End of Unit Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from Informational Texts about the Dinka and Nuer Tribes | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G7:M1:U1:L14

End of Unit Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from Informational Texts about the Dinka and Nuer Tribes

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.7.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.7.4)
  • I can select evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.7.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of the article "Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps."
  • I can select evidence from the article "Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps" to support analysis of the perspectives of the Dinka tribe of Southern Sudan.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from Informational Texts about the Dinka and Nuer Tribes

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Introducing Learning Targets and End of Unit Assessment (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A. End of Unit Assessment: Gathering, Selecting, and Using Evidence to Analyze Perspective in Informational Text (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment 

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Discussion: Questions for the People of South Sudan (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

Continue reading your independent reading book for this unit at home.

  • In this lesson, students complete the Gathering Evidence and Selecting Evidence graphic organizer and respond to one constructed-response question independently for an End of Unit graded Assessment. This task calls upon students to employ the practices of close reading that they have been practicing throughout this unit, and to use the scaffolds for writing that they practiced during Lessons 12 and 13.
  • Unit 2 will challenge students with continued instruction and assessments of writing.
  • This lesson uses some of the same structures introduced for the Mid-Unit Assessment in Lesson 8, including setting norms for silent, focused work, and ending class with a Back to Back and Face to Face Discussion.
  • Create the rubric for the End of Unit Assessment using strategies from "Things Close Readers Do" and language from the lesson's learning targets.

Vocabulary

cite, text-based evidence, objectively, summarize, coherent, constructed-response, analysis, perspectives, detail/evidence, inference/reasoning

Materials

  • Reader's Notes (students' own from all previous lessons)
  • Document camera
  • "Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps" (from Lesson 13 homework; one per student; one to display; focus on excerpt 2)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from Informational Texts about the Dinka and Nuer Tribes (one per student)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from Informational Texts about the Dinka and Nuer Tribes (Answers for Teacher Reference)
  • Back to Back and Face to Face prompts (for Teacher Reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing Learning Targets and End of Unit Assessment (5 minutes) 

  • Share learning targets:

* "I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of the article 'Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps.'"

* "I can select evidence from the article 'Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps' to support analysis of the perspectives of the Dinka tribe of Southern Sudan."

  • Tell students that today they get to demonstrate their progress on these learning targets in the End of Unit Assessment. Assure students that there are no tricks to this assessment; it really is the exact process they've been practicing in class through Lessons 12 and 13.
  • Tell students that everyone needs to remain silent until all students are done with the End of Unit Assessment, that this commitment is how they show respect for each other and it is non-negotiable. Write on the board, "If you finish early, you can..." and prompt students to suggest appropriate, silent activities that they can complete. This list should include "Continue reading in A Long Walk to Water and making notes on the Reader's Notes about the gist of upcoming chapters." The list could also include "Complete homework for other classes" or "Continue reading your independent reading book for this unit" or "Sit quietly."
  • Taking time to ask for students' ideas about other tasks they can complete while their classmates are working can greatly enhance student buy-in for setting clear expectations for students' focused work.

Work Time

Work Time

A. End of Unit Assessment: Gathering, Selecting, and Using Evidence to Analyze Perspective 
 in Informational Text (25 minutes)

  • Distribute the End of Unit Assessment: Identifying Perspective and Using Evidence from Informational Texts about the Dinka and Nuer Tribes to each student. Tell students to remain silent until all classmates are finished with their work, and prompt students to begin.
  • If students complete their End of Unit Assessment, encourage them to stay seated and complete one of the tasks listed on the board ("If you finish early, you can...").
  • Collect students' assessments.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Discussion: Questions for the People of South Sudan (5 minutes)

  • Once all students have completed the End of Unit Assessment, post on the document projector (or have written on a chart) the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face prompts. Before students stand up, read through the instructions for the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Ask for one student volunteer to describe the directions to the class in his/her own words. 
  • Help students arrange into partnerships for this closing activity.
  • Circulate to listen in as students share, to gauge their depth of understanding of the text. Encourage them to elaborate on their answers, with probes such as "What else might a member of the Dinka tribe say?"

Note: Capture students' questions to possibly use during Unit 3, if you are able to arrange a visit with an immigrant from South Sudan.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book for this unit at home.

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