Researching Digital Sources, Part 2: Guided WebQuest | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U2:L8

Researching Digital Sources, Part 2: Guided WebQuest

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can conduct short research projects to answer a question. (W.6.7)
  • I can use several sources in my research. (W.6.7)
  • I can refocus or refine my question when appropriate. (W.6.7)
  • I can gather relevant information from a variety of sources. (W.6.8)
  • I can quote or paraphrase what others say about my topic while avoiding plagiarism. (W.6.8)
  • I can provide a list of sources I used to gather information in a bibliography. (W.6.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can choose digital resources that will help me answer my research question.  
  • I can gather relevant information from digital resources about my research question. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 19 (from homework)
  • Researcher's notebook

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Researching Digital Texts: WebQuest (30 minutes)

     B.  Mix and Mingle: Sharing Our Digital Learning (8 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

    A. Preparing for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

    A. Review your researcher's notebook and the Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizer to prepare for the tasks of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. 

  • This lesson is the second part of a two-part lesson in which students continue to research the question "Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?"
  • In  Lesson 7, students were introduced to a menu of Web sites from which they could choose.  They were guided through the process of choosing which Web site might be best in helping them find information they need, fill gaps in their research, or answer questions before they take a personal position about the use of DDT.
  • In this lesson, students continue researching digital sources. For some students, this may mean returning to the same Web site they visited in Lesson 7 because they did not finish the process of filling in their researcher's notebook. For other students, this means visiting a new Web site to complete the Source 5 section of their researcher's notebook.
  • In advance: In order to successfully complete this lesson, students will each need access to a computer. If technology is limited, consider pairing students at computers. 
  • In advance: Review Mix and Mingle, used in Work Time B. (See Appendix.)
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Researcher's notebook (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Digital Resources on DDT (from Lesson 7)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can choose digital resources that will help me answer my research question." 

* "I can gather relevant information from digital resources about my research question."

  • Because students focused on the first learning target in Lesson 7, tell them that today you would like to concentrate on the second learning target. 
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does relevant mean?"

* "Why is it important to find relevant information?"

  • Listen for: "Relevant means that the information is related to my research question, or is helpful in answering questions I still have. It's important to find relevant information because the purpose of this research is to answer questions that I have." Clarify as needed.

* "Now that you have seen the learning targets for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today? Why?"

  • Listen for: "We are going to continue reading articles on the internet, and searching for answers to our research question."
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, but helps challenged learners the most.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Researching Digital Texts: WebQuest (30 minutes)

  • Congratulate students on the great progress they made yesterday in transitioning from print to digital resources. Tell them that it's sometimes difficult to use the internet as a research tool, given the vast amount of information found there. That's why it's so important to have a targeted and specific question you are trying to answer.
  • Invite students to take out their researcher's notebook and refer to Source 4, where they collected information from digital sources in Lesson 7. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What is something new you learned in your WebQuest yesterday?"

  • Invite pairs to share a new piece of learning that they recorded in their notebooks.  Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What is a question you were left with that you would like to pursue today?"

  • Invite individual students to share a question to which they would like to find an answer. After a student has shared a question, ask the class to take out their Digital Resources on DDT from Lesson 7. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "Given the question we just heard, which Web site would be best to visit in search of an answer?"

  • Allow students to talk with a partner about which Web site on the list might have the answer. Invite volunteers to share which Web sites might be a good start, and what evidence from the Digital Resources on DDT page led them to this conclusion.
  • Tell students they will have the next 25 minutes to continue searching for answers to their questions about DDT. They should be writing in their researcher's notebook for Source 5.
  • Circulate and assist students with reading and technology, as well as with completing their writing in their researcher's notebook for Source 5. 
  • During Work Time A, you may want to pull a small group of students to support in finding evidence from the Web sites. Some students will need more guided practice before they are ready for independent work.
  • Consider printing Web site materials for those students who need the support of "pencil and paper" work where they can highlight, annotate, or chunk text.

B. Mix and Mingle: Sharing Our Digital Learning (8 minutes)

  • Tell students they will now do an activity called Mix and Mingle to share their learning and insights from their digital resources.
  • Remind students that this is especially important because they did not all read the same articles, as they pursued answers to their own individual questions. This means that information they hold in their researcher's notebooks may be helpful to their peers, who chose to read different resources. Similarly, someone may be hanging on to a piece of evidence that will be very helpful to students, so it's important to listen carefully as others share.
  • Tell students that before they mix and mingle they should place a star next to two or three pieces of information that they found especially interesting and helpful in answering their questions. They will share these pieces of evidence with their peers.
  • Give students 1 minute to identify the learning they'll share with their peers.
  • Give students 5 minutes to mix and mingle and share.
  • Invite students to return to their seats. Cold call a few students, as time permits, to share a new fact they learned by listening.
  • Give students specific positive feedback on their cooperative learning and active listening. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Preparing for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Once students are seated, remind them that in the next lesson they will complete their mid-unit assessment.
  • Remind students that they will be reading two new articles about DDT for the mid-unit assessment. They will then complete a research page identical to a page from their researcher's notebook to show they understand how to collect information about sources, paraphrase information in answer to their research question, and collect important facts and details. They will also show how they can compare and contrast two authors' presentations of ideas and information. To do this, they will complete a Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentations graphic organizer, identical to the ones they used during previous lessons.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What questions or worries do you still have about our assessment in the next lesson?"

  • Invite students to share, as needed, their questions. Clarify any and all points, ensuring students feel confident about participating in this assessment. 
  • Consider displaying for students the page from the researcher's notebook and the Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizer. Seeing this document will allow students to mentally prepare for the task they complete in the mid-unit assessment. 

Homework

Homework
  • Review your researcher's notebook and the Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizer to prepare for the tasks of the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. 

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