Presentation of Events: Comparing Two Authors | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U2:L6

Presentation of Events: Comparing Two Authors

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph: a word's position or function in a sentence) to determine meaning of a word or phrase. (L.6.4a)
  • I can compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person). (RI.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • I can compare and contrast two authors' presentation of events.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 17 (from homework)
  • Research Vocabulary using context clues
  • Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (8 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Context Clues: Reviewing Using Context Clues to Determine Word Meaning (10 minutes)

     B.  Comparing Two Authors' Presentation of Events (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Last Words: Any New/Interesting Ideas on Benefits and/or Consequences of Using DDT (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Read Chapter 18: "The Earth Calls Frightful" and complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 18.

  • In previous lessons, students used affixes, dictionaries, and thesauruses to determine word meaning. In today's lesson, students learn context clue strategies to increase knowledge and skills for expanding vocabulary and improving understanding of texts they read.
  • Using context clues is a great way to figure out the meaning of a word. Learning basic strategies helps to find and use clues.
  • In today's lesson, student read two articles from different authors that provide additional information about DDT. Students look closely at how the authors introduce their positions and use evidence and text features to support ideas. Students must compare and contrast different authors' presentation of information.
  • The article "A New Home for DDT" is at a challenging Lexile measure for sixth graders. If necessary to support your students, consider excerpting this article further, keeping in mind that students are looking for how the author introduces the article, what evidence the author includes, and if there are any text features employed to support the argument.
  • After reading and comparing and contrasting two articles, students must reflect on any new information presented and how that affects their own thoughts about the benefits and consequences of DDT.
  • In advance: Read the articles for comparing and contrasting two different authors' presentation of information about DDT: "Biological Energy--Here, Let Me Fix It!" and "A New Home for DDT."
  • Post: Learning targets. 

Vocabulary

context, compare, contrast

Materials

  • Research folder (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Research Vocabulary graphic organizer (from Lesson 4; in research folder)
  • Context Clues Resource
  • Document camera
  • Using Context Clues practice sheet
  • Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentations graphic organizer (one per student)
  • "Biological Energy--Here, Let Me Fix It!" article (one per student; in research folder)
  • "A New Home for DDT" article (one per student; in research folder)
  • Authors' Presentation of Ideas anchor chart(begun in Lesson 3) 
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 18 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A.Engaging the Reader: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to join their triads and share their responses to the Learning from Frightful's Perspective focus question for Chapter 18: "The Earth Calls Frightful."

* "Who were the people on Hook Mountain? Why did they cheer when Frightful flew over?"

  • Encourage students to use details or evidence that supports their response.
  • Tell students to share vocabulary words they added to their "Words I Found Difficult" list with their triad partners. Remind each group member to share words they have selected and the meaning. Add the page number it was found on and a brief definition of the word. Encourage triad members to collaborate to determine the meaning of the words.
  • Circulate and listen to gauge students' responses to the focus question. Commend students for using details and evidence to support their focus question responses. Recognize students for determining meaning of new words.
  • Guide students needing support in responding to focus questions and defining words.
  • Refocus triads whole group. Call on students to share their triad's responses to the focus question. Listen for ideas and details or evidence such as:

-   "The people on Hook Mountain were men and women who came in the fall to count birds of prey when they were flying on their migration route. The people came every year to see if the birds were surviving."

-   "The people on Hook Mountain counted migrating birds of prey each year. This helped them learn if banning pesticides and laws that protected the birds were working."

-   "The people on Hook Mountain cheered because they saw Frightful fly over. It was a thrill to see a peregrine falcon because they are a rare sight."

  • Recognize students for using details or evidence to express their answers. 
  • In advance, consider selecting students who benefit from reading or participation support to circle or highlight the important words on today's learning targets.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite two students to each lead the class as they all read the learning targets aloud:

* "I can use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words."

* "I can compare and contrast two authors' presentation of events."

  • Ask students to look closely at the posted learning targets to identify three important words. Listen for responses that include: context, compare, and contrast. Invite students to circle those words on the posted learning targets. Share the meaning of each of the words:

 * "Context--other words and sentences that are around a new word."

 * "Compare--to say that (something) is similar to something else."

 * "Contrast--to compare two things to show how they are different."

  • Thank students for leading the reading of the targets and identifying the important words.
  • Explain that using context clues to learn word meanings is an important part of understanding what they read. Tell students today they'll work with context clues to solve the mystery of unknown words.
  • Inform students they will also compare and contrast the DDT article they read in the last lesson with a new article. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Context Clues: Reviewing Using Context Clues to Determine Word Meaning (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the past few lessons they've been learning and using different strategies to determine word meaning. To do this, they have been using affixes, which include both prefixes and suffixes, and resources such as dictionaries and thesauruses.
  • Today they will add to those strategies by using context clues to figure out the meaning of a word.
  • Explain that context is other words and sentences that are around or near the new word. These are hints or clues that help you determine the meaning of an unknown word. When you use context clues you are making an informed guess.
  • Authors provide clues in different ways. Those strategies include definitions, synonyms, and antonyms.
  • Inform students they will use those strategies to find context clues and determine the meaning of a word.
  • Form student partnerships.
  • Ask students to go into their research folder and bring out their Research Vocabulary graphic organizer.
  • Ask students to also find their Context Clues Resource in their research folder.  Use a document camera to display the Context Clues Resource.
  • Introduce context clue strategies that help determine the meaning of a word. Distribute the Using Context Cluespractice sheet, using the document camera to display the practice sheet and introduce instructions.
  • Tell students to think-pair-share as they identify a different context clue used in each passage. Ask them to read each passage to themselves. Tell students to look carefully for different types of clues. Ask students to share the clues they identified with their partner and the definitions for the words. Record the clues and meanings of the highlighted words.
  • Circulate to observe and support students needing help identifying clues and using them to determine word meanings.
  • Refocus students whole group. Ask them to look at the word environmentalist on their Research Vocabulary graphic organizer. Tell student to compare the meaning of environmentalist they identified using context clues with the definition they found in the dictionary and by using affixes.
  • Call on students to share the meaning/meanings they found using different strategies.
  • Ask students to look at the question on third column: "What strategy helped you determine meaning?" Ask students to write which of the strategies were helpful. Suggest they record all of the strategies that were helpful.
  • Commend students for using different types of context clues to search for word meaning. Explain that all of the strategies are helpful in building their vocabulary skills and strengthening their reading for claims and evidence. Tell students they can practice these vocabulary strategies as they compare and contrast how two different authors present their information.
  • Some students may benefit from using definitions and synonyms to find the meaning of new words.
  • Students may benefit from rereading to increase understanding and find context clues.

B. Comparing Two Authors' Presentation of Events (20 minutes)

  • Direct students to open the research folders to their Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizers.
  • Ask students to also take two articles from their research folder titled "Biological Energy--Here, Let Me Fix It!" and "A New Home for DDT."
  • Use a document camera. Focus students' attention on the columns on the Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizer called Text 1 and Text 2.
  • Remind students that they selected one of the articles to read in the last lesson. The title of that article should be written under Text 1. The other title, which they will read today, should be written under Text 2.
  • Explain that in this lesson, first they will reread the article they have already read to identify how the author presented information.
  • Use the document camera to point out three different ways authors present information that students will identify as they read. Those include:

* "How does the author introduce the article?"

* "What type of evidence does the author include?"

* "How does the author use text features (photographs, graphs, diagrams, etc.)?"

  • Use the document camera to review strategies authors use to introduce and use evidence and text features with the Authors' Presentation of Ideas anchor chart (from Lesson 3). 
  • Tell students they will have about 8 minutes to read and respond to the questions for each article. Suggest that students complete reading in about 3 minutes to allow time to find and record the information that identifies the way the authors present information.
  • When students have finished reading both articles and documenting how the authors presented information, they should compare how the articles were similar and how they were different. Allow students 4 minutes to compare and contrast the presentation strategies.
  • Circulate and observe to gauge how well students are doing with reading and identifying the authors' presentation.
  • Remind students when it is time to begin reading and assessing the other article.
  • Give students specific positive praise on at least two strengths. Suggest one goal for strengthening.
  • Consider supporting a small group of students in reading the articles and identifying how authors presented their information. 
  • Some students may need more guided practice with comparing and contrasting authors' presentations of ideas and information before they are ready for independent work.
  • Consider providing alternative articles to some students.
  • Students may benefit from reviewing the Authors' Presentation of Events anchor chart before reading the articles and completing the Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizer.
  • Some students may benefit from using the using the Authors' Presentation of Events anchor chart as they read the articles and compare and contrast.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Last Words: Any New/Interesting Ideas on Benefits and/or Consequences of Using DDT (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn and talk with a partner to share which article they thought was more effective in presenting information and why.
  • Tell students to identify at least one new or interesting idea they learned on the benefits and/or consequences of using DDT and write that idea at the bottom of the Comparing and Contrasting Authors' Presentation graphic organizer.
  • Remind students to put their graphic organizer and the two articles in their research folders. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 18: "The Earth Calls Frightful" and complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 18.

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