Presenting a Research-Based Claim: Effective Speaking Techniques | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U2:L13

Presenting a Research-Based Claim: Effective Speaking Techniques

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use effective speaking techniques (appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation). (SL.6.4)
  • I can present claims and findings in a logical order. (SL.6.4)
  • I can support my main points with description, facts, and details. (SL.6.4)
  • I can include multimedia components and visual displays in a presentation to clarify information. (SL.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can choose a visual aid that supports my claim and findings.
  • I can identify the qualities of good speaking.
  • I can use feedback from my teacher and peers to revise my claim and findings.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Visual Aid selected to support personal claim
  • Claim and Findings revision
  • Video Critique

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

     B.  Choosing a Visual: What Part of My Cascading Consequences Charts or Stakeholders Impacts Chart Best Represents My Claims? (10 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Revising the Claim and Findings (15 minutes)

     B.  Effective Speaking Techniques: Video Presentation and Critique (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: Share Listener Feedback Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

    A.  Read your independent book for 30 minutes. Add to the Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.

  • At this point, students have completed the drafts of their personal claims or positions. Students' personal thoughts about the effects of DDT in our environment are influenced by their research and the claims and evidence that different authors shared. Students have selected evidence such as descriptions, facts, and details from other authors to support their personal position in their drafts. Students have identified their personal claim and are now ready to prepare for their presentation.
  • In advance: Create a target image to use as they unpack today's learning targets. Prepare quarter- or half-size pieces of paper for goal setting, sharing, and tossing.
  • In this lesson, students work with partners to revise their drafts. With specific guidelines on editing and critiquing, students use partner interaction to help achieve clear, logical, descriptive claims. Before partners begin, provide feedback from your review of students' drafts. Guide students with detailed revision critique suggestions.
  • In advance: Review student drafts to identify criteria they can strengthen. Look for:

-   At least three details that can be turned into personal positions,

-   Position is expressed in the form of a personal position or "I believe ..." statement.

-   Each detail relates to and supports the claim.

  • In this lesson, students observe a model of good speaking techniques by watching a video of a 12-year-old girl speaking to the United Nations Conference about concerns that some children who participate in ECO, the Environmental Children's Organization, have about the environment and the development of children.
  • In advance: Watch the video, The Best Speech--Severn Suzuki, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPx5r35Aymc. Look for speaking techniques such as eye contact, volume, word pronunciation, appropriate vocabulary, and visual aids used by the presenter. Listen for the speaker's possible position and information used to support that idea.

Vocabulary

visual aid, critique, academic and domain-specific vocabulary, formal English

Materials

  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Half- or quarter-size sheets of paper (one per student)
  • Image of a target (one copy, large enough to see clearly and serve as a target to toss at)
  • Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart (from Unit 1; in research folder)
  • Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart (from Unit 1; in research folder)
  • Stakeholders Impacts chart (from Lesson 11; in research folder)
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 12)
  • Self and Peer Critique graphic organizer (one per student; to place in research folder)
  • Checklist for Forming an Evidence-Based Claim (from Lesson 12)
  • Document camera
  • Notecards (four per student)
  • Video--"The Best Speech--Severn Suzuki" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPx5r35Aymc
  • Tune in to Good Speaking: Video Critique graphic organizer (one per student and one for display; in research folder)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Have the learning targets posted where all students can see them.
  • Direct students to stand in a circle.
  • Tell students to pick up a pencil and half- or quarter-size piece of paper as they take a place in the circle.
  • Have an image of a target placed on the floor in the center of the circle. The image could be on paper, a dry-erase board, poster board, or cardboard.
  • Invite students to look at and read the learning targets aloud with you.

* "I can choose a visual aid that supports my claim and findings."

* "I can identify the qualities of good speaking."

* "I can use feedback from my teacher and peers to revise my claim and findings."

  • Explain that these targets are important goals as they prepare to share their personal claims and findings--along with a visual aid--about the use of DDT with a listening audience for their End of Unit 2 Assessment.
  • Tell students to look closely at the targets and choose one or all of the targets toward which they would like to aim.
  • Ask students to write key words, or main words, they notice in those targets that identify their goals or what they feel is important to work on. Explain that key words include "visual aid," "good speaking," and/or "revise my claim and findings."
  • Tell students to write their key word or words on their paper and fold the paper into a small square to be tossed at the target.
  • Ask for a volunteer to be the first to share their target goal as they make their toss at the target. Go around the circle and have each student share their goal and toss.
  • Remind students that when you know where you are headed and you follow that path, you can reach your destination successfully.
  • Some students may benefit from working in small groups as they select an appropriate chart that supports their claim and can be used to develop a visual aid.

B. Choosing a Visual: What Part of My Cascading Consequences Charts or Stakeholders Impacts Chart Best Represents My Claims? (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that a visual aid is something the audience can look at to understand something. The visual aid is part of the presentation they will make to share their personal claim and the findings that support it. The visual aid helps explain their research-based claim to their audience.
  • Explain that the Cascading Consequences chart that supports their claim (either the Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart or the Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart and/or the Stakeholders Impacts chart can be used to develop their visual display).
  • Tell students they will select the chart that has information that best supports their personal claim.
  • Ask students to gather the following items from their research folder:

*   Cascading Consequences chart that supports their claim (either the "Benefits of DDT" or the "Harmful Consequences of DDT")

*   Stakeholders Impacts chart

  • Distribute the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer drafts from the last lesson to each student or ask students to retrieve them from their research folder.
  • Use a Think-Pair-Share to help students select the chart and information they will use to create their visual aid in the next lesson.
  • Ask students to take 1 minute to reread the draft they wrote on their own of their personal claim and findings.
  • When they finish reading, students should look at their selected Cascading Consequences chart and their Stakeholders Impacts chart and choose information that helps explain information in their presentation to their audience. Encourage students to look closely for information that relates well to their personal claim and can help listeners understand their message.
  • Tell students to share both their claim and the visual they selected with their partner. Ask partners to explain their reason for choosing their visual. Their explanation should include information on the chart and how it relates to their personal claim. Invite listening partners to provide feedback.
  • Circulate to support students as they make their selections.
  • Refocus the whole class and cold call a few partners to share whole group the visual and the reason for choosing it.
  • Commend students for selecting a chart and information that relates to their claim. Explain that they will use that to create their visual aid in the next lesson.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Revising the Claim and Findings (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the last lesson, they drafted their personal claim and findings in their Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer. They shared their claims and findings or evidence with their peers in a Concentric Circle and then revised and wrote their claim at the bottom of the graphic organizer in the Making a Claim section.
  • Tell students that today they will review and revise their claim and findings again. As they work towards achieving their best work, point out the following steps they will take:

1. Review and revise their own personal claim and findings.

2. Critique their writing partner's personal claim and findings.

3. Document their personal claim and findings on notecards to use for their presentation.

  • Ask students to get their Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer from their research folder.
  • Distribute the Self and Peer Critique graphic organizer to each student. Ask students to also get their Checklist for Forming an Evidence-Based Claim (from Lesson 12) from their research folder.
  • Use the document camera to introduce the Self and Peer Critique graphic organizer. Point out the writer's claim and findings components on the graphic organizer that students should look for as they critique, or evaluate carefully, to give feedback. Recommend that students also refer to the Checklist for Forming an Evidence-Based Claimto help them critique and revise their own work. This will also help when they critique their partner's work.
  • Determine writing partners.
  • Tell students they have 2 minutes to review their drafts and make changes.
  • Students then exchange drafts with their writing partners. Give students the next 6 minutes to carefully read their partner's claim and provide helpful feedback on the Self and Peer Critiquegraphic organizer.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. Provide support and directions as needed.
  • Refocus class whole group. Thank students for their close look at their own writing and their partner's writing. Explain that they will now use their revised claims and finding to create notecards to use when they present their personal claim and supporting findings.
  • Distribute four notecards to each student. Explain that they will now write their claim on a notecard and each of the three pieces of evidence on separate notecards. Tell students they may use their notecards for reference when they present to their audience.
  • Instruct students that the first notecard expresses their personal claim. That can be written as a sentence that clearly presents their issue and point of view. The other three notecards can be notes that they can refer to as they present and refer to their visual aid.
  • Allow students the next 8 minutes to work independently to create their notecards.
  • Refocus the group. Explain that their well-written claims and findings is an important part of sharing their position with an audience. Tell students another important part of a presentation is speaking. 
  • Asking students to provide feedback to their peers helps them clarify and strengthen their writing.
  • Consider providing students with several ways to start personal statements that express their claims.
  • Consider providing examples of notecards to guide students as they create their own.

B. Effective Speaking Techniques: Video Presentation and Critique (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they are now going to watch a Video--"The Best Speech--Severn Suzuki" in which a 12-year-old girl named Severn Suzuki gives a presentation. She is a member of the Environmental Children's Organization speaking to a group of adults at the United Nations Conference on the environment and development. Explain that she expresses her concerns about children losing important things in the environment and how that will affect their futures (her claim).
  • Before starting the video, ask students to look at the criteria in the left column of the Tune in to Good Speaking: Video Critique graphic organizer in their research folder.
  • Use a document camera to display the graphic organizer and point out the criteria, or standards that a presentation may be judged on.
  • Inform students that these are the same criteria they will strive for in their presentations.
  • Review the first five criteria listed as students follow along:

*  "The speaker makes eye contact with the audience."

*  "The speaker uses appropriate volume."

*  "The speaker clearly pronounces and expresses words."

* "The speaker includes visual aids or displays that clarify information in the presentation."

 * "The speaker uses formal English: Academic and domain-specific vocabulary; language that expresses ideas precisely, eliminating wordiness and redundancy."

  • Ask students to watch and listen for those speaking techniques. Explain that it is helpful to hear and observe others when preparing to speak to an audience.
  • As they watch, tell students to write their critique or feedback comments in the right-hand column by the criteria that they notice on the graphic organizer. Feedback should be specific.
  • Play the first 2 to 3 minutes of the video. Pause and ask students to share what they noticed. Probe for responses that address the presentation criteria such as:

 * "What did you notice about the girl's voice?"

 * "How would you describe her eye contact with her audience?"

*  What 'formal English' did you notice?"

* "How did she pronounce her words?"

* "What visual aids did you notice? How were they helpful?"

  • Remind students to write their feedback on the Tune in to Good Speaking: Video Critique graphic organizer.
  • Before watching the rest of the video, ask students to also watch for how information is presented. Listen to see if information is clearly presented in a logical order and includes descriptions, facts, and details.
  • Ask students to refer to their Tune in to Good Speaking: Video Critique graphic organizer to critique the girl's presentation.
  • At the end of the video, recognize students' attentive listening and critique work. Explain that they will now share their observations with others.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket: Share Listener Feedback Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to take their Video Critiques and form two equal lines and stand across from each other.
  • Explain that their partner is the person standing across from them. Instruct students to turn around so they are facing away from each other. As they are facing away, ask students to select two critique comments they included in their listener feedback to share with their partner. Ask students to also think of one goal they have for their own presentation. Allow 1 minute to think of what they would like to share.
  • Invite students to turn around, face their partner, and share their critique comments and their goal.
  • Collect students' Video Critiques as their exit ticket. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read your independent book for 30 minutes. Add to the Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.

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