ending with the line, "But she might reach home by noon, if all went well." Show students where this text is written as an example on the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer. 
  • Ask students to turn to a partner and discuss the following question: 

* "Based on the example in the first row of the graphic organizer, How do you think the cited evidence from 
 the text supports the listed inference?"

  • Cold call a few pairs to share their thinking. If necessary, clarify this example by thinking aloud for students. For example, you might say something like the following: "When I read, "Nya knew that going home would take longer than coming had," I reasoned that she still had a number of challenges to face in her day ... This made me think that her walk to and from the pond is very difficult. I'm now wondering what other difficulties she might face."
  • Tell students to not put any mark in the final (right-hand) column of the graphic organizer. They will return to these charts later as they develop their ideas in writing.
  • Tell students that now you will read aloud from the remainder of Chapter 3 (which students have already read at least once). Pause along the way for students to use the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer. 
  • Begin at the start of Chapter 3. After each of the chunks indicated below, prompt students to share their evidence and inferences with partners or have them share with whole class using cold call. 
  • As needed, provide additional modeling through this guided practice time. Gauge whether to continue whole group or to gradually release students to more independent work. 

* Chunk 1: Nya's story (pages 14-15)

* Chunk 2: Salva's story (page 15 "Southern Sudan 1985" through page 17 "Everything was upside down")

* Chunk 3: Salva's story, cont. (page 17 "Salva stayed in the woman's barn again..." through end of chapter "Could his family be among them?")

  • Tell students that they may choose to focus on either Nya or Salva. 
  • Ask them to reread at least one page of Chapter 3, and work at first with a partner to add at least one more piece of evidence and reasoning on the Gathering Evidence graphic organizer. Encourage them. Tell them that if possible, they should each complete at least one row on the graphic organizer independently, so that you have individual information from each student. 
  • During this time, circulate among students to monitor progress and offer support.
  • After 15-20 minutes, pause students in their work and refocus them whole group. Ask students to revisit the list of ideas about strong examples of evidence and inferences and Think-Pair-Share about one of their examples from today's reading of Chapter 3. Cold call on three students to explain why the example they selected is a strong example of citing evidence to make inferences about character.
  • Be sure to have the strong examples from the exit tickets from Lesson 4 and the weak example that you have written up prepared to share with students. In the midst of this lesson you will present this collection of examples to help students get a clear vision of meeting the learning target "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water."
  • For students in need of additional support with the practice of gathering evidence, consider creating a more scaffolded version of the graphic organizer in which the text has already been selected, and students can focus on their inferences/reasoning about the textual evidence (for an example, see supporting materials from Lesson 4). 
  • Gauge your students' progress carefully, and feel free to continue with more guided practice as needed to support students who are struggling to gather and analyze evidence from the text.

C. Revisiting Key Vocabulary in Relation to the Guiding Question (5 minutes)

Briefly revisit the vocabulary words to which you alerted students at the start of the lesson. Help students notice how focusing on specific words aids their understanding of key aspects of the novel: 

* "Both Nya and Salva look across the horizon and use a gourd to hold water. What do these words mean, and what do they help us understand about how place influnces Nya's and Salva's identity?" 

Invite students to turn and talk with a partner. Then cold call a student to share out. Listen for students to recognize that the land both characters live on is vast, harsh, and dry.

* "What are the ritual scar patterns on the woman's face, and why are they important to help us understand how culture shapes his identity?"

Again have students turn and talk, then share out. Listen for students to realize that it was important to Salva to know that this woman was a member of the Dinka tribe, as he is. 

* "On page 18, the author writes 'Salva stared at her as a panic rose inside him.' What does the word rose mean in this context? How does this help us understand something important about Salva?" 

Consider partnering an ELL with a student who speaks the same L1 when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Revisit Learning Targets with Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Preview the homework: Tell students that for homework, they should reread this chapter and circle other words that seem important because they relate to the Guiding Question. 
  • Reread the learning targets:

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water."

* "I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva in A Long Walk to Water."

  • For today's exit ticket, prompt students to circle one row on their Gathering Evidence graphic organizers that they think best exemplifies their ability to analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts Nya's and Salva's points of view. 
  • Ask students to then write on the graphic organizer an explanation of why they selected this evidence. 
  • Collect all Gathering Evidence graphic organizers for review. 
  • For the day's Exit Ticket, students may benefit from sentence starters for the reflective portion of the prompt. Post sentence starters like "I think this example shows my abilities to cite evidence because..." or "I selected this evidence because it tells me ____ about the characters in the book."

Homework

Homework
  • Reread Chapter 3, focusing on vocabulary that relates to the Guiding Question. Circle these words as you read (including ones we already discussed in class).

Note: From the exit tickets, give individualized feedback to each student about his or her progress on the learning target "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character in A Long Walk to Water." Give each student at least one piece of specific positive feedback (e.g., "I see you are citing evidence" or "You really related that piece of evidence to the idea of 'culture'"). Lesson 6 begins with the teacher returning this individualized feedback to each student. Consider using these exit tickets to determine which students, if any, should be pulled for more targeted instruction on gathering and analyzing evidence in future lessons.

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