Analyze Model Position Paper with Rubric | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U3:L1

Analyze Model Position Paper with Rubric

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze a model position paper for topic and argument.
  • I can analyze the argument rubric to understand expectations of a position paper.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Author's Presentation of Events graphic organizer
  • Assessing model position paper with rubric 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Check in on Independent Reading (8 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Reading a Model Position Paper for Understanding  (15 minutes)

     B.  Understanding Expectations: Reading the Rubric (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: What Do You Think You Will Find

     B.  Most Challenging in Writing a Paper Like This? 
(5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read to meet the 30-minute reading goal in your independent reading book. Complete the Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.

  • As students start Unit 3, consider how to communicate with families about the students' independent reading goals, as well as the Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes. Their support is important. Consider how to routinely follow up with students' families or other adults who can support this reading work.
  • In advance: Prepare a sample letter for parents about students' reading goals and accountability for reading progress.
  • Although this is the first official lesson of Unit 3, students began preparing for the writing portion of this module in the last unit when they determined their claim or position on the question: "Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?"
  • Students have the research folder that they have been using to keep the materials for this module. The Author's Presentation Events graphic organizer has already been used, but another copy is included in the supporting materials for ease of use.
  • Before writing a position paper, it is important that students know the expectations and study a well-written example of this kind of writing. To develop understanding, students will read a model position paper to identify the topic and the argument.
  • Students are introduced to the Position Paper Argument Rubric, which is very similar to the expository rubric students have used previously. In this lesson, the focus is on introducing a topic, and using claim, reasons, and evidence along with academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
  • Students will work with a partner to use the rubric to assess the model essay as a way to increase their understanding of the expectations for writing a position paper.
  • In advance: Determine appropriate student partners for assessing the model position paper using the rubric.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

analyze, content, argument, rubric, expectations

Materials

  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Model position paper: "Hydraulic Fracturing" (one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Author's Presentation of Events graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • Research folders (from Unit 2)
  • Position Paper Argument Rubric (one per student in research folder; one to display)
  • Exit ticket (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Check in on Independent Reading (8 minutes)

  • Check in with students:

* "Are you meeting your reading goal? If so, how are you doing it? If not, what is getting in the way?"

  • Compliment successes. Encourage accomplishing daily steps for achievement and asking for support.
  • Display the Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes using a document camera. Ask students to assess their own entries.
  • Invite students to join their reading groups and share an interesting scene or favorite character from their book.
  • Circulate and listen as students share. Observe to see where support is needed for setting and achieving goals.
  • Provide support for students who need help achieving their reading goals.
  • Select students may benefit from teacher participation in small reading groups to discuss their Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you.

* "I can analyze a model position paper for topic and argument."

* "I can analyze the argument rubric to understand expectations of a position paper."

  • Ask students:

* "What words in the learning target do you think are most important? Why?

  • As students respond, circle words on the posted learning targets and annotate words for meaning or associations. Guide students to the words analyze, argumentrubric, and expectations.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading a Model Position Paper for Understanding  (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that all strong pieces of writing have a focus and a purpose. For writers to accomplish this, they need to know what the content should be, or what topic to explore. Writers also need to know what writing process they should use to clearly express the position or claim that they want their readers to understand.
  • Tell the class that now they will have a chance to read a model position paper to see what the content of the paper is, or what topic was addressed.
  • Distribute the model position paper: "Hydraulic Fracturing" to students.
  • Invite students to closely read along as you read aloud.
  • Remind students that they are reading this position paper to determine:

* "What is the content, or topic, of the position paper?"

  • Use equity sticks to call on students to respond to that question. Listen for responses that explain:

*  The article is about the use of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to collect natural gas from the earth.

*  Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a process that is used to get natural gas from the earth so it can be used for energy.

  • Recognize students for their ability to accurately determine the topic of the essay. Tell students that they will now have the opportunity to reread the model position paper. In this reading, the goal is to read closely for the argument the author presents.
  • Before rereading, invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What is an argument that's presented in writing?"

  • Call on pairs to share their definition of an author's argument. Listen for responses that explain that an argument is the set of reasons an author uses to persuade readers about his/her claim or position.
  • Distribute the Author's Presentation of Events graphic organizer.
  • Use the document camera to introduce students to the graphic organizer. 
  • Tell students to now reread the model position paper to determine the argument with their Think-Pair-Share partners. Ask students to use the graphic organizer as they determine the writer's argument with their partners.
  • Circulate and listen as students read and determine the argument. Provide support as needed.
  • Refocus the students as a whole class to share the author's argument they have identified. Listen for responses such as:

* "Hydraulic fracturing should be used to collect natural gas if it's done safely because it benefits the environment and it's good for people."

  • Compliment students for using both the author's claim and reasons to determine the argument. Explain that the close reading they did will help them understand the expectations writers have to produce well-written position papers.
  • The first read-aloud/read-along of the model position paper introduces students to what the topic of essay is and helps prepare them to determine what argument or position the author presents.
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all students, especially supports challenged learners.

B. Understanding Expectations: Reading the Rubric (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have gotten a sense of the author's topic or content and the argument, they will look closely at the expectations for writing a strong position paper.
  • Direct students to their research folders, specifically the Position Paper Argument Rubric. Use the document camera to display the rubric. Explain that this rubric is very similar to ones they used in another module. Direct students' attention to the rubric displayed.
  • Remind students that a rubric is a guide that lists specific criteria for writing and evaluating academic papers, projects, or assessments.
  • Focus students on the Criteria column. Explain that the criteria listed in first three sections of that column are important for the work in today's lesson.
  • Call on a student to read the text under the heading "Claims and Reasons."
  • Point out that academic vocabulary is used in this explanation of how claims and reasons should be expressed or conveyed to readers. Explain that Levels 4 and 3 will help with understanding what that criteria means and how it is accomplished.
  • To increase understanding, invite students to look at the description of what well-written claims and reasons accomplish in the Level 4 column. Ask students to read along as you read aloud.
  • Circle or highlight on the displayed rubric: "compelling and follows logically from the task and purpose."
  • Invite students to highlight or circle the phrase "compelling and follows logically from the task and purpose" on their rubric as well.
  • Circle or highlight on the displayed rubric: "insightful analysis of the topic." Invite students to highlight or circle those words as well.
  • Remind students that the word analyze is a learning target word. Call on a student to define this word. Listen for a response that makes clear analyze involves taking apart a topic to understand it.
  • Ask students to discuss with their elbow partner the following questions:

* "What does 'introducing a topic and claim in a compelling way' mean?"

* "What does 'follow logically from the task and purpose' mean?"

  • Refocus students as a whole class. Cold call elbow partners to share their explanations. Listen for responses that clarify, such as:

* "A topic and claim should be introduced in a way that really interests the reader and is easy to make sense of."

* "When authors introduce a topic and claim, they should hook the readers in and interest them in their point of view or position."

  • Ask students to look closely at the descriptors for writing in Levels 4 and 3 with their elbow partners. Ask them to find two differences in the two levels and discuss what guidance that gives to writers. Call on volunteer partners to share. Responses should explain that Level 4 writing is compelling and convincing, which means that it gets the readers' attention, and Level 4 writing is insightful, which means it explains the topic and claim well.
  • Tell students that each of the criteria uses important academic vocabulary. Understanding the vocabulary is important for understanding how the rubric guides authors.
  • Refocus students as a whole class. Explain that they will now read along as you read aloud the "Command of Evidence" criteria and the "Coherence, Organization, and Style" criteria along with the descriptors for how to meet the criteria described in Levels 4 and 3. Encourage students to highlight or circle words and/or phrases that need defining. Ask them to notice differences between Levels 4 and 3.
  • Ask for volunteers to share what differences they noticed. For the "Command of Evidence" criteria, listen for responses that include well-chosen facts, concrete details, and varied evidence. For the "Coherence, Organization, and Style" criteria, listen for responses that include varied transitions, grade-appropriate vocabulary, stylistically sophisticated language, and a notable voice.
  • Commend students for their hard work and partnerships to analyze the rubric.
  • Explain that earlier in the lesson they read the "Hydraulic Fracturing" model position paper and determined the topic, the author's claim and reasons, and the argument. Now they will look at the article again with a partner to assess the writing by using the rubric.
  • Tell students who their pre-determined partners are.
  • Direct students to gather their "Hydraulic Fracturing" model position paper, Author's Presentation of Events graphic organizer, and Position Paper Argument Rubric.
  • Tell students that they will use the three criteria sections of the rubric that were read--"Claims and Reasons," "Command and Evidence" and "Coherence, Organization, and Style"--to assess the model position paper.
  • Ask partners to reread the model position paper together. Tell them to pause at the end of each paragraph and use the rubric to assess what they have read. Explain that the Author's Presentation of Events graphic organizer is a resource they can use to guide them as they evaluate.
  • Provide directions for students to use:

-   Use the "Claim and Reasons" criteria to assess the first paragraph.

-   Use the "Command of Evidence" criteria to assess Paragraphs 2, 3, and 4.

-   Finally, use the "Coherence, Organization, and Style" criteria to assess how the essay was organized and how language and vocabulary were used.

  • Ask partners to determine if the essay met Level 4 or Level 3 for each of the criteria they use. Tell students to provide at least two reasons that explain why or why not for each criterion, using the language of the rubric.
  • Refocus students as a whole class. Call on volunteer partners to share their assessment of the writing. Discuss any disagreements in student assessments.
  • Reward hard work; offer encouragement to keep these criteria in mind as students move forward with their own position paper writing.
  • Using a rubric to understand the expectations of writing a position paper helps students know what should be included and how information should be organized and expressed. It also helps students recognize what they understand and are prepared for and supports them in determining where they will need support in order to achieve proficiency with the learning targets.
  • Encourage students to highlight or circle words and/or phrases that are not clear. Provide dictionaries or resources to define unknown words.
  • Select students may benefit from having a word bank with definitions, or an alternative rubric written in more general terms.
  • Select students may benefit from working in a supported small group to assess the model position paper using the rubric.
  • When reading aloud the rubric criteria, it may be beneficial to rephrase using general vocabulary to help clarify the expectations.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: What Do You Think You Will Find Most Challenging in Writing a Paper Like This? (5 minutes)

  • Distribute an exit ticket to each student.
  • Tell students that as they prepare to use their research and personal claims, they should consider what is important in writing this type of paper. Remind them that today they have read a model position paper and looked closely at the rubric in order to understand what is involved with writing a paper like this. Now you want them to think about what they feel will be the most challenging in writing their own paper.
  • Give students a minute to consider what they feel will be most challenging in writing a paper like this. Ask students to clearly explain or convey in writing their challenge.
  • Students' responses to the exit ticket may help with grouping or partnering students for upcoming lessons. The responses might also help with planning support, modifications, or adaptations for select students.

Homework

Homework
  • Read to meet the 30-minute reading goal in your independent reading book. Complete the Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.

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