Annotating the Text and Identifying Argument, Claims, and Evidence: “Double Whammy” Excerpt from “The Exterminator” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U1:L5

Annotating the Text and Identifying Argument, Claims, and Evidence: “Double Whammy” Excerpt from “The Exterminator”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.6.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims for sufficient evidence. (RI.6.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can get the gist of an excerpt from "The Exterminator."
  • I can identify the argument, claims, and evidence in an excerpt from "The Exterminator."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 5 (from homework)
  • Tracing an Argument graphic organizer
  • Exit Ticket: Argument, Claims, and Evidence

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Studying Peregrine Falcon Migration Map (15 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Getting the Gist: "Double Whammy" Excerpt from "The Exterminator" (10 minutes)

     B.  Identifying the Argument, Claims, and Evidence in "Double Whammy" Excerpt from "The Exterminator"(15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: Finding the Claim and Supporting Evidence in an Excerpt from "The Exterminator"(3 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 6, "Frightful Finds the  Enemy." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 6.

  • This lesson continues to build routines for discussion of Frightful's Mountain. Students begin by discussing the focus question regarding Frightful's decision to migrate or stay near Sam. Consider having the New York map and migration insert, opposite the title page, projected as students discuss this lesson.
  • In advance:

Find a globe or world map so that students can point to the migration routes to make connections.

 Do an internet search for the words "peregrine falcon" and "migration map."  Migration maps showing specific routes may continue to build student engagement with Frightful's Mountain.

  • In this lesson, students read for the gist of an excerpt from "The Exterminator." In Lesson 4, students read the whole text of the "The Exterminator."  They should be familiar with the author's argument. Be sure students have copies of this article.
  • Students will continue to practice annotating informational text and identifying the author's argument, claims, and evidence. Students will work in partners and then independently. They will also practice filling in the Tracing an Argument graphic organizer. This graphic organizer was used in Lesson 3 with the "John Stossel--DDT" video.
  • Use a document camera to model how to fill in the graphic organizer. Careful attention should be given to writing an argument, claim, and supporting evidence to prepare students for the mid-unit assessment in Lesson 8, which asks students to fill in the Tracing an Argument graphic organizer first with a video and then using informational text.
  • Identifying an argument, claim, and evidence will also be practiced in Lessons 6 and 7.
  • Read the paragraph preceding "Double Whammy" to determine the argument, claims, and evidence.
  • Consider pairing off students to work together in Tracing an Argument with "Double Whammy."
  • This lesson uses the Think-Pair-Share protocol (Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets

Vocabulary

annotate, argument, claim, evidence;

excerpt, followed suit, alternatives, banned, silo (51); pummeled, culvert (52); undulating (53); deluge (57)

Materials

  • Frightful's Mountain (book; one per student)
  • Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • "The Exterminator" (from Lesson 4)
  • Document camera
  • Tracing an Argument graphic organizer (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Argument, Claims, and Evidence (one per student)
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 6 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying Peregrine Falcon Migration Map (15 minutes)

  • Be sure students have their text, Frightful's Mountain.
  • Students sit in triads to discuss the focus question for Chapter 5 and new vocabulary.
  • Remind students they are working hard to find supporting evidence for Frightful's difficult decision in Chapter 5.
  • Point out specific growth you are noticing. For example, evidence is cited for focus questions. Also, point out the

"Words I Found Difficult" is building their vocabulary. Ask students to define: silo (51), pummeled (52), culvert (52), undulating (53), deluge (57).

  • Circulate to support triads that have questions about word definitions. Watch for students citing evidence. Show appreciation for their effort.
  • After 5 minutes, ask for volunteers to share their  responses to the focus question:

* "What two directions is Frightful pulled in?"

* "Which direction does Frightful choose?"

  • Listen for: "The two directions Frightful is being pulled in are whether to migrate or stay. Frightful stays because she spotted the 'one mountain among thousands of  mountains, the one tree among millions of trees, and somewhere there, the one boy,' Sam. She cannot leave Sam."
  • Tell students the fall migration window is open toperegrine falcons for only a few months. In order to make this journey, the body of the falcon needs to be fit, the environment right, and the atmosphere chilled. Once the migration window closes, messages from the falcon's body and environment shut off, and it is too late to migrate.
  • Finally, ask students to share with their table partners: 

* "Based on information in the novel, has the window of migration closed for Frightful?"

*"What evidence from Frightful's Mountain supports your thinking?"

  • Listen for evidence of signs of fall, atmospheric changes, and sun's angle.
  • Direct students' attention to the projected map. Ask students to find where they would be located on the map. Then, point out
  • the migration route insert. If a world map or globe is available, show students where this route would be located.
  • If time permits, do an internet search for "peregrine falcon" and "migration maps." Display relevant maps for students.
  • Ask:

* "What other information can we get from the map?"

* "What peregrine falcon facts should be added to the Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart?"

  • Add students' comments to the chart.
  • Consider partnering ELLs who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required.
  • Post the learning targets where all students can see them.
  • Careful attention to the targets throughout the lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you.

* "I can get the gist of an excerpt from "The Exterminator."

* "I can identify the argument, claims, and evidence in an excerpt from "The Exterminator."

  • As the targets are read underline these words: gistargument, claim, and evidence. Circle excerpt.
  • Remind students that these targets should sound familiar. In Lesson 3, they were identifying the argument, claims, and evidence in the article "Welcome Back."
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What was the author's position on DDT in     'Welcome Back'?" 

Listen for: "The use of DDT caused the peregrine falcon population to decline."

  • Review with students that when an author takes a position on something, it is called an argument.
  • Remind them when an author makes an argument,he/she will often have claims with supporting evidence. The claims and evidence are meant to persuade the audience.
  •  Next, ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What was a claim and supporting evidence in 'Welcome Back'?"

  •  Listen for: "The author claimed that DDT got into the tissue of peregrine falcons. Supporting evidence was the DDT got into the tissues of peregrine falcons and caused the peregrine falcon's eggs to have thinner shells. The thinner shells were easily broken when the female sat on the eggs to brood or keep them warm, and the chicks were not able to hatch."
  • Tell them that in today's lesson they will read an excerpt, or passage, from "The Exterminator" called "Double  Whammy." They will first read the excerpt for the gist. Then, they will reread it to identify the argument, claim, and evidence.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A.Getting the Gist: "Double Whammy" Excerpt from "The Exterminator" (10 minutes) (15 minutes)

  •  Ask students to locate their text, "The Exterminator."   Have them turn to page 2 and point to the paragraph before "Double Whammy."
  • Tell students we are now going to read this paragraph and "Double Whammy" to get the gist or to get a sense of the general meaning of the text. Ask students to read along silently as you read it aloud. As with other read-alouds, remember that the purpose is to read the text slowly, fluently, and without interruption. Don't stop to address comprehension or vocabulary issues as these will be addressed later, and it will interrupt the flow of the text
  • Ask students to Think-Pair Share:

* "After listening to the first read, what is the main purpose of this excerpt of the informational text?"  Remind students the gist is the author's argument.

  • Use a document camera to model annotating your text. Write the argument, or gist, in the margin at the top of the page.
  • Invite students to do the same.
  • Invite students to annotate this excerpt. Remind them to circle unfamiliar words, and after each paragraph is read, to summarize the main idea in the side margins. Ask them to stop when they get to "Public Fear" on page 6.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For students who may need more support, ask them to read and practice telling you what the paragraph was about.
  • Invite students to share the main ideas of each paragraph with their table groups. Also, ask them to share circled words and definitions.
  • Reconvene the entire class. Cold call groups to share meanings of followed suit, alternatives, and banned. Be sure to address other unfamiliar words before moving on in the lesson.
  • Some students may benefit from a text that has been enlarged starting with the paragraph precedin"Double Whammy" and the excerpt "Double Whammy." This could provide more space for annotating this excerpt.

B. Identifying the Argument, Claims, and Evidence in "Double Whammy" Excerpt from "The Exterminator"(15 minutes)

  • Distribute Tracing and Argument graphic organizer to each student. Using a document camera, model where to write the title, "The Exterminator" "Double Whammy" excerpt, and author's name, Kirsten Weir.
  • Ask students to write in pencil and fill in the title and author.
  • Pair students to read the paragraph before "Double Whammy." Ask students to find the claim of the paragraph and three pieces of evidence supporting the claim.
  • Ask students to annotate their paragraph by putting a "C" by the first word of the claim and by putting an "E" by the first word of each piece of supporting evidence.
  • Circulate, encouraging students to identify this information, and listen for how students organize their thinking.
  • Reconvene the class. Invite pairs to share some of their thinking about the claim. Using the document camera, model where to write the claim. Ask students to write the claim.
  • Invite pairs to share the three pieces of evidence supporting the claim. Using the document camera, again model where to write the three pieces of evidence. Ask students to write the three pieces of evidence.

* Congratulate students on working cooperatively to analyze this excerpt. Remind them identifying an argument, claims, and supporting evidence can be challenging when interpreting scientific, informational text.

  • Tell students you would like them to try finding a claim with supporting evidence independently.
  • Direct students to the second paragraph of "Double Whammy." Tell them it begins, "Because malaria mosquitoes bite ..." Ask them to read this paragraph to identify the author's claim and three pieces of evidence that support the claim. Ask them to annotate the paragraph by putting a "C" by the claim and an "E" by each piece of supporting evidence.
  • Circulate to support students. Ask groups probing questions such as:

* "What do you think the author means in the first statement?" 

* "What do you think she means by 'Double Whammy'?"

  • Make note of students who need support and meet with them at another time.
  • Reconvene the class. Ask students to share their claim and supporting evidence with their triad groups.
  • Invite groups to share their claim. Ask them to make corrections or additions to their claim in pen. 
  • Next, invite groups to share their evidence. Ask students to make corrections or additions to their evidence in pen.
  • Direct students to look at the evidence the author has made about each claim. Tell students if at least two pieces of evidence support the claim, they should circle "yes"; there is sufficient evidence.
  • Next, ask students:
  • * "After identifying the claim and evidence presented by this author, what argument do you think she/he is making?"
  • Model where to write the argument. Ask students to write the argument on their graphic organizer.
  • Ask partners to discuss:
  • * "After evaluating the evidence that supports each claim, is the overall argument supported by sufficient evidence? Explain why or why not." 
  •  Ask for volunteers to share their answers. Model  where to write the answer on the graphic organizer. Students should write the answer in the appropriate area.
  • Applaud the class for their continued willingness to understand an author's argument, claims, and supporting evidence. Tell them they will have two more lessons to practice these skills. Share that you are noticing more confidence in their thinking and filling in the graphic organizer.
  • Identifying an argument, claim, and supporting evidence in informational text can be challenging. Consider pairing ELLs with native English speakers and students strong in analytical reading skills with students who may struggle with this type of thinking.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps to provide understanding of text. You may want to give consideration to pairings.
  • Consider having some students read fewer sections of the text to allow time to use close reading strategies.
  • Consider giving some students a list of scientific vocabulary to look for as they read sections of the text.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Finding the Claim and Supporting Evidence in an Excerpt from "The Exterminator" (3 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: Argument, Claims, and Evidence. Ask students to think about their learning and define the three words listed: argument, claim, and evidence, as best they can. Tell them this exit ticket will allow them to self-assess and also guide their learning in the next two lessons.
  • Preview the homework. 
  • Asking students to reflect on their learning gives students an opportunity to self-assess to see how far they have come in their learning

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 6, "Frightful Finds the  Enemy." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 6.

Teaching Note: Preview the video that is used in the mid-unit assessment. http://www.science.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=en&n=730d78b4-1

  • Read the article "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution."

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