Presenting a Research-Based Claim Visual Aid and Peer Critique | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U2:L14

Presenting a Research-Based Claim Visual Aid and Peer Critique

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can include multimedia components and visual displays in a presentation to clarify information. (SL.6.5)
  • I can use effective speaking techniques (appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation). (SL.6.4)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when indicated or appropriate. (SL.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can create a visual that clarifies information in my presentation.
  • I can participate in a peer critique of my presentation.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Visual aid for presentation
  • Presentation notecards
  • Presenting a Claim and Findings Peer Critique form

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Creating a Visual (20 minutes)  

     B.  Good Speaking Techniques: Partner Practice (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: Preparing for My Presentation (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Prepare for the End of Unit 2 Assessment. Finish the visual and practice the presentation.

  • In Lesson 13, students started to prepare for their End of Unit 2 Assessment. They were asked to consider each of their visuals, the Cascading Consequences chart or the Stakeholders Impacts chart and select one that would help clarify their claim and best represent their position. Students also participated in a Peer Critique of their claim and findings. After the critique, time was given to make revisions. To model how to advocate persuasively, students observed good speaking techniques by analyzing a video of a 12-year-old student of ECO, the Environmental Children's Organization. Together, students identified criteria of good speaking techniques and developed a checklist of criteria.
  • In today's lesson, students continue preparing for their presentations. This lesson focuses on creating a visual aid to support the claim and findings, preparing their notecards for the presentation, and practicing their presentation with a peer.
  • Viewing the video and creating their visual aid will help students understand how the use of their visual aid, coupled with good speaking skills, work hand-in-hand to create an effective presentation.
  • In this lesson, students continue to work on notecards that include their claim, three pieces of relevant and supporting evidence, and information about their reasoning and point of view for their presentations. Students will be asked to put their evidence in a logical order, considering each piece of evidence so that they can advocate persuasively their position on DDT.
  • Students partner with a peer to practice presentations and effective speaking techniques. Working with peers helps develop their skills. As presenters, they practice and improve the criteria they are being assessed on. As listeners, they build on their understanding of the criteria, allowing them to improve their own presentation.
  •  In Lesson 15, students will present their positions on DDT and the balance of human needs and the condition of the natural world. They will share their claim and supporting evidence to peers in a hosted Gallery Walk as an End of Unit 2 Assessment.
  • In advance: Form student partnerships. Students will present their position to a peer.
  • Post: Learning targets and the two guiding questions: "Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?" and "How do we balance the needs of humans with the conditions of the natural world?"

Vocabulary

visual, clarify, peer critique, logical

Materials

  • Stakeholders Impacts Chart (from Lesson 11; in research folder)
  • Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart (from Unit 1; in research folder)
  • Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart (from Unit 1; in research folder)
  • Research folder
  • Task Card for Creating a Visual Aid (one per student)
  • Plain white paper (one piece per student)
  • Document camera
  • A Visual to Support My Claim (one for display)
  • Black fine-tip marker (one per student)
  • Ruler (one per student)
  • Compass (one per student)
  • Box of colored pencils (one per student)
  • Criteria for the Cascading Consequences Chart Visual (one per student)
  • Criteria for the Stakeholders Impacts Chart Visual (one per student)
  • Notecards (four per student)
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 12; in research folder)
  • Presenting a Claim and Findings Criteria Peer Critique (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Preparing for My Presentation (one per student; one for display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets  (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read along with you as you read the learning targets aloud:

* "I can create a visual that clarifies information in my presentation."

* "I can participate in a peer critique of my presentation."

  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "What is a visual, and how can a visual help clarify information?" 

* "Can you think of visuals you have created in Units 1 and Unit 2?"

  • Pause to give students time.
  • Cold call triads and listen for: A visual is something that enhances a presentation; it creates an image for the audience to view. A visual helps explain information in a different manner and highlights the content of the presentation. The Cascading Consequences charts and the Stakeholders Impacts chart are examples of visuals created in Unit 1 and Unit 2.
  • Explain that in this lesson, students will create their own visual for their presentation.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "What is a peer critique?" 

* "Why is this an important step in the process of preparing for a presentation?"

  •  Pause to give triads time to discuss.
  • Cold call and listen for: A peer critique is when a peer or classmate provides feedback on something. This step is important because it gives the presenter an opportunity to make changes and improve his/her presentation.
  • Remind students that working with peers will help develop both the presenter's and the listener's skills. Tell students their primary audience for this activity will be their peers. Therefore, this is a really great chance to practice before their assessment. As presenters, they practice and improve criteria they are being assessed on. As listeners, they build on their understanding of the criteria allowing them to makes changes improve their own presentations. 
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check students' understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Creating a Visual (20 minutes)

  • Explain that effective presentations have visuals to clarify information. Share that a visual provides an image and will increase the audience's level of understanding of the material. When visuals are used, it encourages the presenter to use gestures and movement during the presentation. As a result, visuals are mutually beneficial to both the audience and the presenter.
  • Invite students to find their Stakeholders Impacts chartBenefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart,and Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart in their research folder.
  • Distribute the Task Card for Creating a Visual Aid and plain white paper.  Read through the instructions on the task card for creating each visual.
  • Using a document camera, display the model: A Visual to Support My Claim. Share with students they will choose either their Cascading Consequences chart as their visual or their Stakeholders Impacts chart. If they choose to use their Cascading Consequences chart as the visual, they need to select one aspect that will best highlight and support their claim.  Explain the example could serve as a model. Tell them if they choose the Stakeholders Impacts chart, they need to select the part that best represents their position and draw that part of the chart and include text headings for clarity.
  • Distribute other supplies as needed to each student such as a black fine-tip marker to highlight all pencil marks, a ruler to construct draft lines, a compass for the claim circle, and a box of colored pencils to lightly shade the background of text to draw attention to important information. Tell students they will have 20 minutes to work on their visuals.
  • Circulate and support students needing help with choosing the best visual to clarify their claim.
  • Refocus the class.
  • Distribute either the Criteria for the Cascading Consequences Chart Visual or the Criteria for the Stakeholders Impacts Chart Visual. Ask students to use the Checklist Criteria to help determine their next steps.
  • Commend students for all they accomplished in the time given. Point out highlights of their visuals such as neat writing, using draft lines, and the spacing of images for page layout.

B.  Good Speaking Techniques: Partner Practice (20 minutes)

  • Form student partnerships.
  • Point out an effective presentation has visual aids and establishes an objective or an end goal. Ask partners to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What is the objective or end goal of your presentation?"

  • Call on volunteers. Listen for: Our goal is to inform our audience about DDT issues by sharing facts and details.
  • Explain that they are also asking the audience to consider adopting a new perspective on the use of DDT after hearing their facts and listening to their supporting details. Remind students they are using their research to advocate persuasively on their position.
  • Invite students to take out the notecards from Lesson 13.   They will now have time to complete any they may have left unfinished.  Ask students to find the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer in their research folder.
  • Remind students to think about the two questions written at the top of this organizer: "Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?" and "How do we balance the needs of humans with the condition of the natural world?" Ask them to carefully consider how to advocate persuasively as they complete their four notecards. Remind students that the first notecard will state their claim, and each of the other three notecards should have a supporting piece of evidence and their reasoning about the supporting information. Explain students should also cite the source of their evidence. 
  • Tell students they have 5 minutes to complete their notecards, and then they will have their first opportunity to share their position and get partner feedback.
  • Circulate and support students needing help with transferring their claim and evidence onto notecards. Compliment students for being productive.
  • Refocus the class after 5 minutes. Distribute Presenting a Claim and Findings Criteria Peer Critique form to students.
  • Using a document camera, display the Peer Critique form. Invite students to read along as you read the criteria list aloud.
  • Explain each of the criteria so students understand how they will be assessed. Invite students to think about the order in which they present their evidence. Ask them to think about a logical order, an order that seems reasonable. Explain sometimes it's best to put the most important piece of evidence last.
  • Give students a few minutes to prepare. Circulate to support.
  • Ask the partners to determine who should present first. Remind listeners to be supportive and provide stars and a wish or next step to the presenter.
  • As students present, circulate and take notes on the criteria students are meeting successfully and on the criteria needing attention.
  • Reconvene the class after partners have finished. Ask partners to finish completing the peer critique and give it to their partner.
  • Using the document camera, display the Presenting a Claim and Findings Criteria Peer Critique form. Point out criteria you observed students doing successfully and criteria students may want to focus on for their hosted Gallery Walk.
  • Commend students for their focused work preparing for their End of Unit 2 Assessment. Share that it will be exciting to see all of their research presented in the hosted Gallery Walk. 
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all students, especially challenged learners.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A.  Exit Ticket: Preparing for My Presentation (3 minutes)

  • Read the two guiding questions to the class: "Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?" and "How do we balance the needs humans with the conditions of the natural world?" Ask students to think about these questions and the goal of their presentation.
  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: Preparing for My Presentation. Invite students to think about the learning targets and about presenting their position persuasively to peers. Ask them what they need to accomplish to be prepared for the Gallery Walk.

Homework

Homework
  • Prepare for the End of Unit 2 Assessment. Finish the visual and notecards, and practice the presentation.

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