Mid-Unit Assessment: Tracing an Argument in an Article and a Video | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U1:L8

Mid-Unit Assessment: Tracing an Argument in an Article and a Video

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.6.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims for sufficient evidence. (SL.6.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a video about DDT.
  • I can evaluate the evidence used to support the argument and claims in a video about DDT.
  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution."
  • I can evaluate the evidence used to support the argument and claims in "Rachel Carson: sounding the Alarm on Pollution."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: Video about DDT
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution"

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A.  Unpacking Learning Targets and Assessment Prompt (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A.  Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: Video about DDT (17 minutes)

     B.  Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Vocabulary: Adding Words to the Scientific Word Wall (3 minutes).

4. Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 8, "Hunger Is Frightful's Teacher." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 8.

  • The Mid-Unit 1 Assessment spans multiple standards and uses both a text and a video. If necessary, or beneficial, consider spreading this assessment across two lessons.
  • The questions and graphic organizers in this assessment closely parallel the types of questions and graphic organizers that students worked on in earlier lessons.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperating services providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment. Consider students who need testing accommodations: extra time, separate location, scribe, etc.
  • If students finish their Mid-Unit 1 Assessment early, ask them to catch up on their reading in Frightful's Mountain or work on their vocabulary.
  • In advance:
  • Prepare a computer and projector, or multiple computers, for the video component of this assessment.
  • Post: Learning targets

Vocabulary

argument, claims, evidence; bio-magnification, bio-accumulation (video); pollution, conservation, synthetic, aerial (article)

Materials

  • Document camera
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: Video about DDT (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment Glossary sheet (one per student)
  • Video about DDT:  http://www.science.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=en&n=730d78b4-1
  • "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" article (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (a few per student)
  • Scientific Word Wall (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Frightful's Mountain (book; one per student)
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 8

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets and Assessment Prompt (5 minutes)

  • Post the learning targets.
  • Invite student volunteers to read aloud each target, one at a time, as the other students read along. After each target is read, ask the students:

* "What are the important words in this target?"

  • Look for responses that identify the words: argument, claims, and evidence. Use a highlighter to emphasize those important words as the students identify them.
  • Write the number 1 by the word argument, 2 by the word claims, and 3 by the word evidence.
  • Tell students that you will share a definition for each of those words. When they hear and see the definition, they should raise one finger if the definition is for an argument, two fingers for claims, and three fingers for evidence.
  • Use the document camera to show the definitions as you read them aloud.
  • Explain that ________is information that helps show that something is true or helps prove something. (evidence)
  • Explain that a _______ states that something is true or is a fact. (claim)
  • Explain an ________is a statement or series of statements for or against something. (argument)
  • As students see and hear the definitions, ask them to raise one, two, or three fingers to match the definition with the important words from the targets they'll use in their assessment today
  • Remind students that they have been working for several lessons on identify arguments and claims, and evaluating the evidence that supports them. Today is a chance for them to use those skills as they watch and listen to a new video and to read a new article.
  • Consider partnering ELLs who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: Video about DDT (17 minutes

  • Distribute the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: Video about DDT as well as the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment Glossary. Tell students that the video they are about to watch and the article they are about to read contain some new vocabulary they may find difficult, and this glossary should be used as a tool to help them understand these materials
  • Tell students that the assessment is similar to the work they have been doing using the Tracing an Argument graphic organizer. Today, they will identify arguments in both a video and an article. They will also identify claims and evidence that supports the claims in both.
  • Explain that the video about DDT (http://www.science.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=en&n=730d78b4-1)lasts about 4 minutes.
  • Tell students they will watch the video twice: once to get the gist and to identify the argument. Explain that they will have a couple of minutes after watching the video to write down the speaker's argument if they are ready to do that.
  • They will watch the video a second time more closely for specific claims and evaluate the evidence used to support the argument and claims. Explain that they will have about 5 minutes to write one of the speaker's claims, evidence that supports the claim, and explain if the evidence is sufficient.
  • Tell the students that there are also two multiple-choice questions that they will answer. Invite students to read the questions before watching the video the second time.
  • Circulate and support students as they work on their assessments.
  • Collect this portion of the assessment.
  • For students who struggle with reading grade-level text, consider chunking the text or identifying a section of the "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" article that states a claim and has supporting evidence. The Lexile measure of this article is 840. The "Deadly Chemicals" section and the "Thousands of Dead Fish" section contain claims and evidence.
  • To support ELL students, consider providing definitions of challenging vocabulary in the students' home language. Translate; bilingual transition digital and textual dictionaries can assist with one-word translation.
  • Some students may benefit from extra time to complete the mid-unit assessment.
  • Some students may benefit from pausing the video to write responses on the mid-unit assessment.
  • Some students may benefit from listening to the video more than twice.

B. Mid-Unit Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" (20 minutes)

  • Distribute the assessment text "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" and the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution."
  • Tell students they will read the article for the gist and identify the argument.
  • Explain that they do not need to read the entire article. Tell students they may stop reading when they get to the heading "A Writer at Age 10."
  • Tell students they will also identify a claim and evidence that supports the claims.
  • Explain that rereading helps identify claims and find evidence.
  • Give students the list of scientific words that are used in the article and their definitions. They may use this to help with understanding.
  • Circulate and support students as they work on their assessments.
  • Invite those who finish the assessment to write the scientific words on sticky notes to add to the Scientific Word Wall during closing time. They should identify which category the words would best fit with.
  • Students may also read Frightful's Mountain if they are finished.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Vocabulary: Adding Words to the Scientific Word Wall (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to share under which categories on the Scientific Word Wall the new vocabulary words used in the assessment would fit.
  • Call on students who finished their assessment and had time to add the words to sticky notes. Invite those students to place those words in the category under which they fit.
  • Commend students for their hard work on the mid-unit assessment. Explain that independently using the skills of identifying arguments, claims, and supporting evidence is an important step in the work they will be starting.
  • Distribute and review Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 8.

Homework

HomeworkMeeting Students' Needs
  • Read Chapter 8, "Hunger Is Frightful's Teacher." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 8.
  • Teaching Note: In Lesson 9, students will need their Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapters 1-8 Focus Question Responses (specifically for Chapters 2, 4, 5, and 7). Help students locate these materials in advance, or assign this organization of their materials to be part of their homework task.
  • Consider giving some students filled-in Tracing an Argument graphic organizers from "Double Whammy" and "Public Fear" to review for the mid-unit assessment.

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